Definition of rootless in English:

rootless

adjective

  • 1(of a plant) not having roots.

    ‘a rootless flowering plant’
    • ‘The horse started off again, slowly and with clomping steps that churned up loose stones and rootless weeds.’
    • ‘Plants exhibiting rootless corn symptoms have either lodged and are laying on the ground or are ready to lodge.’
  • 2Having no settled home or social or family ties.

    ‘a rootless nomad’
    • ‘She was also many of the things the writer believed must naturally follow from all the above: vapid, spoiled, rich, uninformed, rootless, and complacent.’
    • ‘Colonial security and prosperity depended on soldiers, convicts, and slaves, but they were seen as dangerous because most were rootless young males who were alien from European settlers.’
    • ‘We have witnessed the rise of a rootless generation - the legacy of immigration, exile, and mobility.’
    • ‘It is this sort of people and not rootless metropolitan babblers who value and indeed venerate the Queen.’
    • ‘Neither is rooted in Freudian psychology, though both were products of rootless lives, written after war and revolution had destroyed age-old certainties.’
    • ‘Well, I suppose the academic chaps would say I'm a product of the diaspora, rootless, not really at home anywhere.’
    • ‘He was, in truth, a nomad, a rootless wanderer, trailing from one country to another and one place to another, varying longer stays with many restless shorter travels, living alone except when visiting or journeying with friends.’
    • ‘I think people from India feel rootless when they come here.’
    • ‘Nor did the majority of Harlem schoolchildren ever have time to accustom themselves to the regularity of school life; many families were rootless.’
    • ‘Such rootless veterans lacked the ‘settlement’ necessary to qualify for poor relief.’
    • ‘The product of a lonely and rootless childhood, she seems always to have hungered for public recognition and apparently never considered marriage.’
    • ‘Some were indeed rootless men and women, like Lewis Nixon, John Fallon, Margaret Hamilton, and Martha Wright, never appearing in the census or town histories.’
    • ‘True, its residents were as rootless and as homeless as gypsies, only, unlike gypsies, they have stopped wandering.’
    • ‘In this tense account of danger and fortitude, the young surgeon discovers that he and his European medical colleagues are more lost and rootless than those they have come to help.’
    itinerant, unsettled, drifting, roving, footloose
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

rootless

/ˈruːtləs/