Definition of roomer in English:

roomer

Pronunciation /ˈrʊmə//ˈruːmə/

noun

North American
  • A lodger occupying a room without board.

    • ‘In a community with two universities, it is not unreasonable to think that she would take in one or more roomers and earn an additional sum, say $350 for eight months of the year, or approximately $250 a month annually.’
    • ‘‘Foster child,’ which was previously lumped in ‘roomer, boarder, or foster child,’ is now on its own.’
    • ‘(Adults living with others were asked by the Census to classify their relationship to the others as, among other things, ‘husband/wife,’ ‘housemate/roommate,’ ‘roomer / boarder,’ and ‘unmarried partner’).’
    • ‘Now she would be able to build a smaller house, take in roomers, and have more room for the plants which she loved so dearly.’
    • ‘The Buscherts took in one roomer at a rate of $7 per week to help cover costs.’
    • ‘All tenancies of units shall be in writing and a copy must be filed with the management office. No roomers or boarders are permitted.’

Pronunciation

roomer

/ˈrʊmə//ˈruːmə/