Definition of ruction in English:

ruction

noun

informal
  • 1A disturbance or quarrel.

    ‘she acted as if there'd been no earlier ruction’
    • ‘Those in dispute have gone to great lengths to get the people of Newcastle behind them while at the same time keeping mum about the cause of the ruction.’
    • ‘Honesty about performance and worth would cause ructions that National can do without.’
    • ‘This would mean ructions in the family, whose shaky economic viability depended on your starting work the day after your 14th birthday.’
    • ‘Whoever's to blame, it caused ructions back home.’
    • ‘There have been reports of ructions in the national team.’
    • ‘My illness could easily have caused a ruction in the marriage as I just didn't want to know anyone.’
    • ‘The media requirements in Ireland are not quite as sophisticated as Australia, but it certainly did cause some ructions in the TV industry, no question.’
    • ‘There were ructions when I presented myself at the reception.’
    • ‘Steve's new mechanic mate causes ructions in the Lewis household - not least with wayward teenager Hannah.’
    • ‘The resulting gap between expectation and reality has already caused ructions in the town hall budget.’
    • ‘As a millionaire's funeral is brought forward to avoid possible family ructions, his widow speaks of 27 years of love they shared’
    • ‘This is far from the first occasion that stories have emanated from the midland county about internal ructions.’
    • ‘It's no surprise then that the early years of the industry saw constant and dizzying internal ructions including litigation, company takeovers, infringed patents and arguments over formats, equipment and materials.’
    • ‘You have to go back to the 1960s and de Gaulle, or to ructions over cruise and Pershing missiles in the 1980s, to find comparable crises.’
    • ‘I've adjusted my yoga routine to night times so that I'm doing something constructive when my neighbours are causing the most ructions.’
    • ‘After the ructions of recent days, he is unlikely to rise from the backbenches again.’
    • ‘Other ructions have appeared within sections of the Fijian elite.’
    • ‘Her mum Joy, from Bramley, said Carolynne's membership of the team's dance troupe did cause some family ructions.’
    • ‘Eager to prevent the family ruction he knows this will bring about, Ray makes a beeline over to his parents' house to try to intercept the letter.’
    • ‘Not surprisingly, this arrangement makes for its fair share of ructions.’
    disturbance, noise, racket, din, commotion, fuss, pother, uproar, furore, hue and cry, rumpus, ruckus, fracas
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    1. 1.1ructionsBritish Angry reactions, protests, or complaints.
      ‘if Mrs Salt catches her there'll be ructions’
      protest, protests, protestation, protestations, complaints, howls of protest, objections, indignation, furore, clamour, clamouring, fuss, commotion, uproar, hue and cry, row, outbursts, tumult, opposition, dissent, vociferation
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

ruction

/ˈrʌkʃ(ə)n/