Definition of room in English:

room

Pronunciation /rʊm//ruːm/

noun

  • 1mass noun Space that can be occupied or where something can be done.

    ‘there's only room for a single bed in there’
    ‘she made room for Josh on the sofa’
    with infinitive ‘he was trapped without room to move’
    • ‘Laid in gravel and patio, it includes a number of shrubs and plants and offers plenty of room for outdoor dining.’
    • ‘The field was so crowded there was hardly room to move without running into a slashing sword.’
    • ‘On the inside, there is plenty of room for rear passengers and the cabin is bright, roomy and attractive.’
    • ‘His room could easily fit three of my bedroom inside of it, with room to move around.’
    • ‘The horses and people took up a lot of room and made the enormous space look almost small.’
    • ‘Small enough to be cosy, large enough to give her room to move if she wished it.’
    • ‘The man sat down between two people, so she didn't have room to move to see his face.’
    • ‘The gown had no layers and it hugged her form while allowing her legs ample room to move.’
    • ‘In three more weeks they will be more than twice the size, giving them no room at all to move.’
    • ‘It looks like a conventional backpack, with plenty of room for all your travel gear.’
    • ‘In the evenings there is room to move about unlike many bars and the music is quite ambient.’
    • ‘As they grow bigger, move them into a larger container so they have enough room to feed and move.’
    • ‘One thousand people from a fishing village were forced to move to give room to a refinery plant which was never built.’
    • ‘It was a little dinner but the table they were seated at gave them both enough room to move around with ease.’
    • ‘There is room in the safer areas for these children; householders have volunteered to provide it.’
    • ‘This should mean that some of the smaller operators will still have room to move.’
    space, free space
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Opportunity or scope for something to happen or be done.
      ‘there's room for improvement in the way the programme is managed’
      with infinitive ‘a policy which left the government with very little room to manoeuvre’
      • ‘That implies there will be plenty of room for replacement purchases in the future.’
      • ‘My fear had left awhile back, leaving plenty of room for the anger that was rising.’
      • ‘Studying The Composition of Foods, I can see why this kind of analysis leaves plenty of room for error.’
      • ‘There's plenty of room for anyone to think what they like about it, as the archaeological literature shows.’
      • ‘Where so much ground is covered, there will be room for disagreement on points of detail, or emphasis.’
      • ‘The end leaves no room for doubt, for the book actually splits into two voices, a man's and a young woman's.’
      • ‘So, to come to the point, there will also be room for some hesitancy about determinism and freedom.’
      • ‘An increasingly tight schedule meant that there was no room for quibbles about the job description.’
      • ‘His interventions were haphazard, ill prepared, and there was plenty of room for others to take initiatives.’
      • ‘This indicates that there was room for experts to disagree on this question.’
      • ‘I don't think a sequel is necessary at all, but there is room for it.’
      • ‘But don't rest on your laurels; there will probably still be room for improvement.’
      • ‘There is plenty of room for growth in Italy, a very fragmented market.’
      • ‘As this last example suggests, there is room for disagreement over the use of Ockham's Razor.’
      • ‘As with all young things there's room for plenty of potential but for now we will have to wait.’
      • ‘There is plenty of room for anarchy in such a world, and plenty of room for utopianism, but no real place for the state.’
      • ‘She said of the three offices, one was doing extremely well while the other two had room for improvement.’
      • ‘But it proves that there's room for more than one feel-good, cheeky northern comedy.’
      • ‘But they have little room for manoeuvre, because they cannot determine the prices.’
      • ‘There is little room for ambiguity and certainly no cathartic moments.’
      scope, capacity, margin, leeway, latitude, freedom
      View synonyms
  • 2A part or division of a building enclosed by walls, floor, and ceiling.

    ‘he wandered from room to room’
    • ‘Smaller houses are simply a rectangular block of four walls forming a single room.’
    • ‘The window curtain on this side of the room was dark; Ford assumed the suite had two rooms with a wall between them.’
    • ‘So he fought them, until they dragged him away to a room covered in padded walls and floors.’
    • ‘In the Chemistry Building there were a number of non-laboratory rooms on the first floor.’
    • ‘He walked around the school corridors, passing by different rooms and by walls of lockers trying to find the room where the piano was.’
    • ‘The walls and ceiling of the room were perfectly black, with age and dirt.’
    • ‘There was a wall, separating two rooms, a living room to the left, and a kitchen to the right.’
    • ‘Drinkers were served in the taproom, a large single room furnished with trestle tables and benches.’
    • ‘There is also a small utility room and separate storage room in this area.’
    • ‘One of the delightful surprises is the ceiling of the toddler room on the second floor.’
    • ‘Each room of the mansion presents a unique and different puzzle to be solved.’
    • ‘The room was an upstairs room with a floor of beaten earth, laid on beams of wood interlaid with matting.’
    • ‘And that meant one of the second-floor suites, since none of the rooms on the first floor was set up as personal living quarters.’
    • ‘To the right of the hall is the living/dining room, a large room which is the full depth of the house.’
    • ‘In the warehouse, a half-dozen or so rooms are stacked floor to ceiling with some of the world's finest wines.’
    • ‘On the first floor the master bedroom and en suite bathroom are both spacious rooms with high ceilings.’
    • ‘Finally, the attic conversion has added two further rooms with walls and ceilings panelled in white deal.’
    • ‘The cabin had 3 rooms on the first floor, the kitchen, den, and a locked room.’
    • ‘The premises consisted of a single dusty room, with a desk, two filing cabinets and one chair.’
    1. 2.1 The people present in a room.
      ‘the whole room burst into an uproar of approval’
      • ‘Others join in and the whole room burst into a riot of clapping, yells, and screaming.’
      • ‘We suggest with this game that rather than reporters popping up, there should be a whole room of reporters.’
      • ‘Isis thought of how she would like to be able to quiet a whole room by just her presence.’
      • ‘The whole room sat in silence for a few seconds before Matt said goodnight and began packing up.’
      • ‘The room erupted in a roar of approval and whistles.’
      • ‘The room once again fell silent, as she waited for her answer.’
      • ‘When she opened the classroom door the room became silent and everyone looked at her.’
    2. 2.2roomsBritish A set of rooms, typically rented, in which a person, couple, or family live.
      ‘my rooms at Mrs Jenks's house’
      • ‘Gwen and her family lived in the upper rooms of a small house and I knew from experience that the smell of too many people in too small a place hit a person the second they opened the front door.’
      • ‘They get the sign-painter's boy to help, because his family rents rooms in the schoolmaster's house.’
      • ‘He lives in rooms set apart from the rest of the house, to allow him some independence from his parents.’
      • ‘Always the Londoner, Arnold spent most of the week living in his rooms at the top of the Middle Temple.’
      lodgings, quarters
      View synonyms

verb

[no object]North American
  • 1Share a room, house, or flat, especially a rented one at a college or similar institution.

    ‘I was rooming with my cousin’
    • ‘Two young gay would-be actors in New York are rooming together.’
    • ‘They had roomed together for the last year at the academy and had numerous classes together throughout their time there.’
    • ‘He became a student-assistant coach for the team while still rooming with his two former assistant captains.’
    • ‘And you certainly wouldn't be rooming with your fiancé if he knew about that.’
    • ‘It was a phrase your father used on me back when we roomed together here at The Institute.’
    • ‘Although I wasn't one for wanting to socialize during this hard time, I guessed that I'd better get to know the people I'd be rooming with over the next two weeks.’
    • ‘We roomed together for a while, and we'd both smoke in there.’
    • ‘Posted on that wall over there is the list of who will be rooming together.’
    • ‘You don't mind if you are rooming with other families do you?’
    • ‘You might be rooming in the same dorm house you know.’
    • ‘The good news was that they were rooming together in the drafty, dirty attic.’
    • ‘I was simply tickled when I found out that we would be rooming together.’
    lodge, board, have rooms
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object Provide with a shared room or lodging.
      ‘they roomed us together’
      • ‘‘An old acquaintance of mine will be rooming you for the night,’ Dann says.’
      • ‘Instead, I muttered, ‘Because it sucks being roomed with someone who dislikes me.’’

Phrases

  • get a room

    • informal usually in imperativeGo somewhere private (used as a humorous or mildly disapproving comment on a public display of extremely affectionate or amorous behaviour between a couple)

      ‘seriously you two, just get a room!’
      • ‘We were just backstage in the green room kissing the whole time, and we heard this voice behind us go, 'Get a room.'’
      • ‘The engaged duo is seen sticking their tongues out and getting pretty close to smooching - get a room, you guys!’
      • ‘Her kids are constantly telling them to "get a room."’
      • ‘You 2 need to get a room and leave commenting to logical people.’
      • ‘Whoa, get a room, you guys!’
      • ‘Forget the kissing on the lips, but the whole caressing, bedroom eyes, etc. - get a room.’
      • ‘I was uncomfortable watching the video too, however, it was because it looked like these two should have gotten a room!’
      • ‘He loves and adores her - they have the most PDA ever and everyone else is like, 'Get a room!'’
      • ‘Oh, just get a room, you two.’
      • ‘We'd tell him and his new girlfriend to get a room, but then we wouldn't be able to stare at them kissing.’
  • no (or not) room to swing a cat

    • humorous Used in reference to a very confined space.

      ‘there's not even room to swing a cat!’
      • ‘You don't need to have been inside a dog trap yourself to understand that there isn't room to swing a cat in there,’
      • ‘We have a splendid cabin and there's plenty of room - but in most places there isn't room to swing a cat.’
  • smoke-filled rooms

    • Used in reference to political decision-making conducted privately by a small group of influential people rather than more openly or democratically.

      ‘he understands the party machine, the smoke-filled rooms, and the endless resolutions’
      • ‘They were expected to come to his house, stay into the morning hours in a closed, smoke-filled room and help him with his research programs and proposals.’
      • ‘We know that the nation's wealth is all made indoors, that power has passed from the Whigs of the land to the Tories and socialists of the smoke-filled room.’
      • ‘We got into this mess because we needed to create political leadership opportunities and replace the smoke-filled room with the open-source, collaborative politics that is our future.’
      • ‘On the one hand, the photograph gives us a hint of what it feels like to be a power broker whose milieu is the smoke-filled room, or an insider who manages the campaign from the sidelines.’
      • ‘The voters don't really participate in the primaries, and I think Sandy's got a point: not necessarily a smoke-filled room, but bring back party leadership.’
      • ‘A smoke-filled room at Marshall Space Flight Center, with representatives of every specialty at Marshall present.’
      • ‘After the Civil War, said Bonpane, ‘Hayes agreed in a smoke-filled room to take the Yankee troops out of the South.’’

Origin

Old English rūm, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch ruim, German Raum.

Pronunciation

room

/rʊm//ruːm/