Main definitions of ruck in English

: ruck1ruck2ruck3ruck4

ruck1

noun

  • 1Rugby
    A loose scrum formed around a player with the ball on the ground.

    ‘players will be encouraged to go to the ground when tackled to form a ruck’
    Compare with maul
    • ‘Ospreys scrum-half Jason Spice moved the ball from a ruck and Henson put fellow centre Sonny Parker in for the opening try of the game.’
    • ‘The visitors stuck to their task and after a series of rucks and mauls the ball was switched to the blindside for Toby Pemberton to drive over.’
    • ‘Selby hit back instantly when they worked their way down field from their own line and earned a penalty in front of the posts when a Malton hand was adjudged to have helped the ball back in a ruck.’
    • ‘Harrogate's forwards won the ruck and the ball was quickly transferred across the backs for left wing Tapster to finish the move with an unconverted try.’
    • ‘Blind side flanker Dan Blenkharn picked the ball up from a ruck and sliced his way through the entire back line to score under the posts for an unconverted try.’
    • ‘After 23 minutes Naas suffered a blow when prop Emmet Dalton was given a yellow card and sin-binned for ten minutes for killing a ball in a ruck after the referee had warned both captains.’
    • ‘Vickery is the man in trouble for illegally handling the ball in a ruck.’
    • ‘Luke Meldrum found plenty of ball in the rucks, while Travis Eddie is in good form, finding space on the wings.’
    • ‘It was a very scrappy affair due to both teams being guilty of slowing down the ball at the ruck, an offence that the referee did not penalise often enough.’
    • ‘Suddenly his side looked faster, hit harder, broke more often and crucially, for a five-minute spell, retained ball at the ruck.’
    1. 1.1Australian Rules Football A group of three players who follow the play without fixed positions.
  • 2A tightly packed crowd of people.

    ‘Harry squeezed through the ruck to order another pint’
    haystack, rick, hayrick, stook, mow, haymow, barleymow
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1the ruck The mass of ordinary people or things.
      ‘education was the key to success, a way out of the ruck’
      • ‘The trouble with all elect brotherhoods is that they tend to place themselves above the ruck of mankind.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]Rugby Australian Rules Football
  • Take part in a ruck.

    ‘too often the pack failed to ruck as a unit’
    ‘in the games so far the pack has mixed its rucking and mauling well’
    • ‘They worked tirelessly as a unit and their ball retention, rucking and tackling were almost faultless.’
    • ‘The forwards rucked and mauled to near perfection although they did not dominate the line-out like they can do.’
    • ‘With an all new control system that is intuitive and user friendly, players will be rucking, mauling, and kicking like champions in no time.’
    • ‘Bury laid siege to the Kirby Lonsdale 22 for the first ten minutes and having won three successive line-outs should have kept the ball tight in the forwards and rucked and mauled their way to the line.’
    • ‘Kendal's pack, missing some key men among six absent first-team regulars, suffered in the set scrummage but rucked and mauled well.’
    • ‘The pack were excellent throughout, controlling the scrum and line-outs and aggressively rucking and mauling.’
    • ‘Enniscorthy rucked and mauled up field and they were awarded another penalty in the 60th minute when Port strayed offside.’
    • ‘This season, Jim Telfer has been lending his experience and infectious fervour and pugnacity to Scotland's rucking and mauling and at times there did seem more of the dynamic impact of bygone days.’
    • ‘They have a very good pack which rucks well, and have a good defence too, so we'll have to be on top of our game to put them away.’
    • ‘Tullamore were scrummaging better and their rucking was top class.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘stack of fuel, heap’): apparently of Scandinavian origin; compare with Norwegian ruke ‘heap of hay’.

Pronunciation

ruck

/rʌk/

Main definitions of ruck in English

: ruck1ruck2ruck3ruck4

ruck2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Compress or move (cloth or clothing) so that it forms a number of untidy folds or creases.

    ‘her skirt was rucked up’
    • ‘I twisted to try and knock her hands away and ended up wincing as skin pulled and she pushed me back, rucked my shirt up a bit higher.’
    • ‘Their guest made a loud scoffing noise and stood up, violently pushing back his chair so that it rucked up the carpet.’
    scrunch up, wrinkle, crinkle, cockle, crumple, rumple, pucker, corrugate, ruffle, screw up, crease, shrivel, furrow, crimp, gather, draw, tuck, pleat
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object (of cloth or clothing) form rucks.
      ‘Eleanor's dress rucked up at the front’
      • ‘The fabric is rucking up a little and not making a graceful curve because I haven't trimmed all the seams inside yet.’
      • ‘The dress rucks up under the arms because the back strap has been attached to the wrong part of the dress.’

noun

  • A crease or wrinkle.

    fold, groove, ridge, furrow, line, pleat, tuck, corrugation
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 18th century (as a noun): from Old Norse hrukka.

Pronunciation

ruck

/rʌk/

Main definitions of ruck in English

: ruck1ruck2ruck3ruck4

ruck3

noun

British
informal
  • A quarrel or fight, especially a brawl involving several people.

    ‘there was a rare old ruck before the police arrived’
    • ‘The award, a virtual passport to fame and fortune, can usually be relied on to bring out the worst in the male-dominated world of stand-up, including a ruck at the party in the early hours of Sunday when the winner is announced.’
    • ‘We experienced that the Germans have a strange tendency to bump into people, which no one seemed to mind, however had this happened in a club back in England, it would certainly have lead to a ruck.’
    disturbance, quarrel, scuffle, brawl, affray, tussle, melee, free-for-all, fight, clash, skirmish, brouhaha, riot, uproar, commotion
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]British
informal
  • Engage in a ruck.

    ‘with no money and nothing to do, they started rucking’

Origin

1950s: perhaps a shortened form of ruction or ruckus.

Pronunciation

ruck

/rʌk/

Main definitions of ruck in English

: ruck1ruck2ruck3ruck4

ruck4

noun

US
informal
  • A rucksack.

    ‘I barely had time to repack my ruck’
    • ‘Members of the unit are required to complete the 10K ruck march with 55 pounds of weight in their rucksack.’
    • ‘With his back thanking him for removing the ruck, Delgado slowly patrolled past his teammates.’
    • ‘Jumping with a ruck attached is just the beginning of the special instruction military free fall school teaches.’
    • ‘I've got my gear cranked down in a ruck and a duffle.’
    • ‘Everything I will have has been shoved into a ruck and a duffle.’
    • ‘This includes a timed run and ruck marches over the hills.’
    • ‘Despite multiple layers of plastic bags, everything in my ruck has its dusting of grime.’
    • ‘Fortunately he had grabbed his ruck before rushing out and he had his cooking pot, but he was still forced to hunt for food.’
    • ‘Each soldier carried a rifle, along with a ruck, during the training, so the training basically replicated the mission the soldiers would be conducting.’
    • ‘Cremeans yanked his ‘hoop bivey’ [one-man tent] from his ruck and set it up.’

Pronunciation

ruck

/rʌk/