Definition of rob Peter to pay Paul in English:

rob Peter to pay Paul

phrase

  • Take something away from one person to pay another; discharge one debt only to incur another.

    ‘mainstream funding for the college was a case of robbing Peter to pay Paul, reducing the budget all around for other colleges’
    • ‘‘That is nothing short of robbing Peter to pay Paul - a knee-jerk reaction that is totally inappropriate,’ added Mr Jepson.’
    • ‘"While it has been great for local staff to have the opportunity to move up the ranks, it's been a situation of robbing Peter to pay Paul."’
    • ‘And the main source of funding, a $1.2 billion cut in vocational education programs, is seen by some on Capitol Hill as robbing Peter to pay Paul.’
    • ‘They're essentially robbing Peter to pay Paul at a time when they should be hiring as many people as possible.’
    • ‘They say they want to increase the level of support for people wishing to remain in their own homes, which everyone agrees with, but you shouldn't rob Peter to pay Paul.’
    • ‘There's simply no point in robbing Peter to pay Paul, because it doesn't achieve anything, as this man discovered at great cost.’
    • ‘‘We would have to dip into other programs to keep Energy Harvest going, and I don't want to rob Peter to pay Paul, ‘Rendell says.’’
    • ‘An anxious headteacher has told how she was having to rob Peter to pay Paul in a bid to try to balance the books at her school.’
    • ‘He described the move, which involves taking €20m from the third-level capital programme for this year, as robbing Peter to pay Paul.’
    • ‘It is an example of that adage of politics: ‘Any program that robs Peter to pay Paul will have the enthusiastic support of Paul.’’