Definition of run away in English:

run away

phrasal verb

  • 1Escape from a place, person, or situation.

    ‘children who run away from home normally go to London’
    • ‘He wanted to run away - run away from the city, run away from the world.’
    • ‘More than a thousand desperate children under the age of 11 run away from home in Greater Manchester every year.’
    • ‘He had managed to run away from his mother in the city centre and cross two busy main roads before running the full length of the platform and onto the line.’
    • ‘The children either came from troubled single-parent homes or had run away from home to escape from the pressures at school.’
    • ‘She has run away from five years of abuse and domestic violence.’
    • ‘My personal solution was to run away from it all, and while that has made me happier, I also realize that it was selfish and cowardly.’
    • ‘According to her, a lot of the children she worked with were sent to the city by their families to beg, while others had run away from home.’
    • ‘What sort of Australian would turn and run away from this country?’
    • ‘Inspector Stuart Bruce said the victim tried to run away from them down Addison Street, but they chased him and started to punch him again.’
    • ‘Mrs Du Faur even took in a student, who had run away from ‘a terrible living situation’ at home.’
    flee, run away, run off, make a run for it, run for it, take flight, make off, take off, take to one's heels, make a break for it, bolt, beat a retreat, beat a hasty retreat, make a quick exit, make one's getaway, escape, head for the hills, do a disappearing act
    flee, run off, make a run for it, run for it, take flight, make off, take off, take to one's heels, make a break for it, bolt, beat a retreat, beat a hasty retreat, make a quick exit, make one's getaway, escape, head for the hills
    flee, run away, make a run for it, run for it, take flight, make off, take off, take to one's heels, make a break for it, bolt, beat a retreat, beat a hasty retreat, make a quick exit, make one's getaway, escape, head for the hills, make oneself scarce, decamp, abscond, do a disappearing act
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    1. 1.1 Leave one's home or current partner in order to establish a relationship with someone else.
      ‘he ran off with his wife's best friend’
      • ‘Her parents in turn think that she has stolen the car and run off with an older man.’
      • ‘We should run away together and start a new life.’
      • ‘There have been instances where girls have run away with men to escape their poverty or difficult home conditions.’
      • ‘Her husband was after running off with another woman.’
      • ‘This is traditionally the age where men go off the rails and launch into a second childhood, perhaps buying themselves a motorbike, running off with the au pair or getting an ill-advised tattoo.’
      • ‘Craddock's wife has run off with another man, leaving him in charge of their two children.’
      • ‘It is not so very long ago, after all, that press photographers lined the esplanade after the Bishop caused a scandal by running off with one of his parishioners.’
      • ‘The stories themselves are unexceptional - in the first, one young man tries to convince his brother's wife to escape her abusive relationship and run away with him.’
      • ‘She told authorities she had been in love with her cousin and had planned to run away with him.’
      • ‘His pretty accomplice takes Julia's place, marries Louis, steals his money and runs away with Billy.’
      run off with, elope with
      run away with, elope with, go off with
      win easily, win hands down
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    2. 1.2 Try to avoid facing up to a difficult situation.
      ‘the government are running away from their responsibilities’
      • ‘We are not in any way running away from these responsibilities.’
      • ‘People would rather run away from their problems than face them.’
      • ‘Roseanna Cunningham, SNP MSP for Perth and party deputy leader, ridiculed the move by Smith, and accused her of running away from the challenge.’
      • ‘He considered resigning, but his sister told him that he had to clear up the mess he had created rather than run away from it.’
      • ‘He accuses the Lib Dems of running away from difficult decisions, and says in many wards a vote for them would be a wasted one.’
      • ‘I'm definitely NOT running away from my problems.’
      • ‘The theme of the film involves the central characters encountering new situations while running away from the problems of adulthood.’
      • ‘I'm tired of running away from my fear.’
      • ‘Am I travelling towards a change in lifestyle and attitude, or merely running away from a difficult reality that I'd rather not face?’
      • ‘Sometimes, we find a way out of challenging situations by running away from them.’
      evade, dodge, get out of, shirk
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