Main definitions of rip in English

: RIP1rip2rip3RIP4rip5

RIP1

  • Rest in peace (used on graves).

Main definitions of rip in English

: RIP1rip2rip3RIP4rip5

rip2

verb

  • 1[with object and adverbial of direction] Tear or pull (something) quickly or forcibly away from something or someone.

    ‘a fan tried to rip his trousers off during a show’
    figurative ‘countries ripped apart by fighting’
    • ‘He quickly ripped the tape from his mouth and fumbled for the pocketknife he had so that he could cut his hands free.’
    • ‘He couldn't do it, now, but he didn't care for his attention was ripped away just as quickly.’
    • ‘Yasu ripped it open and pulled out the biggest black sword you have ever seen!’
    • ‘She quickly ripped her arm out of the girl's grasp and began to pull on her shoes.’
    • ‘Darren checked for a pulse and quickly ripped his hand back.’
    • ‘Such a measure, if adopted, might well have meant the destruction of America, ripping the country apart.’
    • ‘The more I read, the more I wanted to rip the pages apart.’
    • ‘Reiko yelled as something pulled her away and ripped her hand from Tyler's.’
    • ‘He fetched the keys from his pocket, grabbing them and ripping them out quickly, wasting no time.’
    • ‘She quickly ripped the letter out, letting the envelope fall to the ground, fumbling with the paper a bit, trying to unfold it.’
    • ‘The fur covering the door was quickly ripped down and in stormed what seemed to Ashley like an army of men.’
    • ‘Now with both hands, he ripped it apart, and tore it into shreds.’
    • ‘He felt as if he was throwing up everything inside of him, his insides being ripped, pulled, torn out.’
    • ‘It tore through the city, ripping buildings apart.’
    • ‘She handed the pencil and pad to Aubrey, who scribbled something quickly and ripped the paper out of the pad.’
    • ‘She extended the claws on both her hands, then, in a sudden movement, grabbed each end of the tangle and pulled, ripping it apart.’
    • ‘She flipped it over and quickly started ripping it open.’
    • ‘Niguel muttered in awe, tugging at a feather, pausing, and suddenly pulling it roughly, ripping it right out.’
    • ‘For a moment, Boraz was forced to land on the bridge, but as quickly as he could grasp the net, he was ripping it apart.’
    • ‘She quickly ripped the paper free and thrust it into my hands.’
    tear, snatch, jerk, tug, wrench, wrest, prise, force, heave, haul, drag, pull, twist, peel, pluck, grab, seize
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object]Make a long tear or cut in.
      ‘you've ripped my jacket’
      • ‘He wrapped it in the ripped cloth of his jeans and handed it to Ami.’
      • ‘Her dress caught on the door and with a strong pull, Isabella ripped the garment.’
      • ‘He was wearing ripped jeans and his now-fraying Peter Pan t-shirt.’
      • ‘He looked presentable, although he did even when he wore jeans and a ripped t-shirt.’
      • ‘He wore dark jeans, ripped near the bottom, a green t-shirt and a black leather jacket.’
      • ‘After few minutes of careful searching she pulled out black ripped jeans, black shirt, and red hoodie.’
      • ‘Motioning to Katie for something to eat, a small girl marched up on the stage, her brown hair tangled and her jeans ripped.’
      • ‘He was wearing a pair of extremely battered blue jeans that were ripped in a few places.’
      • ‘Carefully, doing her best not to rip it, Adia pulled the crumpled piece of paper out of the hole and unfolded it.’
      • ‘He caught his shirtsleeve on something, but pulled it free, ripping the cloth.’
      • ‘The bright bubbly blonde made her way to my car in tight black jeans and a ripped black tank top with some writing on it.’
      • ‘All of her jeans were torn and ripped at the knees and hem, and were patched in many places as well.’
      • ‘Ari wasn't quick enough to leap out of the way and the man grabbed him by his shirt, ripping it and pulling Ari towards himself.’
      • ‘He was wearing his favorite jeans that were ripped down the left knee.’
      • ‘She wore a pair of loose, faded jeans that were ripped all over and a plain black tank-top.’
      • ‘I decided to wear my favorite pair of blue low rider jeans, which were ripped at both knees, along with a normal yellow t-shirt.’
      • ‘My dress is ripped, and he pulls it off me so that it decorates the floor.’
      • ‘She was wearing ripped faded jeans and a white hooded sweater with oversized bell sleeves.’
      • ‘She couldn't have been any older than Calida, with long, bushy blonde hair and a thick figure, dressed in baggy jeans and a ripped shirt.’
      • ‘She wore an old pair of jeans that were ripped in places and patched in others.’
    2. 1.2[with object]Make (a hole) by force.
      ‘the truck was struck by lightning and had a hole ripped out of its roof’
      • ‘In the kayak, he is up to his waist in gravel and dirt, for a gaping hole has been ripped in the bottom.’
      • ‘Of course, that was after I ripped a twenty-foot deep hole in the ground trying to pick up a pebble.’
      • ‘Across the way, he saw the reason there was no atmosphere in the dome: a large hole had been ripped in the outer wall.’
      • ‘The second burst ripped holes in the seat, but failed to hit the driver.’
      • ‘He was now wearing his shirt again; a large hole had been ripped where the snake had struck.’
      • ‘The dragon roared and forced its claws in and ripped its hole wider in an attempt to force its way into the town.’
      • ‘He felt like a hole had been ripped in his chest.’
      • ‘She flew through a hole conveniently ripped in the sky and was gone.’
      • ‘He shoved it hard into the floor and pulled, ripping an ugly gash in an expensive rug.’
      • ‘Suddenly I stopped propelling the ball forward and pierced the prism, ripping a huge jagged scar in it.’
      • ‘I scribbled furiously in giant circles across the paper, ripping holes through it with all that force.’
      • ‘Byran opened the door again to reveal the gaping hole ripped in the wall that reached to the second hallway.’
      • ‘I noticed as he set down the box he'd been carrying that he was wearing a faded black shirt with holes ripped in the short sleeves and bottom hem.’
      • ‘His proud cruiser was listing badly to port, a gaping hole ripped out of her belly.’
      • ‘That's when I remember that she jumped on a potential murderer to keep me from having a hole ripped straight through my ribcage.’
      • ‘I put on my blue jeans with a hole ripped in the right knee.’
    3. 1.3[no object]Come violently apart; tear.
      ‘the skirt of her frock ripped’
      • ‘My feelings for him blossomed, then ripped apart just like that.’
      • ‘She screamed, so loud her throat felt like it was ripping apart and she knew instantly he was gone.’
      • ‘Everything around the area was ripping apart, chunks of ice, rock, everything was being destroyed.’
      • ‘Sasaki huddled against the hot grains of sand, gritting her teeth, curled up in a ball and hugging her shoulders as if to keep herself from ripping apart.’
      • ‘Vanishing into nothingness, he felt his body and soul, breaking apart and ripping.’
      • ‘The quiet period abroad wasn't entirely quiet, because the Soviet Union started ripping at the seams.’
      • ‘I could hear nothing in her voice, and somewhere deep in my chest if felt like something was ripping apart.’
      • ‘The instant she was out of the dining room, she broke out into a run, heart pounding, insides ripping apart, breathing shallowly.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, it didn't hold up: within 8 schooldays, one of the straps that go over the shoulder had ripped apart.’
      • ‘He feels like his body is ripping apart, like he's on fire from the inside out.’
      • ‘Her eyes were glowing a deep red color, and soon her Persian smock ripped apart, revealing ancient Egyptian garb.’
      • ‘The hiss turned into a scream, this one more like a ship's keel ripping apart under pressure than a triumphant blood-chilling cry like before.’
      • ‘His back arches and his fingers claw at the air as he sinks to the floor, his dress ripping apart and his wig falling off.’
      • ‘Bren pulled Sarah's hair till I thought it was going to rip right off her head.’
      • ‘She hit and hit until she'd gotten through to the picture itself and then it finally was heard ripping apart.’
      • ‘The wall seemed to be ripping apart; loud, shredding fractures formed all along the base line.’
      • ‘Its body ripped apart as its almost human scream filled the night.’
  • 2[no object, with adverbial of direction] Move forcefully and rapidly.

    ‘fire ripped through her bungalow’
    • ‘An explosion ripped through the peaceful air of Little Pajaro.’
    • ‘Element's body stiffened up as the words ripped through his consciousness.’
    • ‘His scream had ripped through the apartment, waking me.’
    • ‘An arrow ripped through the air, barely landing on the bull's eye.’
    • ‘A pain ripped through her body and the wind howled around her.’
    • ‘Finally, after another series of twists and turns, Domenic finally scores a few hits, and smoke rips through the large hole in the back of Leana's ship.’
    • ‘To my left and right stood two sets of rusted metal gates where the ear-piercing screams of agony ripped through the air, blocking out all other noise.’
    • ‘She moaned as another sharp pain ripped through her abdomen.’
    • ‘As each flash ripped through the reddened sky, the force of the angry discharge made him gasp in awe.’
    • ‘Helene's blood-curling scream ripped through the castle like an alarm.’
    • ‘Shock ripped through my body when he said my boyfriend's name.’
    • ‘The announcement of the acquisition ripped through quarters of the African American community like a shock wave.’
    • ‘Merlin's head rocked back from the force of the impact and an explosion ripped through his ears.’
    • ‘A sob ripped through the young lord as he collapsed against her, burying his face in her lap, his arms wrapped around her slender waist.’
    • ‘Before either could react, a blaze of fire and wind ripped through the night sky and knocked Mithras several feet into the air.’
    • ‘The man lunged forward and a scream ripped through the air.’
    • ‘Then the pain disappeared and he heard and felt something ripping through the Velcroed holes on the back of the bathrobes and something sliding down by his legs.’
    • ‘Slowly changing from the hospital garb to my fresh clothing, I managed to bite back all but one moan, as pain ripped through my side at any sharp movement.’
    • ‘Running, I ripped through the thick blankets of fog and found myself still running towards my family's silhouette.’
    • ‘A shock of electricity ripped through me, making my muscles jerk and my hands clench; he caught me as my knees gave out.’
  • 3Computing
    [with object] Use a program to copy (material from a CD or DVD) on to a computer's hard drive.

    • ‘What's more, I'd wager that there are even more people who simply rip DVDs they've rented from the local video store - but I see no mention of that form of piracy in the article.’
    • ‘Typically, you'll need separate software to do specific tasks, such as burning DVDs, ripping audio, and of course burning CDs.’
    • ‘These companies just took those tools for ripping DVDs and put a pretty GUI on them.’
    • ‘I sent him a ripped copy of your CD, and asked him if he was interested.’
    • ‘There have been hi-fi units equipped with hard drives, but nothing beats a personal computer for ripping and managing an audio collection.’
    • ‘The current copy control system, in other words, is not intended to block all copying, but simply to stop the average computer user from ripping the Beastie Boys for his friends.’
    • ‘Media encoding for home and professional use is becoming more popular, as more users rip audio to their hard drives, or edit home movies.’
    • ‘Another option here is to rip your CDs using the fastest machine on your network, then copying the ripped tracks over to the server.’

noun

  • 1A long tear or cut.

    ‘there was a rip in his sweatshirt’
    • ‘Strangely, although he had looked perfectly unharmed and very dashing while he'd been fighting, his tunic now had rips and tears all over it and his face had dirt marks all over it as if he had been struggling to win a losing battle.’
    • ‘The few pants I packed were black jeans, dark denim, or denim with rips and tears at the knee.’
    • ‘The booths were clean, but had their share of rips and cracks, as well as a few grooves of seating position.’
    • ‘Akushu looked at a fresh rip in her skirt, frowning.’
    • ‘Around every rip and tear, she saw the dark rings the blood had made in the clothing.’
    • ‘Those small rips and tears that you get on your old blue jeans and the occasional jacket can easily be fixed with a little duct tape.’
    • ‘It seemed almost all of Ralph's garments possessed at least one rip or tear, as did Jude's.’
    • ‘A starburst of gray dust exploded across the front of her shirt, but there was no tear or rip on the fabric itself.’
    • ‘Their jackets were torn - how many of those rips were slashes from knives?’
    • ‘His one-time shirt and breeches were now littered with rips and tears, and his body sorely needed a bath.’
    • ‘A jagged piece of basalt had torn a fresh rip in the hem of her robes, and a gash from the same rock was bleeding freely.’
    • ‘His clothes had no tears or rips, and his hair was still perfectly neat.’
    • ‘Small rips, tears and burns in these applied materials reveal the varying hues of the paper underneath.’
    • ‘Then you'd found it, in the lining of your jacket, inside that rip you'd created to stash money safely.’
    • ‘Anubis watched in horror as Set tore the very fabrics of reality, opening up a rip right into the Underworld.’
    • ‘There were rips, tears, and dirty patches all over them.’
    • ‘Her dress still appeared neatly in place, with no rips or tears in its fabric.’
    • ‘She loved her white sweatshirt with the flower on the front, and her blue jeans with one too many rips or tears.’
    • ‘The pants had a rip on the knee.’
    • ‘It could never be restored to its former glory, anyway; there were too many rips and tears.’
    tear, slit, split, rent, laceration, cut, gash, slash
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[in singular]An act of tearing something forcibly.
      ‘he seemed to be saying with each rip of a page—how dare she enjoy reading books?’
      • ‘Without hesitation, I gladly tore it up into many pieces, enjoying each rip and tear of the material as I let the wind blow it away.’
      • ‘He could feel the rips and tears, the little cuts opening under the movement of the shrapnel.’
      • ‘I cringed and quickly scooted across the floor, hearing the rips and tears of my gown from the nail heads in the wood.’
      • ‘I saw Pocket running towards the closed door and ran after him, tripping and hearing a horrible rip as the hem of my dress was torn.’
      • ‘The removal of each piece was punctuated by the rip of Velcro.’
      • ‘Time seemed to slow down as she fell, and as she hit the ground she felt the rip and tear of ligaments, heard the crack of bones shattering.’
      • ‘The jagged edges dug into his fingers and palm, but the pain didn't compare with the agonizing rip of his heart splitting in two.’
      • ‘I don't know when was the last time these women had a man; because my Aunt's voice was lost in the rips of these women tearing our shirts off!’
      • ‘He closed his eyes tightly as Marcell slipped a hand under his shirt and tore the material with a vicious rip.’
  • 2North American informal A fraud or swindle; a rip-off.

    • ‘If you think it's a rip, don't buy it!’
    • ‘I've seen stores selling 2000 point cards for over 25 bucks! What a rip!’
    • ‘The food is above average, wine list is good, but it's a rip for sure.’

Phrases

  • let rip

    • 1informal Do something vigorously or without restraint.

      ‘the brass sections let rip with sheer gusto’
      • ‘He gambolled away on the left before letting rip from over 25 metres, his punishing volley zipping into the net.’
      • ‘Bank of England independence and the introduction of fiscal rules after 1997 told the markets that Labour would not allow inflation to let rip, and would exercise fiscal discipline.’
      • ‘The giant grunted, his slow brain deciding when he would let rip and smother Glaucus in a deadly embrace.’
      • ‘So who can blame him for letting rip last week, after his chances of being Britain's remaining hope at the first Grand Slam of 2006, the Australian Open, crumbled before his eyes.’
      • ‘It is simply a montage of digital portraits of the students which had been transferred onto computer, with the young film-makers then letting rip and having fun.’
      • ‘It is said that the losers during the last days of a battle often let rip in appallingly brutal ways.’
      1. 1.1Express oneself vehemently or angrily.
        ‘Charlie felt he had suffered enough insults and suddenly let rip’
        • ‘Now he is letting rip on drugs, Labour, his new record company and the race for London mayor.’
        • ‘She is at her funniest when letting rip about all that is sexist and sizeist.’
        • ‘And as he was lyin' there, half dozin' and thinkin' about things, he suddenly let rip a big stale Guinness fart that rumpled the bedclothes.’
        • ‘He is sensitive, gentle and polite, which makes it all the more dramatic when he lets rip, as he often does, with a verbal flourish, about some injustice or object of his scorn.’
        • ‘Rather than letting rip in the locker-room afterwards, he stepped back.’
        • ‘It suddenly slowed up, crackled with blue electricity and let rip with a sizzling blue column of energy, followed by the plasma being dumped from the engine, completely frying the ship's shields.’
    • informal

      see rip
  • let something rip

    • 1informal Allow something, especially a vehicle, to go at full speed.

      ‘we'll get on to the motorway and let her rip’
      • ‘Drivers upset at being stuck in traffic let it rip when the road is clear.’
      • ‘If that RX has been sitting a long time, then those rotary seals will go out the first time you let it rip on the highway.’
      1. 1.1Allow something to happen forcefully or without interference.
        ‘once she started a tirade, it was best to let it rip’
        • ‘When writing a first draft, by all means let the story rip, so to speak.’
        • ‘It was supposed to help Australian workers and industry adapt to globalisation, rather than simply letting the market rip.’
        • ‘He realized the joy of being able to come into a game and throw whatever you wanted as hard as you wanted, just let it rip and not fret too terribly much over pitch selection.’
        • ‘The cause of genuine competition has never been best served by just letting markets rip.’
        • ‘Both movies would have been better if maybe they had let it rip, instead of sticking to their "This is how it would have truly been" conceit.’
        • ‘Rather, Singer essentially introduces the characters and lets us in on their powers, then lets the action rip.’
      2. 1.2Utter or express something forcefully and noisily.
        ‘when I passed the exam I let rip a ‘yippee’’
        • ‘One activity is the milkshake laugh, which involves vigorously shaking a milkshake and then letting rip a roaring laugh once the imaginary drink is finished.’
        • ‘I remember it like yesterday: getting up there, taking a deep breath like I do now, and just letting it rip.’
        • ‘Only recently have I really understood this and also understood when it's good to let those emotions rip and when to hold back and keep things balanced.’
        • ‘Once he has walked through a bulkhead door leading out of the landing bay, Halkari lets his anger rip.’
        • ‘Like some lurching wild-eyed Yeti letting rip one last agonizing death scream while uprooting everything in its path, the former behemoth known as the American Empire now looks as if it's down for the count and flat-lining fast.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • rip into

    • Make a vehement verbal attack on.

      ‘he ripped into me just for going into the caravan’
      • ‘The Kiwi was ripping into the Aussie with relish and, following a string of Wombat and Kangaroo one-liners, he began ridiculing the Australian work ethic.’
      • ‘When Kerry needed that support, those types turn on him and start ripping into him for NOT SAYING what they wanted him to say exactly the way they wanted him to say it.’
      • ‘There are undoubtedly chefs who believe reviewers go out with the express intention of ripping into a restaurant, but that doesn't tally with my experience.’
      • ‘Using the framework of the division of class, it rips into gender relationships with passionate honesty and superb brutality, challenging assumptions and uncovering uncomfortable truths.’
      • ‘The defence had been expected to rip into the witness's credibility, citing false claims in the past for sexual harassment and welfare payments.’
      • ‘Watergate was a scandal Mr. Rather thoroughly enjoyed since he built his career on ripping into Richard Nixon.’
      • ‘And once again, Michael Massing rips into what we think is the free press.’
      • ‘Bullying sergeants ripping into their soldiers might make good television, but the British army fears the reality TV show Lads Army is having a disastrous effect on efforts to recruit new troops.’
      • ‘I've never read him ripping into anyone - which as any critic will tell you - is jolly good fun once in a while.’
      • ‘O'Reilly rips into him and throws him off the show.’
      • ‘Chris had cowered about in silence as the prosecuting attorneys had gone through question after question, each ripping into him one after another.’
      • ‘I don't see ever ripping into another journalist.’
      • ‘Seacrest retaliates by ripping into Cowell's choice of car.’
      • ‘Just to be balanced, Jenkins still rips into rich bigots.’
      • ‘Chomsky rips into the scam of wiping the U.S. government's slate clean.’
  • rip someone off

    • Cheat someone, especially financially.

      ‘she thought he was ripping her off over her royalties’
      • ‘Overall, the inflation figures confirm that the Government is ripping us off.’
      • ‘It's not possible to get rich quick in the space of time that they're talking about, and do it without cheating or ripping somebody off.’
      • ‘The rugby fans after Ireland's Triple Crown victory in Dublin were ripped off by the pubs who charged exorbitant prices for drink over the weekend.’
      • ‘‘I got fed up with expensive hotels ripping me off,’ Beecham says.’
      • ‘You also don't really sound like the bitter musician who feels like the record companies have ripped you off.’
      • ‘‘The supermarkets have got to be ripping us off,’ he said.’
      • ‘When we found out he had ripped us off, we couldn't believe he had done it.’
      • ‘I later found that the young woman had ripped me off to the tune of £5 for the latter, crediting the card with £5 but charging me £10.’
      • ‘Well first the Federal Government should stop ripping us off with surpluses that see spending power just disappear from the economy into their accounting books.’
      • ‘I used to be furious at them because they kind of ripped us off financially too, but what can I say?’
      • ‘When I was in India, a carpet salesman ripped me off.’
      • ‘The other night, a friend in my building told me that she was ripped off by the restaurant across the street.’
      • ‘Whatever you do, don't seek to change a booking because you will be ripped off.’
      • ‘Is your credit card company or your banker or your broker ripping you off?’
      • ‘They said they were going to help me but instead they ripped me off, shut down the company and sold off the products.’
      • ‘It's like the corporations are saying, ‘Yeah, we're clearly ripping you off, but you have no choice but to accept it.’’
      • ‘Who else would go with us to stop Swiss Tony and his mates from ripping us off down at the used car showroom?’
      • ‘Post-Christmas sales only prove just how much you were ripped off in the Pre-Christmas hurley-burley.’
      • ‘Maybe the military purchaser doesn't know what an electrical bell costs, but the corporate contractor sure does, and that contractor is intentionally ripping us off by adding a 1400 percent markup.’
      • ‘He had an abiding distrust of people in suits since his early days in the music industry, when he took it for granted that promoters were only interested in ripping him off.’
      swindle, fleece, cheat, defraud, deceive, trick, dupe, hoodwink, double-cross, gull
      short-change
      exploit, take advantage of, victimize
      do, diddle, con, bamboozle, rob, shaft, sting, have, bilk, rook, gyp, finagle, flimflam, put one over on, pull a fast one on, take for a ride, lead up the garden path, sell down the river, pull the wool over someone's eyes
      sucker, snooker, goldbrick, gouge, stiff, give someone a bum steer
      pull a swifty on
      cozen, chicane, sell
      View synonyms
  • rip something off

    • Steal or plagiarize something.

      ‘they have ripped off £6.7 billion’
      ‘the film is a shameless collection of ideas ripped off from other movies’
      • ‘I'm not sure what Hong Kong movie this plot is ripped off from, but Quentin is involved so I'm confident it's one of them.’
      • ‘The man ripped off her copy and put it on the box, then nodded and left the way he had come.’
      • ‘The game starts when Plok notices that his favorite flag has been ripped off and taken to the neighbouring isle of Cotton Island.’
      • ‘I tuned Sparky out and started worrying about what my mother was gonna say when she found out all my stuff had been ripped off.’
      • ‘I must confess, a lot of my style is ripped off from The Simpsons.’
      • ‘I'm not using these examples as a pointer to the level of their skills, this is just a statement about the sound they've shamelessly ripped off.’
      • ‘Look at this common blog style - should we not then say it was ripped off or stolen?’
      • ‘The concepts and moves are ripped off from American videos, but now she is also looking at our stuff and picking out things.’
      • ‘An interesting thing to note with the movie is that it is ripped off in Luc Besson's Fifth Element.’
      • ‘The idea to add the clicker was ripped off from an excellent Yankee-centric site by a writer named Cecilia Tan.’
      • ‘The team's most high-profile moment came in November, when one of their engineers was interviewed by police after Ferrari claimed their data had been ripped off to design last year's Toyota.’
      • ‘He's tired of young bands ripping off sounds or relying on fashion to find an audience.’
      • ‘A drug-dealing student rips off a copy of ‘One Hundred Years of Solitude’ from a friend but probably uses it as a lap tray for snorting lines.’
      • ‘His ideas have been ripped off for years and years, and with increasing frequency.’
      • ‘With intellectual property rights, I will not accept the excuse that it is too widespread or too large-scale to handle, not until China's own products are ripped off.’
      • ‘Having higher volumes of purchased copies of Office in the home also has the effect of reducing to some extent the incidence of people ripping off copies from their business and using them at home.’
  • rip something up

    • Tear something violently into small pieces so as to destroy it.

      ‘he ripped up her pile of old letters’
      • ‘A newsagent mistakenly told them that their ticket was not a winner and the ticket was ripped up before the shop worker's error was discovered.’
      • ‘They would have taken our signs and ripped them up again this year if the police hadn't been there.’
      • ‘I snatched the piece of paper back and ripped it up quickly but not before she knew what it was.’
      • ‘I've been voting for him ever since he came on the scene and I've been a Labour Party member all my life, but I've ripped my card up and posted it back to Mr Blair.’
      • ‘I also found that one of my magazines was missing and several newspapers were ripped up.’
      • ‘So I ripped it up and threw the pieces into the river.’
      • ‘I ripped it up and put it in the trash bin at school.’
      • ‘I looked at it for quite awhile then I ripped it up and started crying even more.’
      • ‘‘There has been a bit of give and take by all three parties and now the old contract has been ripped up and there is a new one in its place,’ he says.’
      • ‘‘I got all his clothes and ripped them up and flung them into the street,’ she says.’
      • ‘Furious protesters from the genuine rally had attempted to grab the placards and rip them up, insisting it was not time for jokes.’
      • ‘The cops took sheets, ripped them up and blindfolded us, threw us into a van, and took us to a holding cell.’
      • ‘But, I've seen people I know put utility bills, or worse, bank or credit card statements, or receipts, in the bin without even ripping them up, so many times.’
      • ‘She opened the journal as she screamed and started to tear out the pages and rip them up.’
      • ‘One in ten Brits admit to simply throwing financial documents in their bin without shredding or even ripping them up, putting themselves at serious risk from ‘bin-raiding’ fraudsters.’
      • ‘She pulled down the injunctions and ripped them up in a frenzy of anger and joy.’
      • ‘Digging around in the bottom drawer where Mother kept rags, he ripped a couple up and constructed a tail, just in case it should prove necessary.’
      • ‘If a potential employer mentioned to me that my work strongly resembled another designer's, I would rip the piece up right in front of them.’
      • ‘The right side of the Apache resembled a piece of meat after a lion had ripped it up.’
      • ‘Council spokeswoman Hellen Barnes said all presiding officers had written instructions to destroy any cards that were left at the polling station by ripping them up and putting them in the black rubbish sacks provided.’
      tear, slit, cut, gash, cleave, slash, claw, savage, mangle, mutilate, hack
      View synonyms

Origin

From Latin requiescat (or, in the plural, requiescant) in pace<br>late Middle English (as a verb): of unknown origin; compare with the verb reap. The noun dates from the early 18th century.

Pronunciation:

rip

/rɪp/

Main definitions of rip in English

: RIP1rip2rip3RIP4rip5

rip3

noun

  • 1A stretch of fast-flowing and rough water in the sea or in a river, caused by the meeting of currents.

    • ‘The onslaught of the Trojan army is ‘charging in as a heavy surf roars in against the rip at a river's mouth.’’
    • ‘It's like jumping into the ocean, with the waves crushing, and if you go too far out, you might be caught in a rip.’
    1. 1.1
      ‘he felt the gut-wrenching tug of the rip as he approached the shore’
      short for rip current
      • ‘Why didn't I know about this before I entered the water, and we did check out the beach at the time, and there were no signs warning of the dangers of rips or sandbars, or any of the water conditions.’

Main definitions of rip in English

: RIP1rip2rip3RIP4rip5

RIP4

noun

  • A raster image processor.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Rasterize (an image)

    ‘once you are happy with the image, you can rip it out’
    • ‘At $50, it's a bit expensive for a copy-only application, but it rips images for storage, too.’

Origin

Late 18th century: perhaps related to rip<br>1970s: abbreviation.

Pronunciation:

RIP

/rɪp/

Main definitions of rip in English

: RIP1rip2rip3RIP4rip5

rip5

noun

informal, dated
  • 1An immoral or unpleasant person.

    ‘‘Where is that old rip?’ a deep voice shouted’
    • ‘They didn't see, and didn't want to see, the unregistered brokers and the rips - or at least, they didn't see them while the unregistered brokers were working and the rips were being charged.’
    1. 1.1A mischievous person, especially a child.
      ‘I spent hours making those skirts for you two little rips’
      • ‘You're already bad as the rest of these insolent little rips.’
  • 2A worthless horse.

Origin

Late 18th century: perhaps from rep, abbreviation of reprobate.

Pronunciation:

rip

/rɪp/