Definition of risqué in English:

risqué

Pronunciation /rɪˈskeɪ//ˈrɪskeɪ//ˈriːskeɪ/

adjective

  • Slightly indecent and liable to shock, especially by being sexually suggestive.

    ‘his risqué humour’
    • ‘So far, its risqué new TV ads aren't adding up to car sales’
    • ‘It's a good idea to be a little more conservative on the first date and then, once you start getting to know the person a little more, you can start showing off the more risqué side of your wardrobe. intriguing imagination’
    • ‘Though its cut was less risqué than many of the other gowns, its colour was an almost blatant invitation when a male looked upon her.’
    • ‘A bit too much of a risqué subject,’ Ree said with a little grin.’
    • ‘Attempting to capture the saucy spirit of the movies and genre on which the series was based, and even featuring several of the frisky familiar faces from the films, one would anticipate a risqué, ribald offering.’
    • ‘We browsed through several stores in the mall, but everything I found was either too conservative, too risqué, too expensive, too fancy, or too simple.’
    • ‘The couple next to me has begun a rather risqué make-out session and from the front of the bus, I can hear a baby crying.’
    • ‘Although some items listed below are more risqué than conservative, part of being stylish is knowing what's appropriate for different occasions and crowds.’
    • ‘Instead, it's a very conventional comedy with a premise that might've been considered risqué 20 years ago but is now the stuff of even the most banal sitcoms.’
    • ‘And people were dancing, in the center of the room, dozens of gorgeous people swaying to the beat, showing no reluctance to throw themselves into risqué moves.’
    • ‘If you think either color is a bit risqué, wear it in the form of something classic, like a crewneck or button-down shirt.’
    • ‘They were both being risqué, breaking the barrier between friendship and courtship, but neither complained because neither minded.’
    • ‘The new, though somewhat risqué dance was extremely fashionable, and was favored by the young and amorous, as it allowed them to be in close contact with each other.’
    • ‘In short, you get the suggestion of something risqué - a tease.’
    • ‘It was slightly more risqué than the other outfits, only because of the midriff and back showing, along with some cleavage.’
    • ‘She tended to wear the short skirts and the slightly risqué shirts or tank tops, but somehow she could pull the look off without being labeled a slut.’
    • ‘She is wearing an elegant Victorian dress, with the bodice cut slightly low enough to be a little risqué, guessing at the time frame of their society.’
    • ‘It sounds risqué, but even in context it really is a tease.’
    • ‘She looked down self-consciously at the nearly sheer linen that covered her arms, wondering if it was too risqué, coupled with everything else.’
    • ‘If you're ready for a change in your look, but aren't just ready to add risqué items to your wardrobe, then take the style plunge by taking bigger risks with smaller articles.’
    bawdy, indecent, ribald, rude, racy, broad, earthy, rabelaisian, spicy, suggestive, titillating, improper, naughty, indelicate, indecorous, off colour, locker-room
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 19th century: French, past participle of risquer ‘to risk’.

Pronunciation

risqué

/rɪˈskeɪ//ˈrɪskeɪ//ˈriːskeɪ/