Definition of rough diamond in English:

rough diamond

noun

  • 1An uncut diamond.

    • ‘Discovered in South Africa in 1905, the 3025 carat rough diamond eventually made its way to Britain and was presented to King Edward VII in November 1907.’
    • ‘A statement issued this week said LKI will purchase rough diamonds and supervise the manufacturing of those deemed suitable to cut and polish.’
    • ‘It trades 85 per cent of the world's production in rough diamonds and 55 per cent of the polished ones.’
    • ‘Any rough diamond entering or leaving a country taking part in the scheme would have to be transported in a sealed container and accompanied by a certificate of origin.’
    • ‘De Beers supplies up to 65% of the world's rough diamonds.’
    • ‘Every year, India imports about 120 million carats of rough diamonds, worth US $3.84 billion and exports.’
    • ‘Russia will supply 30,000 carats of rough diamonds for jewellery and 1 million carats of technical diamonds.’
    • ‘The Indian gem industry cuts and polishes 60 per cent of world's rough diamonds by value and 80 per cent of rough diamonds by volume.’
    • ‘The maximum increase in exports was in the category of rough diamonds and gold jewellery, a Council release said.’
    • ‘He said the polished diamonds will be Namibian unlike other diamond cutting factories in the country that cut rough diamonds from other countries.’
    • ‘The domestic diamond industry may soon get rough diamonds directly from African countries.’
    • ‘That equates to $8,407 per carat, which is much higher than the $60 / carat that rough diamonds currently fetch on the open market.’
    • ‘Under the scheme diamond producer countries would control the production and transport of rough diamonds from the mine to the point of export.’
    • ‘The European Commission last week adopted a scheme to monitor the import of rough diamonds into the European Union.’
    • ‘With revenue from the illegal mining and sale of rough diamonds, the rebels have been able to purchase and stockpile ammunition to prolong the war.’
    • ‘The higher demand for rough diamonds stems from the decline in the stock of polished diamonds at cutting centres.’
    • ‘The roadmap includes a series of focused expert meetings to develop the proposed international certification scheme for rough diamonds.’
    • ‘A rough diamond cut into a brilliant round may only yield half a carat compared to another 50% more carat for fancy cut diamonds.’
    • ‘The venture is a first for the diamond industry, where the world of diamond mining, which produces rough diamonds, and the world of jewellery retailing have historically remained very far apart.’
    • ‘To manufacture a diamond is to take a rough diamond and ‘polish’ it for use in jewellery.’
    1. 1.1British A person who is generally of good character but lacks manners, education, or style.
      ‘my grandfather was a bit of a rough diamond’
      • ‘I do not think that the defendant would object if I describe him as a rough diamond.’
      • ‘I think he is a good soul but he's a rough diamond.’
      • ‘‘You're a real rough diamond,’ the producer tells me afterwards.’
      • ‘He never puts a foot wrong as the rough diamond with an even rougher tongue.’
      • ‘He was a rough diamond with a penchant for breakfast in bed and pin collecting.’
      • ‘They first spotted their talisman in training camp last year in Chicago where the Bears, unbelievably, did not recognise a rough diamond in their midst.’
      • ‘He believes they can transform the player from a rough diamond into a priceless signing.’
      • ‘Karl, ex-jailbird and one-time porn star is a rough diamond indeed.’
      • ‘Because it was such a nasty case and because, as I put it, they are rough diamonds, one had to be very careful in relation to the law and applying it.’
      • ‘Exuding coarse manners, she's every inch a rough diamond.’
      • ‘If Barry was a rough diamond, then Martin is a creamy opal.’

Pronunciation:

rough diamond

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