Definition of rosette in English:

rosette

noun

  • 1A rose-shaped decoration, typically made of ribbon, worn by supporters of a sports team or political party or awarded as a prize:

    ‘the showjumping rosettes Samantha had accumulated’
    • ‘Their efforts were rewarded when, fifteen minutes later, Blossom took the blue rosette for ‘Best Jersey Heifer’.’
    • ‘Rival candidates sought to display their strength by adorning the streets and their supporters with banners and rosettes.’
    • ‘During his five years at the chic restaurant in Gloucestershire he picked up a Michelin Star and four rosettes from the AA Restaurant Guide.’
    • ‘The restaurant has three red rosettes in the AA Guide, and the cuisine is classical with modern influences.’
    • ‘Antony Worrall Thompson who was demonstrating in the food hall later in the day was exhibiting his Middle White pigs for the first time and beginners luck was with him, for he was presented with a second prize rosette.’
    • ‘So, I talked to the GIF officers and showed them my rosette.’
    • ‘Mr Wood, who visited Petrus and got involved in an argument with the staff, wanted the restaurant to be given only four rosettes describing it as an ‘expensive poseur's restaurant’.’
    • ‘I graciously accepted the rosette and belt buckle, thanking the ring steward as I rode out and the applause trickled down.’
    • ‘There was a pause as Jenelle came out and received her rosette.’
    • ‘The prize was decorated with silk rosettes, fruit and small stuffed birds.’
    • ‘Anyway, she was friendly enough and let me linger in the corridor admiring the many rosettes she has won for her chickens.’
    • ‘‘It's been a great day for democracy,’ said one of Robinson's team as he adjusted his rosette.’
    • ‘He, too, was a champion, and his rosettes as well as his presence brightened the study where Mary Eccles spent much of her time.’
    • ‘The campaign strategy of the Tories, when not completely off the wall, shows a neurotic obsession with retaining the votes of a certain elderly constituency who would vote for anything with a blue rosette.’
    • ‘I even phoned up the AA guide to let them know about it and they have now given Malik's two rosettes.’
    • ‘The rosettes on the hips, pompons on the tail and puffs on the leg all reflect the frivolity of the French aristocracy, and have been kept by breeders who wish to preserve the dog's historic tradition.’
    • ‘Monday 7 May 1945: When I went downtown, all the shops had got their rosettes and tricoloured button-holes in the windows and men putting up lengths of little pennants and flags.’
    • ‘Another attraction at the Royal Show, also competing for rosettes and prize cards are over thirty pure breeds of poultry, exhibiting in the Poultry Marquee on the first three days of the show and followed by a poultry display on the fourth.’
    • ‘Just a smattering of grooms and judges and the salmon-hatted wives of supermarket sponsors waiting to hand out rosettes watch with a wake-like reverence.’
    • ‘Rosario's embroidered and ornamented sashes with ribbon rosettes for an imagined Miss Brazil, Miss Amazon and Miss France hang from standards nearby.’
    • ‘By about midnight it became noticeable that those wearing Conservative rosettes looked a bit anxious.’
    ribbon, rosette, badge
    View synonyms
  • 2An object or arrangement resembling a rose, in particular:

    • ‘Nickel-finish conchas normally used to decorate Western wear form rosettes when they're anchored on leather circles and tied with turquoise leather thread.’
    • ‘Designed with a center emphasis, the fabrics are arranged in rings of hexagons, with four additional rosettes in the corners.’
    • ‘The inlay elements are symmetrically organized into three concentric bands of antithetical animal groups surrounding a central rosette.’
    • ‘By the next visit, the same cupcake was shipshape, standing proudly beneath its smooth buttercream rosettes and colored sprinkles, its size approaching that of a globe artichoke.’
    • ‘(I'm told that the rag rosette was Leah's touch to hid a coffee stain on the tee-shirt).’
    • ‘For example, the dark blue triangles on the pink background of the rosettes are barely perceptible in the old photograph and may be missed entirely if the viewer is not aware of the value shift.’
    • ‘But best of all was a chilled broth constructed around delicate slivers of Maine Peeky Toe crab and a green rosette of avocado.’
    • ‘Pipe the butter into 24 rosettes onto a parchment-lined sheet pan and set aside in the refrigerator.’
    • ‘A rosette of chopped vegetables sat in the middle of the bowl, buried under a pedestal of fresh lobster, which collapsed back into the broth when you tweaked it with your spoon.’
    • ‘These night tables were often decorated with the characteristic Neapolitan rosettes highlighted with ivory inlay.’
    • ‘Decorate each rosette center with one gold seed bead.’
    • ‘The garlands are all bell-shaped, wooden-framed and covered in paper rosettes sewn into place.’
    • ‘Several of these pieces of furniture share characteristics of both groups, such as a hanging cupboard with grain-painted sides and a green front with yellow rosettes, and a grain-painted chest of drawers with rosettes.’
    • ‘The coffin would probably have been painted possibly with rosettes signifying prosperity in the after-life.’
    • ‘It was perfect, with precise, even planes and a stamped-out whipped-cream rosette.’
    • ‘Detail of the hexagon Charm quilt, shows the center rosette of the quilt.’
    • ‘The doorknobs' roses or rosettes are simply cast and machined brass discs with a ribbed outside border having a three-inch diameter, twice the size of the normal knob rose.’
    • ‘On the floor in the center is a dazzling blue sequin-filled rosette.’
    • ‘And the black dress on the right with the rosettes, it is beautiful!’
    • ‘The elastic waistband has a decorative rosette and stretches easily.’
    1. 2.1Architecture A carved or moulded ornament resembling or representing a rose:
      ‘some stone friezes carved with rosettes’
      • ‘He will also reproduce period fireplace surrounds, ceiling rosettes, and freestanding carvings in the manner of Grinling Gibbons.’
      • ‘Upon entering the hall from the gallery of the rotunda, the viewer faced the elevated rostrum of the speaker at the south end, located under an arch that featured coffers filled with plaster rosettes.’
      • ‘Among them are the carved rosette and floral vines emanating from the crest along the upper stiles, the five curved slats with leafage and fish-scale carving, and the pendant rosettes on the front legs.’
      • ‘They can also be combined with a rosette and used to decorate an otherwise plain ceiling.’
      • ‘Traditionally there was a decorative rosette around the hole.’
      • ‘The front door leads into a rotunda with a domed ceiling decorated with rosettes in the coffers.’
    2. 2.2Biology A marking or group of markings resembling a rose:
      ‘on the greater part of the body the spots are grouped in rosettes’
      • ‘Looking down at her, I admire the black rosettes of her spots against the snow-white beauty of her fur.’
      • ‘Thick stripes and spots covered his altered body, making it seem like a combination between the lines Jyfe had exhibited and the rosettes of a jaguar.’
      • ‘Bengt had always been very proud of her cat's spotted fur, which was shiny and brown with large red-copper rosettes outlined in dark-gray.’
      • ‘On a visit to a zoo in Delhi, India, in 1980, Mill spotted a feral, orange domestic cat with deep brown rosettes that lived in the rhinoceros compound and earned its keep as a ratter.’
    3. 2.3 A radial arrangement of horizontally spreading leaves at the base of a low-growing plant:
      ‘a large rosette of basal leaves’
      • ‘Their sturdy stems, topped with 4-to 5-inch-wide blooms, rise from rosettes of dark green, wavy-edged leaves.’
      • ‘These plants are frequently monocarpic, their rosettes usually dying after flowering.’
      • ‘If you want more of this beauty, you'll have to divide the rosettes in spring or take stem or root cuttings in summer, as it doesn't come true from seed.’
      • ‘In mild climates, the plant will maintain a low rosette of leaves and can be picked through the winter.’
      • ‘This jewel of a vegetable with its rosette of bluish-red leaves has great visual appeal - both in the kitchen and the garden.’
      • ‘Apply herbicides when plants are in the rosette stage and prior to bolting.’
      • ‘The plant is succulent with leaves in tight rosettes more or less four centimetres or more across in diameter.’
      • ‘Dark green leaves arranged in rosettes cover the ground at a rapid rate, and stems clad in bright yellow bracts illuminate the spring garden.’
      • ‘Hyacinth bloom buds should have come up far enough to show in the heart of the leaf rosette before you bring the pots into the light.’
      • ‘These form rosettes of waxy evergreen leaves and star-shaped summer flowers.’
      • ‘You will probably see a rosette of fresh new leaves just waiting to emerge.’
      • ‘They have low spreading rosettes of leaves numbering from six to twenty.’
      • ‘Long, sturdy, round flower stems develop from the leaf rosette starting in May.’
      • ‘Smooth leaves form a rosette at the base, which flower stems rise up to 12 inches above.’
      • ‘Plants form a tight rosette of leaves, not a long blocky head.’
      • ‘Young plants, with small leaves surrounding the central rosette, are best.’
      • ‘As soon as the second-year plants set seed and die, that seed germinates into pretty new rosettes that quickly monopolize light, moisture, nutrients, soil, and space.’
      • ‘Most are plants growing in a stemless rosette of leaves, sometimes referred to as a tank or cup.’
      • ‘The key to good control of musk thistle with herbicides is to control young plants in early May while they're in the rosette stage.’
      • ‘Harvest most of the rosettes but let a few flowers form seeds; mache self-sows readily, so next year's crop is likely to seed itself.’
    4. 2.4 A rose diamond:
      ‘three large round rosettes put together using table cut diamonds set in silvered gold’

Origin

Mid 18th century: from French, diminutive of rose (see rose).

Pronunciation:

rosette

/rə(ʊ)ˈzɛt/