Main definitions of roar in English

: roar1ROAR2

roar1

noun

  • 1A full, deep, prolonged cry uttered by a lion or other large wild animal.

    ‘she waited for the lion's roar’
    • ‘The unusual sound of a lion's roar came from the end of the passageway.’
    • ‘In response, the dragon let out a deafening roar.’
    • ‘In a close-up, one of the beasts lets out a mighty roar, and we see a baby sleeping peacefully inside its mouth.’
    • ‘There's an odd melody that I remember not liking from when I saw the film, and it doesn't really work that well, although it's not too bad when it's mixed with dinosaur roars.’
    • ‘The terrifying sound of the lion's roar made his heart beat with fright.’
    • ‘As we leave, echoes of the roar of the king of beasts lingers in the still air over proud and deserted ruins of Hampi.’
    • ‘The wolf let out a deafening roar of pain.’
    • ‘They stared at each other for a tense moment until the feline let loose a powerful roar.’
    • ‘The new monster let loose a familiar roar.’
    1. 1.1 A loud, deep sound uttered by a person or crowd, generally as an expression of pain, anger, or approval.
      ‘he gave a roar of rage’
      • ‘The mayor does her best roar about graft and corruption from atop her office desk.’
      • ‘What was once a shocked silence, became a sudden roar of anger.’
      • ‘To judge from the roars of approval on opening night, audiences will be finding new visual marvels to savor in this production for many years to come.’
      • ‘Still for the most part, the Dolby Digital Stereo sonics capture the roar of the crowd and the curtness of the commentary very well.’
      • ‘A roar rose from her throat, and she pushed herself backwards sharply.’
      • ‘I miss live performance, the smell of the bean sprouts, the roar of the crowd.’
      • ‘Our entire school gave out a roar of approval at this.’
      • ‘They departed the stage just ahead of Macca and Bono's entrance and an almighty roar from the crowd.’
      • ‘As it is, if you listen close enough, you can probably hear his outraged roar condemning this blasphemy from the other side.’
      • ‘Signed, sealed and delivered was the reprise as he danced to the ensuing deafening roars of approval.’
      • ‘The two principals whipped up tremendous whoops and roars from a besotted audience, and in many respects the adulation was well deserved.’
      • ‘While I was away from my seat, I heard a loud roar from the crowd.’
      • ‘There was a bank about ten deep of rabid movie fans along one side of the carpet, and each time a new star would enter they would erupt in a roar.’
      • ‘An immediate roar deafened the cafeteria as everyone surged to gather around the battle.’
      • ‘The vitality and zest of the performers earned roars of approval from the audience.’
      • ‘There is a roar of excitement when the shows charismatic host shouts: ‘Here he is, ready to pay the price for our home audience!’’
      • ‘He raised his head into the air and let out a thunderous roar.’
      • ‘She gave a roar of rage and despair and fear and fell to her knees again, shaking uncontrollably.’
      • ‘The thunderous roar of the crowd is deafening even when the stadium is less than half-full.’
      • ‘There are certainly moments of great directional use on this mix - the boxing matches and roar of the crowd come in loud and clear.’
      shout, bellow, yell, cry, howl, shriek, scream, screech
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    2. 1.2 A loud outburst of laughter.
      ‘her remarks brought a roar of laughter from the old man’
      • ‘With a roar of laughter and a big round of applause, the soldiers ask if she'll be at the dance.’
      • ‘If you have 20 people in the place, you're not gonna have a roar, even if it's the funniest thing ever.’
      • ‘Ivy responded to them, which brought another roar of laughter from the two girls.’
      • ‘The critic reported that this disclaimer brought a roar of laughter from the audience with which she watched the film.’
      • ‘Will spluttered before letting loose a roar of laughter.’
      • ‘Huge roars of laughter fill the comedy club, as the stand up comic struts his stuff.’
      • ‘If you have a full house, you hear roars of laughter at certain points.’
      guffaw, howl, hoot, shriek
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    3. 1.3 A very loud, deep, prolonged sound made by something inanimate.
      ‘the roar of the sea’
      • ‘The remastered stereo soundtrack is also a treasure - every sonic element, from the roar of a typhoon wind to the gentle tinkling of wind chimes, is pristinely preserved.’
      • ‘This is an incredibly well-managed track that lets you feel the rumble and roar of the tanker every time it bears down on or overtakes the struggling Plymouth.’
      • ‘The muffled roar of passing traffic obscure the tinny, faint words being spoken.’
      • ‘The roar of flames racing down the corridor made them all run even faster.’
      • ‘He loved the squeal of smoking tires, the roar of the engine, and the thrill of a hairpin turn in a power drift.’
      • ‘Two scenes in particular stand out for their use of offscreen space; the first, a shot of a nondescript intersection, which seems unremarkable until the roar of an unseen plane flying very close overhead is deafening.’
      • ‘Eve quickened her pace as she heard the distant roar of an engine pulling up into the driveway.’
      • ‘The prolonged moments of near silence in the film produce the aesthetic effect of outlasting the remembered roar of government tanks.’
      • ‘The school shook under the mighty roar of the thunder.’
      • ‘The roar of the wind died as the trailer came to a complete stop.’
      • ‘He could hear the roars of the tornado; he even drew something similar to a tornado, which looked like a funnel…’
      • ‘He was about to get in when they both heard the loud roar of a motorcycle engine coming their way.’
      • ‘Wind gags are basically furry things that fit over your mike, that cut down on the roar you will hear if filming in wind.’
      • ‘The gorgeous changing colors of the high-tech map were accompanied by sound: the babble of many meteorologists overlaid by the powerful roar of wind and waves.’
      • ‘Periodically, unpredictably, a roar makes the pavilion tremble and the menacing shadow of a low-flying plane is projected slowly across the vaulted ceiling.’
      • ‘The roar of the machines, the echoes within the massive structures, the subtly of whispered voices are all discovered anew here.’
      • ‘The roars of battle grew weaker and more distant; it was evident that the remaining forces on both sides were on the move and departing.’
      • ‘Instead, the only soundtrack is the roar of the cars' engines, turning over at very high RPM.’
      • ‘Occasionally the rumble of a volcano or the roar of a fierce hurricane breaks up the usual sounds.’
      • ‘The architects looked to glazing to combat the roar of 74,000 vehicles daily.’
      loud noise, boom, booming, crash, crashing, rumble, rumbling, roll, thundering, peal, crack, clap, thunderclap
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verb

  • 1no object (of a lion or other large wild animal) utter a full, deep, prolonged cry.

    ‘we heard a lion roar’
    • ‘The beast roars up at you and grabs your neck, dragging you into the swamp with it.’
    • ‘It's pretty hard to hear where a cue is going when you have Brontosaurs roaring left right and centre.’
    • ‘The lion roared in anger, but the sound trap held him well.’
    • ‘The dragon roared in pain as her vision blurred permanently in her right eye.’
    • ‘He plays the part of the lion that roars onstage in Act 5.’
    • ‘The lion roared again, but it was no use now.’
    • ‘A cheetah bounds into a picture, large as life, head thrown back and maw wide, roaring over a rib cage.’
    • ‘The format quickly posed an annoyance - did I really need to endure the MGM lion roaring at the start of every single featurette?’
    • ‘Both dragons roared in mortal pain and shot away from each other in opposite directions despite their injuries.’
    • ‘It was always a sure-fire shocker for a monster to wade out of the reeds, roaring, and grab somebody off the raft.’
    • ‘The group of creatures all roared loudly, baring their sharp teeth.’
    1. 1.1 (of a person or crowd) utter a loud, deep, prolonged sound, typically from anger, pain, or excitement.
      ‘Manfred roared with rage’
      • ‘The Moscow crowd roared with approval.’
      • ‘The crowd roars with delight during the whole thing.’
      • ‘That's how he keeps betraying us, why he roars at us with such conviction.’
      • ‘Now enraged beyond definition, he roared in fury and raised his arms.’
      • ‘The director finally called cut and the audience continued to roar with applause.’
      • ‘I tried to roar in triumph, and caused myself to fall into a coughing fit.’
      • ‘The bass thumps, the crowd roars and it's the band, tearing it up.’
      • ‘The competition itself plays out like a game show with one nation firing off musical shots against another while surrounding beer drinkers roar with approval.’
      • ‘Paige then roared with fury and struggled all she could to free herself.’
      • ‘She roared out in agony, helpless to do anything except violently curse the executor of her friend.’
      • ‘At the sound, the crowd in the arena roared with delight.’
      • ‘I roared in delight at the ludicrousness, while remaining riveted at the cheerful upping of the stakes.’
      • ‘Abe roared out in anger and threw a dagger.’
      • ‘Involuntarily, he grasped for the memory, and finding nothing, he roared in frustration.’
      • ‘The defining moment - and the point at which even the biggest sceptic will be roaring with delight - is when Yoda himself picks up a light-sabre and dishes out some punishment.’
      • ‘He roared in a rage, giving his attack more power as well.’
      • ‘Fox has sprung for a couple of extras that should have them roaring with thunderous applause.’
      • ‘They scream with delight and roar with approval over the littlest guitar or drum trick.’
      • ‘Aquila roared out in agony as he desperately tried to steer his beloved vessel.’
      • ‘The students roar with approval, and, even though the principal expels her and crosses her name off the ballot, her fellow students vote for her anyway.’
      bellow, yell, shout, bawl, howl, cry, shriek, scream, screech
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    2. 1.2 (of something inanimate) make a very loud, deep, prolonged sound.
      ‘a huge fire roared in the grate’
      • ‘As you feel the plane angle back as it approaches the deck you hear the engine roar while the pilot basically floors it.’
      • ‘The scientist says that when the 2000 fire roared through, the ungrazed pastures fared the worst.’
      • ‘The car took off like a runaway rocket, the engine roaring, smoke billowing and lights glaring.’
      • ‘Instantly I felt the plugs on my head warm up and the ship's engines suddenly roar to life.’
      • ‘The wind roared in his ears as the trees whipped by on either side of him.’
      • ‘The fire that had roared in the hearth was just glowing embers now.’
      • ‘Back in my quarters there was a fire roaring away in the grate.’
      • ‘He touched the console again, and the engines suddenly roared to life.’
      • ‘To the right was the interior to the library where a fire was roaring in the fireplace and a bunch of actors were hanging around preparing for their next shoot.’
      • ‘As the regiment slowed to a stop, the fire of the enemy roared louder.’
      • ‘It was on that night that tornadoes roared through many communities in Nebraska.’
      • ‘On Aug.13, Hurricane Charley roared in from the Gulf of Mexico, bringing winds of 140 miles per hour and spawning tornadoes.’
      • ‘The flames roared overhead, and we ran.’
      • ‘I could not get near to it for the water which seemed deep and roaring but my desire was always intense to come nearer.’
      • ‘The gravelly whir of wheels on pavement is subtle, while motorcycle engines throb and roar.’
      • ‘There is gunfire not far away, and fighter planes sometimes roar overhead.’
      • ‘Coastline defences include a nearby air base and military jets still roar overhead.’
      • ‘The bike's engine sputtered and then roared back to life as the two of them hopped on.’
      • ‘The sound of the fire roared in my ears.’
      • ‘Thunder roared in the distance, and reality slapped me straight in the face.’
      boom, rumble, crash, roll, thunder, peal
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    3. 1.3with object Utter or express in a loud tone.
      ‘the crowd roared its approval’
      with direct speech ‘‘Get out of my way!’ he roared’
      • ‘The audience roared their approval, and Lord Scion lowered his hands firmly onto Avon's shoulders.’
      • ‘The audience roared their approval during his performance and as the results were announced on Saturday night.’
      • ‘Well guys, I would wait and see if the public roars approval before you spend more money, otherwise you may find yourselves well down the food chain.’
      • ‘The audience roared its approval.’
      • ‘Terfel roars out his righteous rage and coos his ludicrous love songs with equal aplomb, making the formidable vocal feats seem almost ridiculously easy.’
    4. 1.4with object and adverbial (of a crowd) encourage (someone) to do something by loud shouts or cheering.
      ‘Damon Hill will be roared on this weekend by a huge home crowd’
    5. 1.5 Laugh loudly.
      ‘Shirley roared in amusement’
      • ‘There is very little banter back and forth between comic and crowd; indeed, Gottfried is just there to deliver his compendium of crudity and accept the accolades of his adoring - and roaring - fans.’
      • ‘The audience roared with laughter at the staggering social comment of the in-your-face but indispensable documentary, winner of the Audience Award.’
      • ‘I can picture audiences roaring with laughter at shorts such as this, though I find that humor has come a long way since.’
      • ‘Here was this man who enjoyed putting someone on to the point of tears, and then be so nice and so good and so giving that everyone would just roar with laughter over a good joke.’
      • ‘The crowd roared with laughter and music was started once again as the couple danced across the floor.’
      • ‘They caught the humor instantly and roared with delight.’
      • ‘As the crowd roars with laughter, the camera pans back so that we see her bare back behind the podium.’
      • ‘Seeing it on a big screen with an audience - an appreciative audience roaring with laughter - is a vastly different experience than seeing it on TV and chuckling to oneself.’
      • ‘The crowd had roared with laughter at those times, or screamed their agreement.’
      • ‘When I saw Marmoolak the theater roared with laughter almost throughout the film.’
      • ‘This scene came to mind as the audience roared with laughter when he set off the bomb.’
      • ‘The audience roars with laughter as Laverne nods in perfect acceptance and understanding.’
      • ‘The gags in the movie make the one-liners in the evening sitcoms look recherché, but the packed house I saw the film with roared at every one.’
      • ‘We can see the Benedictines roaring with laughter, twisting in their seats, their faces changing color like the chimera's skin was supposed to do.’
      guffaw, laugh heartily, howl with laughter, roar with laughter, shriek with laughter, laugh hysterically, laugh uproariously, be convulsed with laughter, burst out laughing, hoot
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    6. 1.6 (of a horse) make a loud noise in breathing as a symptom of disease of the larynx.
  • 2no object, with adverbial (especially of a vehicle) move at high speed making a loud prolonged sound.

    ‘a car roared past’
    • ‘Several women scream and the car roars off down the street.’
    • ‘An ambulance roared down the road by the park at a breakneck speed.’
    • ‘The train roars past on the adjacent tracks and grandfather is left standing, shoulders square and legs firm.’
    • ‘They meet on a bridge, with traffic roaring past.’
    • ‘He then roared away into the darkness.’
    • ‘I back up quickly, then turn and roar off down the street.’
    • ‘I remember not being able to stay in the theatre when the bikes came roaring up the road towards the woman and child.’
    • ‘They have a faithful hound, Bruno, who barks at the trains, which roar past the house every hour of the day.’
    • ‘Suddenly a cart roared down the road behind them, and half running him over.’
    • ‘Annabelle and Lee picked Julia up in a rented car, aimed it at Chioggia in the Veneto, and the three of them roared across northern Italy.’
    • ‘With a smile and a nod, Zoe once again roared down the road.’
    • ‘A motorcycle roared up the street outside the church, tearing the music, but Anton drew the threads together again, feeling the audience entering the music with him.’
    • ‘She listened as her dad's car roared off down the street.’
    • ‘The fire truck roared alongside the giddy crowd while they investigated the problem.’
    • ‘It seems he has reserved this dune buggy strictly for visiting those planets where a bunch of aliens, themselves in dune buggies, are likely to come roaring over the hills.’
    • ‘Towards the end of Long Weekend, Marcia decides to opt out of Peter's suicidal scenario for toughing it out against Nature, and roars off alone in the van.’
    • ‘We wave as he roars off down the narrow lane - scattering plastic and leaves.’
    • ‘All the ideas evident in early German expressionism are applied to the simple design of two cars roaring down a dark and desolate road.’
    • ‘As a commuter train roars into a college campus in Chicago, its noise is suddenly muffled when it enters a stainless steel tunnel that sits atop the new student center.’
    • ‘Surrounded by rats with trains roaring by a few feet away, they managed to cook and sleep, care for pet dogs and cats and even be good neighbours.’
    speed, zoom, whizz, flash
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    1. 2.1 Act or happen fast and decisively or conspicuously.
      ‘Swindon roared back with two goals’
      • ‘When the jazz age roared in, for example, the flamboyant Tom Mix replaced the Victorian William S. Hart as the most popular Western hero of the teens.’
      • ‘After various musical interludes, Chase roars into action to blow up the giant radioactive beast.’
      • ‘By combining state-of-the-art computer animation with live-action landscapes, you'll marvel as these fearsome creatures roar to life!’
      • ‘For a moment the film's ominous underlying theme, parental panic, roars to the surface with great immediacy and clarity.’
      • ‘For much of the film, it's a subtle track, but when required, it roars to life in a very aggressive manner.’
      • ‘Distortion is held to a minimum and the movie's numerous sound effects come roaring through.’
      • ‘England roared back into contention in the final quarter of the match helped by the referee.’
      • ‘Finally, the season roars to a close with another major death - this time, Buffy's.’
      • ‘During the film's climactic plane crash sequence, you can feel the bass rumble and the rear speakers roar to life.’
      • ‘The picture roars to life intermittently during these skilled performances, yet despite its high stakes tale of revenge and killings, the film fails to fully engage.’

Phrases

  • roar someone up

    • informal Berate or reprimand someone.

      ‘he roared me up and asked the sergeant for my name’
      • ‘Nory went over, assessed the situation, and got on the Utilities officer and roared him up.’
      • ‘The boys are very amused when I roar him up and ask why the hell he hasn't brought his uncle back anything.’
      • ‘How rude and unprofessional! I was so mad, I called them out and roared them up.’
      • ‘Just roar her up. You know, tell her the cops'll come, or she'll go to hell or something.’
      • ‘My doctor pal roared me up and said I was overweight and under-blooded’

Origin

Old English rārian (verb), imitative of a deep prolonged cry, of West Germanic origin; related to German röhren. The noun dates from late Middle English.

Pronunciation

roar

/rɔː/

Main definitions of roar in English

: roar1ROAR2

ROAR2

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