Definition of robbery in English:

robbery

nounPlural robberies

mass noun
  • 1The action of taking property unlawfully from a person or place by force or threat of force.

    ‘he was involved in drugs, extortion, and robbery’
    count noun ‘an armed robbery’
    • ‘She has been framed by the gangsters and is wanted for several armed robberies.’
    • ‘The extended takes during the robberies allow us to live with the characters for a few minutes, see into their tension, precision, and euphoria.’
    • ‘As he learns, the murders were a cover up for the diamond robbery that took place that night.’
    • ‘I do indeed find political aspects to some robberies, but note that most were not directed against symbolic targets.’
    • ‘The result was a one-third reduction in the number of robberies and a general diminution of other anti-social incidents.’
    • ‘Together, they begin a series of train robberies that makes them famous throughout the South.’
    • ‘He suggests that the Balestreros find proof-positive alibis for their whereabouts during all of the robberies Manny has been accused of committing.’
    • ‘Sadly, there are no bar fights, bank robberies or jailbreaks in this film.’
    • ‘A pair of London hoodlums, rejected by the established criminal set, execute a spate of robberies which finally results in the death of a policeman.’
    • ‘A taciturn man, Olivier still grieves for his son, who was murdered during an attempted car robbery some years before.’
    • ‘He plans the first robbery in Venice, which involves the theft of gold ingots worth $35 million.’
    • ‘As a child, he runs wild with his father and acts as an accomplice during various house robberies.’
    • ‘Players who had built virtual world empires were experiencing virtual world crime - online muggings and robberies in effect.’
    • ‘Instead of being a two-bit con man, he became a bank robber, pulling off more than 25 robberies, sometimes two in one day.’
    • ‘England and Wales already have the highest levels of burglaries, car thefts, assaults and robberies in the industrialised world.’
    • ‘The story concerns a criminal gang called The Vampires, mysterious and resourceful, that terrorizes France with a succession of swindles, robberies, and murders.’
    • ‘Something tells me that the federal sentencing standards are tougher on Post Office robberies than supermarket stick-ups.’
    • ‘Other extras that should have been included are more actual footage of the event, a look at the weapons used, and perhaps a look at the boldest bank robberies ever.’
    • ‘Along with his gang of loyal criminals, he commits daring daylight robberies and elaborate heists that anger the police while stirring the public's imagination.’
    • ‘We had burglaries and robberies and car prowls and thefts and domestic violence cases that to my way of thinking deserved much higher priority.’
    burglary, theft, thievery, stealing, breaking and entering, housebreaking, larceny, shoplifting, pilfering, filching, embezzlement, misappropriation, swindling, fraud
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    1. 1.1informal Unashamed swindling or overcharging.
      ‘‘Twenty-five bucks! Robbery!’’
      extortion, exorbitant, expensive
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Origin

Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French and Old French roberie, from the verb rober (see rob).

Pronunciation

robbery

/ˈrɒb(ə)ri/