Main definitions of rush in English

: rush1rush2

rush1

verb

  • 1no object, with adverbial of direction Move with urgent haste.

    ‘Oliver rushed after her’
    ‘I rushed outside and hailed a taxi’
    • ‘England's busiest mountain rescue team had a frantic weekend with members rushing up hillsides in soaring temperatures to tend casualties.’
    • ‘Suddenly, the older woman fainted and television crew members rushed to her.’
    • ‘He contained his urge to rush to it, moving at this same pace.’
    • ‘The group of students rushed to her as she read off names.’
    • ‘At that moment, shadowy forms rushed in, moving in the darkness of the throne chamber.’
    • ‘Instead she rushed past him, moving faster than he could see.’
    • ‘He rushed over and moved the boards, ignoring the pain in his fingers as the hot wood scorched him.’
    • ‘A required course had been scheduled for the hours after mine, and the students had to rush off.’
    • ‘We rushed out to move our cars which were parked in the road in front of the house.’
    • ‘Students began to rush past me, some running from the rain, some taking their sweet time with umbrellas.’
    • ‘They notice the sound of footsteps as people outside begin to rush toward shelter.’
    • ‘Once there she slowed down some and watched the other students park and rush into the building while she walked, unnoticed in the shadows.’
    • ‘They rushed outside to meet with their comrades who were also perplexed by their findings.’
    • ‘She writhed on the ground until medics came rushing to her aid.’
    • ‘Two medics rushed in, put the officer on a stretcher, and took him out.’
    • ‘Firefighters, police officers and other selfless members of our society rushed to the aid of those in peril.’
    • ‘The bell rang and she swam along with the current of the students rushing for the door.’
    • ‘He quickly sprawled himself out on the ground as the blade rushed by his head.’
    • ‘The small crowd scattered, and all seemed to remember some urgent task as they rushed away.’
    • ‘He made a move, rushing to the left and ducking around Jim's outstretched arm.’
    in a hurry, running about, run off one's feet, rushing about, dashing about, pushed for time, pressed for time, time-poor
    hurry, dash, run, race, sprint, bolt, dart, gallop, career, charge, shoot, hurtle, hare, bound, fly, speed, zoom, go hell for leather, pound, plunge, dive, whisk, streak, scurry, scuttle, scamper, scramble, make haste, hasten, bustle, bundle
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of air or a liquid) flow strongly.
      ‘the water rushed in through the great oaken gates’
      • ‘Eric thought he could make out some noise coming from the man, but the air rushing across his ears dampened it.’
      • ‘Only a few inches separated them from live rails on the British side of the Channel as air rushed through vents in the compartment.’
      • ‘He heard the hiss of a door shutting and air rushing into the room.’
      • ‘And the kids love being in the back with the air rushing around.’
      • ‘In fact, the rear end of the car is over the broken hydrant so rushing water is bubbling up under the car and out into the street.’
      • ‘I persisted and when I finally made it through I could feel air rushing in.’
      • ‘But the finality in Angela's voice deflated that hope like air rushing from a popped balloon.’
      • ‘The crisp air rushed in from the water, lightly caressing their faces.’
      • ‘We rode into the clearing and the sound of the river rushing seemed almost unreal.’
      • ‘When she opened the window, heavy smoke rushed into the room.’
      • ‘Nervously, she entered the store, the cool air of the air-conditioner rushing over her.’
      • ‘As the air rushes past it collects small quantities of the solution which are then deposited onto the skin.’
      • ‘The tsunami that devastated south-east Asia is not how I pictured it at all - fast rushing water is what I am seeing portrayed on screen.’
      • ‘He heard the air rushing past him before he felt the first hit; he fell to the ground, hitting his face on the floor.’
      • ‘What was he thinking as the air rushed up and stole his last breath?’
      • ‘She gasped, the air rushing out of her mouth, and she stopped running.’
      • ‘Now if you have mastered this as well as me the air should rush in making a pretty rubbish hand-clap sound.’
      • ‘You have to open your mouth so as to be able to breath, what with the air rushing past, which invariably causes my eyes to stream.’
      • ‘The hot air rushes ever upward, creating a constant flow of wind that propels wind turbines throughout the tube.’
      • ‘It's a common problem to most cities, especially those with combined sewers, like ours that trap rushing rainwater.’
      flow, pour, gush, surge, stream, cascade, shoot, swirl, run, course
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    2. 1.2no object Act with great haste.
      ‘as soon as the campaign started they rushed into action’
      with infinitive ‘shoppers rushed to buy computers’
      • ‘He had rushed into his uniform when he saw the towers collapse.’
      • ‘I rushed into it impulsively, not really knowing the sort of responsibility involved with such a task.’
      • ‘So, we rushed into the war for no good reason and things are going to hell in a handbasket.’
      • ‘College students who rushed to see the film in the initial days were a bit dissatisfied to watch their favourite hero in a serious role.’
      • ‘They are certainly better informed than their elders who have rushed into judgment.’
      • ‘They had the part about attracting attention right, but then too many rushed into the creative process carelessly.’
      • ‘At Homebase in Aberdeen's Bridge of Don industrial estate, there were chaotic scenes as shoppers rushed to buy gardening equipment.’
      • ‘Zulu warriors rushed into battle after ingesting a complex concoction of roots and fungus that dulled pain and amplified aggression.’
      • ‘Increasing quantities of domestic investment has rushed into the field, especially during the last few years, as car sales have skyrocketed.’
      • ‘Over 2,000 students rushed to enter the department's business plan competition.’
      • ‘It was not the mutuals that rushed into buying chains of estate agents and had to sell out in a hurry.’
      • ‘Makers of hand-held gadgets are rushing to exploit online entertainment.’
      • ‘Most of the mistakes I made were because I rushed into them.’
      • ‘We are in funny waters at the moment for marketing stock and that is another reason why we haven't rushed into reopening the auction.’
      send rapidly, pass rapidly, hurry, push, hasten, speed, hustle, press, steamroller, force
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    3. 1.3with object Force (someone) to act hastily.
      ‘I don't want to rush you into something’
      • ‘The teacher came along and rushed me into choosing colours.’
      • ‘O'Brien emphasised, however, they would not be rushing him.’
      • ‘I avoid rushing him, and I keep munching on my sandwich.’
      • ‘My friends were rushing me through things to get to the good part, I imagine.’
      • ‘He realized now that he had been in a hurry to rush her into their relationship, and Eric had been the one for her to slow it down, to treat her as he never had.’
      • ‘The food was good and the decor nice, but I was rushed through it.’
      • ‘She kept on rushing her mother to hurry up her work.’
      • ‘She does this by talking quietly and calmly, never rushing a client and by using a gentle yet assured touch.’
      • ‘Don't rush me or try to do anything to speed up the process.’
      • ‘Everybody appears to be fairly laid back and nobody seems to be rushing you.’
    4. 1.4with object and adverbial of direction Take (someone) somewhere with great haste.
      ‘an ambulance was waiting to rush him to hospital’
      • ‘She was rushed to Dublin where she had an operation.’
      • ‘I was violently rushed towards the entrance/exit of the marketplace.’
      • ‘With major injuries to his chest and legs, Michael was rushed to a waiting medical helicopter.’
      • ‘Her hair was tightly put up and she was again rushed out into the halls, towards the Great Hall and into the royal ball room.’
      • ‘Her father began to rush the family towards the front door.’
      • ‘He was rushed to hospital in Aberdeen suffering from 60% burns on his chest and legs after the incident in the city on Wednesday.’
      • ‘Hours later, doctors rushed an expectant mother to a table, gave her a local anesthetic, and cut open her abdomen in a bid to save her baby.’
      • ‘Terrified, they rushed their kids to the pier and tried to get them onto a ferry to take them across the river to the boatyard and, perhaps, safety.’
      • ‘He took my hand and rushed me down the hall towards the elevators and then through the lobby.’
      • ‘She became another victim of the evil and false conviction that it is the one who is to blame for the accident who rushes the victim to hospital.’
      • ‘Tracy rushed her sister into the toilets to cool down the affected areas while other family members took advice from an off-duty fireman who was also dining at the restaurant.’
      • ‘But the day he became very sick, they rushed him to Rapid City, South Dakota.’
      • ‘They praised the neurosurgeon and his staff at Hull Royal Infirmary who saved their son's life after he was rushed there shortly after the attack.’
      • ‘The woman was rushed in and gave birth, but there have been dozens of cases of women delivering at checkpoints or en route to hospitals.’
      • ‘Help, reassurance and advice is just a phone-call away - and if you really do need to be rushing your child to hospital, the nurses will tell you so.’
      • ‘Sheathing his sword, he takes them by the arms and rushes them back down towards the shoreline.’
      • ‘When the fire started, the inmates were rushed outside the prison while prison officials attempted to stop the fire.’
      • ‘So when she touched down in Dublin airport yesterday she was rushed to the nearby Great Southern Hotel to be presented with a welcome home cake and her two tots.’
      • ‘They were rushed straight to intensive care for observation after the caesarean delivery.’
      • ‘But then, about one hour forty-five minutes ago, one of their little girls was rushed back to operating room.’
    5. 1.5with two objects Deliver (something) quickly to (someone)
      ‘we'll rush you a copy at once’
      • ‘I rushed it to the nearest charger and did all I could but it was too late, it was gone.’
      • ‘The General Manager attempted to retrieve it and rush it to the hospital.’
      • ‘Authorities were combing areas along the path of migratory birds for dead birds, and rushing any samples to laboratories for testing.’
      • ‘A stretcher with a life support system was rushed towards the emergency room.’
      • ‘According to state government officials, attempts are being made to rush supplies to Mahad using country boats.’
      • ‘Some of our top models appear so alarmingly under-nourished, I always feel like rushing some food and vitamin pills to them.’
      • ‘If this makes sense to you, rush your resume to the export-import bank today.’
      • ‘When that time was up, the students would rush their drawings from the studio to the Ecole in a cart called a charette.’
      • ‘Helicopters in India were rushing medicine to stricken areas, while warships in Thailand steamed to island resorts to rescue survivors.’
      • ‘An ambulance driver charged with speeding as he rushed a liver to a transplant patient has called for a change in the law so it cannot happen again.’
      • ‘One thing that supporters can do to help is to rush letters to the Ontario Attorney General demanding that the charges be dropped in this matter.’
    6. 1.6rush something out Produce and distribute something very quickly.
      ‘a rewritten textbook was rushed out last autumn’
      • ‘Scores of imitation Lee films were rushed out, with titles like Re-Enter the Dragon, Enter Another Dragon, Exit the Dragon, Enter the Tiger, or even Bruce Lee Fights Back From the Grave.’
      • ‘I just hope that as they've rushed the second film out on DVD so people can watch it before the third one that we'll only have to wait a few months for the third one and not best part of a year.’
      • ‘Labour faced public outrage last night after revelations that a top Government adviser urged colleagues to ‘bury’ bad news by rushing it out in the wake of the US terror strikes.’
      • ‘Bootleg entrepreneurs soon renamed the film and rushed it out all over the former Soviet Union.’
      • ‘Now, there is a tendency sometimes for the networks, especially the cable networks, to rush this stuff out there without taking a critical look at it.’
      • ‘‘It's more important,’ he says, ‘to get this right than to rush it out, meeting the deadline with a product that ain't right.’’
      • ‘I was trying to rush it out for Expo, but since failing to do so I've gone back and reappraised it as… not great.’
      • ‘Microsoft rushed a fix out, but not as fast as the hackers jumped on the exploit.’
      • ‘We felt it was better to do it correctly than rush it out.’
      • ‘I think we can forgive Nokia for not rushing this model out.’
      • ‘Collins and co. were willing to give it the ol’ art school try, meaning rushing a disappointing album out so the fans didn't lose interest.’
      • ‘You cannot help feeling that the game was rushed out to cash in on the 60th anniversary of the Allied invasion.’
      • ‘Unfortunately featurewise it isn't very impressive and some things actually strike us as if the product is rushed out, instead of fully developed.’
      • ‘We know the authors of the study are a long way from the ideal of scientific impartiality because of the way they rushed it out to appear before the US election.’
      • ‘So many books are rushed out when for a book to be excellent, there really needs to be some time involved to really get to the heart of the subject, and to go back through a career.’
      • ‘Also, McConnell's eagerness to rush the announcement out meant that there was still no detail at the end of last week as to when it would actually kick in.’
      • ‘These figures were rushed out yesterday by the Tourist Board in an obvious desire to prove it's not always like this in these parts.’
      • ‘The original filing came late Tuesday, while the correction was rushed out well before market opening Wednesday.’
      • ‘The classic example is in computing, where it seems that no sooner have users got used to particular products than upgrades are rushed out.’
      • ‘While some critics say it took too long for the president to come to this bottom line, others say that he seemed to rush the proposal out with a sinister motive.’
    7. 1.7with object Deal with (something) hurriedly.
      ‘panic measures were rushed through parliament’
      • ‘One gets the feeling that the work is rushed without the artist truly attempting to resolve the basic technical requirements posed in art.’
      • ‘A new survey suggested that a third of men risked indigestion by rushing their meals and a behavioural psychologist warned the nation to slow down and enjoy our food.’
      • ‘I know my Auntie in particular was worried that they were rushing it, maybe because she and Ginger's dad split up last year after a whole bunch of difficulties.’
      • ‘Even questions about those cancelled elections can be characterized as attempts to rush the process so we can get the hell out of there.’
      • ‘Students mentioned feeling rushed, and that time in between classes and at lunch could often be stressful.’
      • ‘There's a fast-food feel to it, as if it was rushed through the Hollywood grinder without much attention to scripting or comic timing.’
      • ‘It's another example of hastily-drafted legal definitions being rushed through Parliament and resulting in bad law.’
      • ‘The control orders were rushed through parliament earlier this month in the face of widespread opposition.’
      • ‘The measure was rushed through Parliament after the violence at the European Championships in June.’
      • ‘It's just such a mess because nobody's bothered to work out which lines would best suit each artist and somebody's tried too hard to be different at the mixing desk, while rushing it at the same time.’
      • ‘The reform law was rushed through parliament with only very limited discussion.’
      • ‘We have made a deliberate attempt not to rush it.’
      • ‘The 1974 act was rushed through the houses of Parliament with a mere seventeen hours of debate.’
      • ‘Everyone is rushing things now, like on the radio, where they're always in a hurry for the next thing.’
      • ‘I know I'm rushing the season a bit, but what gardener can help it?’
      • ‘They believe that this process was rushed - that there was no attempt to wait and see.’
      • ‘The relevant clauses in the Finance Bill were quietly dropped when the legislation was rushed through Parliament before the House broke up ahead of the election.’
      • ‘Remember, people want to enjoy your speech so even if you're stumbling, rushing the lines and looking at your feet, the audience will adjust to your rhythm.’
      • ‘I've never read the book, but I did get the sense from the movie that it was skimming through the book, rushing the story.’
      • ‘How much better it would have been if the majority of the thousands of submitters had been able to have time to look at those changes before the bill was rushed through the House into law.’
      hasty, fast, speedy, quick, swift, rapid, hurried, brisk, expeditious
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  • 2with object Dash towards (someone or something) in an attempt to attack or capture.

    ‘to rush the bank and fire willy-nilly could be disastrous for everyone’
    • ‘The four heroes and their ninja friend Andy rushed the thousands of ninjas, attacking wildly.’
    • ‘The others quickly drew their weapons and rushed the oncoming enemy.’
    • ‘The group then initiates an attack by rushing the prey while issuing loud calls.’
    • ‘I don't begrudge them their fame, their fortune, their masses of sweaty teenage girls and boys rushing the stage to touch them.’
    • ‘Others rushed the Alliance soldiers, swinging knives and fist, anything to stop the noise.’
    • ‘A low moan escaped his lips and he rushed me, thrusting the knife towards my stomach.’
    • ‘He brandished his knife, showing them that he was unafraid and would not hesitate to attack if they tried to rush him.’
    • ‘The remaining five were picked off as they rushed the vans in an attempt to find sanctuary from the hail of bullets.’
    • ‘If the attackers rushing you are spread out behind one another, there is another strategy available.’
    • ‘Eventually the two target sheep were in a corner and we rushed the gate towards them penning them in while the other sheep moved out.’
    • ‘The police rushed the building and captured the remaining seven terrorists.’
    • ‘According to one call, they voted on whether to rush the terrorists in an attempt to retake the plane.’
    • ‘The mob attempted to rush the doors to the 19th floor elections office, and several people were trampled and manhandled in the process.’
    • ‘Three men were manhandled to the ground and handcuffed as they attempted to rush the event.’
    • ‘Several students rushed him and he seriously wounded one before being arrested.’
    • ‘Of course there is going to be a ton of more police on patrol and they seem to be building a five mile long fence around the Gleneagles hotel as I write this, to keep out pesky protesters from rushing the hotel.’
    • ‘Cpl Foster, who was in charge of two Lewis guns, rushed the German trenches and engaged the enemy.’
    • ‘But whether the attackers had rushed the building under fire is unclear.’
    • ‘Oh yeah, they did show at least some footage of males rushing the stage during (I think) one of Morrissey's US gigs.’
    attack, charge, run at, fly at, assail
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    1. 2.1American Football Advance towards (an opposing player, especially the quarterback)
      ‘a linebacker who was gifted in rushing the quarterback’
      • ‘Everybody can't rush the quarterback, no matter how fast you are or how many spin moves you have.’
      • ‘On running downs, he plays at end or outside linebacker; on passing downs, he rushes the quarterback from all over the line.’
      • ‘Dixon is a savvy player with a knack for rushing the quarterback.’
      • ‘His coverage skills are solid, and he knows how to rush the quarterback.’
      • ‘Griffith also is capable of coveting tight ends, chasing down running backs and wide receivers or rushing the quarterback.’
    2. 2.2no object Run from scrimmage with the ball.
      ‘he rushed for 100 yards on 22 carries’
      • ‘In fact, he was at the top of his game, rushing for 1,341 yards and eight touchdowns.’
      • ‘In his five starts against Carolina in his career, Vick has rushed 40 times for 355 yards.’
      • ‘He is one of five players in NFL history to have passed for over 20,000 yards and rushed for over 3,000.’
      • ‘The Bengals rushed for 240 yards on 57 carries and held the ball for 41 minutes.’
      • ‘Each time he was given the ball 25 times last season, he rushed for 100 yards or more.’
  • 3US with object Entertain (a new student) in order to assess suitability for membership of a college fraternity or sorority.

    ‘athletics and fraternity rushing were much more important than anything that happened to you in the classroom’
    1. 3.1 (of a student) visit (a college fraternity or sorority) with a view to joining it.
      ‘he rushed three fraternities’
      • ‘He sees a potential avenue to popularity in rushing a fraternity on campus.’
  • 4British dated, informal with object Make (a customer) pay a particular amount, especially an excessive one.

    ‘how much did they rush you for this heap?’
    ‘They rushed you, all right! It's not worth a penny more than £120’

noun

  • 1A sudden quick movement towards something, typically by a number of people.

    ‘there was a rush for the door’
    • ‘I also reflected on the fact that a rush on the banks would be problematic in today's banking environment.’
    • ‘One particularly bad day, the kitchen ran out of gloves while I was helping out with a rush on the salad station.’
    • ‘No one has ever received a long-lasting happiness from securing a larger pay cheque or from beating the traffic rush on the way home.’
    • ‘He also hopes the project will raise standards so that aesthetic appreciation wins out over the rush for quick money.’
    • ‘I was knocked down in the rush for volunteers to sleep on the floor.’
    • ‘While Lucien Bouchard preached his call to sovereignist arms, the 70 made a rush for the conference room.’
    • ‘Pook's alarm grew when some of her fellow passengers started shouting ‘bomb, bomb’ and a panicked rush for the doors began.’
    • ‘But neither film triggered a rush on the Royal Ballet School as Les Choristes has done on French choirs.’
    • ‘People showed solidarity for the two minutes' silence on Thursday, but there is scant solidarity as displaced Tube travellers shove aside old ladies in the rush for buses.’
    • ‘They only opened the canteen about an hour ago & so the rush on it is terrific.’
    • ‘The darkness and heat descend upon you like a heavy black cloak and the mosquitoes suddenly make a rush for any exposed bits of skin.’
    • ‘Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman star as two hapless criminals who embark on a land rush on the western frontier.’
    • ‘There has been an early rush on the box-office, with the first six shows pretty much sold out.’
    • ‘The teacher was surprised when the usual rush for the door didn't happen.’
    • ‘During the rush on a Saturday night, he looks as if he is overseeing traumatised, scurrying troops during a bombardment.’
    • ‘Members who have not acquired or been issued with the new uniform should arrange this as soon as possible to avoid a rush on clothing stores.’
    • ‘Sold books should be returned early to Paddy or Dave so as not to have a rush on the final night.’
    • ‘‘If there was going to be a major rush for the door, it would have happened over the last year or two,’ he concluded.’
    • ‘Montgomery wanted a full-scale rush on Berlin via the Ruhr, but this was overruled by the Allies Supreme Commander, Dwight Eisenhower.’
    • ‘Then, there is the mad rush for ‘complimentary passes’ all over.’
    dash, run, sprint, dart, bolt, charge, scramble, bound, break
    charge, onslaught, attack, sortie, sally, assault, onrush
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A sudden flow or flood.
      ‘she felt a rush of cold air’
      • ‘A sudden rush of wind swept into the cavern and with a great roar, a monstrous winged dragon descended into the great cavern.’
      • ‘The sudden rush of cold air gave her goose bumps, but she ignored them and took his bandaged hand in hers.’
      • ‘The warm humid air collided with a rush of cold air causing the thunder to slither through.’
      • ‘A group of football players, resting after a practice match, say they felt a strong rush of wind as it flew past.’
      • ‘A strong rush of wind suddenly blew through her window and almost knocked her back.’
      • ‘Another rush of fragrance flooded my nostrils.’
      • ‘He slowly backed out of the stream before the rush became too strong to resist.’
      • ‘A sudden rush of wind caused him to pause and look up, hands trembling.’
      • ‘And its serene flow added a cool rush to the surrounding area.’
      • ‘The building sent a rush of cold air through their hair as they walked into the air conditioning.’
      • ‘We walked out of the front doors of the school to be greeted with a cold rush of wind.’
      • ‘The basement was nearly ripped in two as the rush of cold air from outside flooded the entire room.’
      • ‘A sudden rush of heat flowed over her then she fell over the edge to paradise.’
      • ‘And suddenly she felt a cold rush of air as the redhead actually whizzed right by her, his elbow pad actually grazing her arm as he did so.’
      • ‘A rush of chilly air flooded in and engulfed him in a swirl of wind.’
      • ‘He blinked, unable to stop the sudden rush of tears that flooded his eyes.’
      • ‘We all turned in the direction the creatures were fleeing from as a sudden rush of air overtook us.’
      • ‘The rush of funds threatens China's ability to absorb it.’
      • ‘Kim looked at him in surprise, not expecting the sudden rush of cold air that washed over her without him there.’
      • ‘A rush of cool air flows over him, giving him goosebumps.’
      gust, draught, flurry
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    2. 1.2 A flurry of hasty activity.
      ‘the pre-Christmas rush’
      as modifier ‘a rush job’
      • ‘They came in a rush when all the activity ceased.’
      • ‘With the Christmas rush on, we sure needed the extra help.’
      • ‘Alas, the rush to satisfy booming demand has led to fierce price competition.’
      • ‘At several commercial and university laboratories there is a rush on to build the first quantum computer that is capable of accessing our parallel universes.’
      • ‘He likes to visit on a Wednesday, as there always seems to be a rush on Thursdays, what with it being pension day and everything.’
      • ‘Right, OK, but you do agree that there wasn't a rush on the part of the Labor Party to oppose that.’
      • ‘The rush to solve the demand for bilingual teachers often complicates the issues of language, language policy, and power.’
      • ‘During the afternoon voting is normally slow, as there is a rush on the way to work, and another steady stream as the pensioners and stay-at-home Mums go between nine and eleven.’
      • ‘Richard calls the rush to privatisation and outsourcing ‘a national scandal that the media have somehow missed’.’
      • ‘The warning from the Department of Homeland Security sparked a frenzied rush on supermarkets and hardware stores.’
      • ‘The result is an outcry from U.S. and European manufacturers and a rush to reimpose quotas on Chinese textiles and clothing within months.’
      • ‘But the contribution sparked an unprecedented rush of activity in Bulgaria's foreign policy circles.’
      • ‘This is a major rush job and needs some serious editing.’
      • ‘Grocers around Bundaberg were experiencing a rush yesterday as shoppers on storm-alert hustled to stock up on food.’
      • ‘The financial system actively encourages the rush to monopolies.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, I have to put it aside for a few days since I have to finish something else, which I did pack for my trip, but forgot to take it with me when I left in a rush on Thursday morning.’
      • ‘The 100 or so residents are now expecting a rush of tourists, all eager to see what Britain's bleakest spot has to offer.’
      • ‘She closed with a furious rush on the turn, powered into the stretch on the outside, and roared past three rivals with a tenacious rally down the center of the lane.’
      • ‘I can't help but feel that this is something of a rush job.’
      • ‘In my rush on Monday to get to work, I actually managed to kick a pigeon.’
      hustle and bustle, commotion, bustle, hubbub, hurly-burly, flurry of activity, stir
      hurry, haste, dispatch
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    3. 1.3 A sudden strong demand for a commodity.
      ‘there's been a rush onthe Western News because of the murder’
      • ‘What is relevant here is that it is creating a rush on scarce global resources, particularly oil and gas, between China and the US.’
      • ‘There has probably never been such a rush for lard since wartime rationing or the austerity years of the 1950s.’
      • ‘Yes, there is a rush on these things but dealers are also reluctant to use them as replacements because they want to sell them.’
      • ‘If we were selling that, we'd have a rush on.’
      • ‘People seeking to buy used cars might be better off waiting a few weeks until the rush on new 2001 registration cars slows down, he said.’
      • ‘Throughout Thursday, the rush on Celtic merchandise in the big shopping centres of Dublin was frenzied.’
      • ‘In recent years there has been much talk of a rush on Scottish novels by hungry producers bearing chequebooks, though little has materialised as yet.’
      • ‘Just a traffic-building suggestion from the pros, people, but note that a serious rush on canned food and heavy weaponry would maybe help the economy.’
      • ‘The rush on commodities stretched into the gold market, where prices touched 18-year highs.’
      • ‘Supermarkets are also preparing for a rush on burgers and barbecues as people plan for a weekend sizzling in the garden.’
      • ‘It's easy to forget that blogging is not a mainstream activity yet, regardless of the rush on political blogs that is going on at the moment.’
      • ‘Ms Smith was also responsible for a rush on a type of lemon zester after saying how useful it was.’
      • ‘I suspect that tomorrow there will be a rush on it, as people flock to the shops to try this new alcoholic drink.’
      • ‘The entrepreneurial scramble to discover IP so as to exploit it has led to a rush on all manner of intellectual material.’
      • ‘Older people make up the majority of the rush on the medicines.’
      • ‘Namibia will also not be affected by the rush on maize imports, as it is not land-locked like some other countries in the region.’
      • ‘Last week's weather reports also resulted in a rush on soup stocks, a stampede on outdoor clothing and a rampage on salt.’
      • ‘Bookstores in three cities - Chennai, Mumbai and New Delhi - agreed that they had never seen such a mad rush for one book.’
      • ‘It's most likely because I've been buying it from there regularly and they think there's a rush on it so they can afford to take advantage of the situation by increasing the price.’
      demand, clamour, call, request, run, run on
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    4. 1.4 A sudden intense feeling.
      ‘Mark felt a rush of anger’
      • ‘Even short, 20 second tracks give me a rush of happiness, because I can see scenes of the movie again in my mind.’
      • ‘But it is the sight of her that induces a rush of horror.’
      • ‘Users experience a rush of euphoria with heightened perception of colour and sound.’
      • ‘I had a rush of anger and frustration at not being able to vent my feelings in an acceptable manner.’
      • ‘McLauchlan says he gets a rush of pleasure when he walks into the drawing room and the dining room, both of grand proportions.’
      • ‘As soon as I opened up my mind, I was knocked flat by a rush of emotions, mostly fear and anger.’
      • ‘Laura sighed and all of a sudden, a rush of feelings came over her.’
      • ‘A rush of fear and anxiety also rushed into my system.’
      • ‘There is an undeniable rush of excitement experienced by those who first are able to perceive a phenomenon cybernetically.’
      • ‘We are supposed to get a scalp-tingling rush of euphoria as the West Germans win big on the footballing field of dreams.’
      • ‘Perhaps because the whole site was clearly on its way to becoming banal, ordinary, I felt a rush of sadness for the victims.’
      • ‘She felt a rush of emotions with the anticipation of finding out what was in store for her.’
      • ‘She nodded as a rush of embarrassment and frustration marked her face.’
      • ‘The thought of his blind date gives him a rush of anticipatory nervous excitement.’
      • ‘I got the letter today and just felt a rush of relief.’
      • ‘Yes there was a rush of excitement under the realisation that she wasn't going to leave and that the rest of the housemates would be backing her up.’
      • ‘There are the thrill-seekers, who find they get a rush of euphoria by waiting to do things at the last minute.’
      • ‘We experience the heady rush of freedom and go a bit wild.’
      • ‘When he remembered them, a rush of happiness and fear swept over him.’
      • ‘In a rush of enthusiasm today I put it back in the front bedroom.’
    5. 1.5informal A sudden thrill or feeling of euphoria such as experienced after taking certain drugs.
      ‘users experience a rush’
      • ‘Driving home with Jonas, she felt a rush she hadn't experienced since before her husband and son had died.’
      • ‘Climbing is fun, intense, painful, scary, euphoric, and a rush all at the same time, and to put it very simply, that is why I climb.’
      • ‘Painfully loud, deathly quiet, gospel as not-gospel with gospel singers, they were a rush and a thrill, sonic joys for sonic joys and sonic depths for sonic depths.’
      • ‘Many people practice this type of exhibitionism to get a thrill or a rush from it.’
      • ‘His promises of adventure and excitement had so far been one-sided since only he was the one experiencing the rush.’
      • ‘The sight of a computer keyboard or a blank page gave me the same rush that drug addicts get from seeing their freebasing paraphernalia.’
      • ‘It's a rush, a thrill, a challenge to do something that most people can't even conceive of and couldn't do even if they wanted to.’
      • ‘After a day spent flying a bizarre New Zealand contraption that crosses a bungee rope with a microlight, Clarkson asks a qualified doctor about the rush he experienced.’
      • ‘It's essentially a drug habit: the rush is over well before the first track is finished.’
      • ‘The 2003 football season may have ended, but the NFL off season gives a rush to any hard-core fan.’
      • ‘This was big money, bigger than he had ever gambled with before and the rush was thrilling.’
      • ‘Yes, a perfectly realised single can be as thrilling as a cocaine rush.’
      • ‘It had been years since the last time he fought hand to hand and the rush he was now experiencing made him wonder why he had waited so long.’
      • ‘To read him is to experience the rush or vertigo that inevitably accompanies any trip out on a limb.’
      • ‘You know how some people get a rush out of doing drugs?’
      surge, flow, gush, stream, flood, spurt
      View synonyms
  • 2American Football
    An act of advancing forward, especially towards the quarterback.

    • ‘If given the freedom, he can run a stunt with the end and use his speed to get upfield and smash the quarterback with an outside rush.’
    • ‘The defensive scheme calls for an all-out rush against the quarterback on every play.’
    • ‘Coaches often have him provide a controlled rush to contain mobile quarterbacks.’
    • ‘If he can keep his attitude up, the Cards could really use his ability to make the opposing quarterback worry about the rush.’
    • ‘He is not particularly fast or overpowering, but he has great instincts and never loses sight of the quarterback during the rush.’
  • 3rushesThe first prints made of a film after a period of shooting.

    ‘after the shoot the agency team will see the rushes’
    • ‘There were a million and one stories and I've had the privilege of seeing quite a lot of the rushes and there are so many different ways of being able to look at the thing.’
    • ‘So in a sense this is a bit like watching rushes in a feature film?’
    • ‘You know, during the screening of the rushes, I don't speak German or Hungarian, but I could see and feel what could be the film.’
    • ‘Even so, during the course of the rushes, he gets to play every character in the film.’
    • ‘From then on, nobody bothered me, nobody looked at rushes, nobody knew what the hell I was doing.’
    • ‘On the one hand, we get to see some exquisite rushes for the film.’
    • ‘A friend of mine's father works in Hollywood and saw rushes of the original cut.’
    • ‘‘I have only seen a few short rushes of the film and I am still not sure how it ends,’ he states in a long interview.’
    • ‘Chaplin destroyed many of the out-takes and rushes from his work, and other pieces fell victim to age.’
    • ‘Shooting in Iceland meant that we didn't get rushes until a week after they were shot.’
    • ‘When Mal could come back each sort of week or weekend with the film rushes, he'd tell me the latest of what had gone on the set, and it was quite unusual.’
    • ‘The money also allows McCue to encourage small independent film - makers by screening rushes in a full-scale cinema.’
    • ‘Second, the current version is a best guess culled from the 1990 find and 30 hours of unedited rushes and out-takes.’
    • ‘The rushes and what might have been are, however, the main reason to get thee to a theater to see Lost in La Mancha.’
    • ‘Next time we'll get our hands dirty; capturing and editing some footage in Premiere, going from our rushes to a final edited movie, all within the digital realm.’
    • ‘Later in the afternoon, we felt the rushes weren't bad, which was good because I hadn't enough people for the party scene.’
    • ‘I remember watching rushes of the first few scenes we shot.’
    • ‘Nic was saying the other day, that at the end of the film you either have it, on rushes, or you don't.’
    • ‘I'll do it at the beginning to see that it's all rolling well and if it is going well during production and the rushes seem good to me, I try to stay away from the set.’
    • ‘He would phone dear Harold in the middle of the night to make sure the rushes had arrived.’

Phrases

  • rush one's fences

    • Act with undue haste.

      ‘although they had created an expectation of radical reform, his team were not going to rush their fences’
      • ‘Still, later on I think we wondered whether maybe it had been a little too soon, and down the road we had to think hard and reexamine whether we had rushed our fences.’
      • ‘She, however, rushes her fences and ends up pregnant.’
  • a rush of blood (to the head)

    • A sudden attack of wild irrationality.

      ‘what lost us the match was a rush of blood to the head when they had the man sent off’
      • ‘‘It was pretty much a rush of blood to the head,’ admitted Mrs Peat.’
      • ‘And no - this wasn't a rush of blood to the head after last week's budget - it was in fact the town's Christmas concert, which didn't leave a scrape of talent to spare with everyone getting involved in its production.’
      • ‘However, having done the hard bit, the former Aberdeenshire skipper suffered a rush of blood to the head which saw him race down the track to Baird, only to misjudge the flight and find himself comprehensively bowled.’
      • ‘Buildings go up in a rush of blood only to be pulled down a few years later.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, the veteran had a rush of blood to the head and skied his shot high over the Jail End enclosure.’
      • ‘Getting a rush of blood to the head and trying to force through projects by executive fiat can, and will, backfire.’
      • ‘Speaking after the decision, Hughes said: ‘This isn't a rush of blood to the head, we have taken two years to look at the evidence.’’
      • ‘I don't plan to go there (I hate Stamford Bridge's away end and it's on the telly) unless I have a rush of blood to the head later in the week.’
      • ‘After that, it was a rush of blood to the head and a swift handing-over of the Amex - a sin of impulse quickly committed but never regretted for a moment since.’
      • ‘All of a sudden, late last year, the Minister had a rush of blood to the head.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from an Anglo-Norman French variant of Old French ruser ‘drive back’, an early sense of the word in English (see ruse).

Pronunciation

rush

/rʌʃ/

Main definitions of rush in English

: rush1rush2

rush2

noun

  • 1A marsh or waterside plant with slender stem-like pith-filled leaves, widely distributed in temperate areas. Some kinds are used for matting, chair seats, and baskets.

    • ‘Ensure that vegetation control is carried out, if rushes, grasses or weeds are competing with young trees.’
    • ‘Bog asphodels and a circle of cotton grass brightened the rushes.’
    • ‘You pick your way from rock to rock by way of peat, heather, rushes, moss and boulders, heading for the Rylstone Cross.’
    • ‘The precise detail in illustrations of flowers and seeds of sedges and rushes are a valuable aid with their identification.’
    • ‘The area will be richly planted with trees, shrubs, ferns, sedges and rushes.’
    • ‘The area is important because it has a wide variety of grassland types, from wet and marshy to dry, and a diverse range of flowers and rushes.’
    • ‘Its name notwithstanding, this species is not a rush but a type of sedge.’
    • ‘Others seem to have taken their name from what bursts forth from the soil - Seevy is the local name for rushes while Winns means gorse.’
    • ‘Then the land went down, and there was marsh of rushes and willow and hazel.’
    • ‘We watched knowing that behind some sprig of rushes beady eyes were on us.’
    • ‘Several sedges and rushes from the marsh grow entangled beneath the shrubs.’
    • ‘The most frequently emergent macrophytes used are reeds, bulrushes, cattails, rushes and sedges.’
    • ‘Baskets are made from palm leaves, rushes, reeds, or wicker.’
    • ‘Grasses, rushes, and sedges all produce flowers that must be pollinated for sexual reproduction to occur.’
    1. 1.1 Used in names of plants of wet habitats that are similar to rushes, e.g. flowering rush.
      • ‘On the course students learned how to make papers from plant fibres such as bog rushes, straw, cotton and banana leaf known as abacca.’
    2. 1.2 A stem of a rush plant.
    3. 1.3mass noun Rushes used as a material.
      ‘he worked on the leaks in the hull, using bundles of rush’
      • ‘Stone and, later, bronze vessels became reservoirs of animal and vegetable oils wicked with rush and hemp.’
      • ‘Learn how to make a basket from straw with Ted Kelly; how to make items from rush with Patricia O Flaherty and how to make a felt piece from wool with Susie Sullivan.’
  • 2archaic A thing of no value (used for emphasis)

    ‘not one of them is worth a rush’

Origin

Old English risc, rysc, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

rush

/rʌʃ/