Definition of rightness in English:

rightness

noun

mass noun
  • 1The quality or state of being morally good, justified, or acceptable.

    ‘they argue for the moral rightness of overthrowing the leader by force’
    • ‘It speaks from a limbo whose inhabitants have uncomplainingly accepted the rightness of the judgement that placed them there.’
    • ‘Because authority figures emanate an aura of rightness, their actions cannot easily be challenged.’
    • ‘This broad consensus about the rightness of the war was not fundamentally eroded over the next four terrible years.’
    • ‘The producers never glossed over the rightness of the civil rights cause.’
    • ‘Prophetic language at its best recalls our moral commitments, our sense of rightness.’
    • ‘Discourse ethics tries to explain the internal relation between rational acceptability and moral rightness.’
    • ‘No nation had more confidence in the rightness of its religion than Sweden.’
    • ‘People in the world of health and medicine sometimes become carried away by the obvious rightness or righteousness of their cause.’
    • ‘These Shakers were convinced of the unique and overpowering rightness of their religion.’
    • ‘It ends up being more a plea for tolerance than a scathing indictment of self-important religious rightness.’
  • 2The quality or state of being true or correct as a fact.

    ‘they are convinced of the rightness of their theories’
    • ‘I am as sure of the rightness of mathematics as I am about anything—not totally sure, but very close.’
    • ‘The absence of doubt of the rightness of the answers looks more like religion than science.’
    • ‘Perfection here is the blissful rightness of every note.’
    • ‘Argument and logic become the sources of mathematical rightness or wrongness, rather than the teacher serving as the authority.’
    • ‘Rightness, considered in its own nature, does not belong to what I do.’
    • ‘In a precisely similar way, we see the prima facie rightness of an act which would be the fulfilment of a particular promise.’
    • ‘We are called upon to regard this as the common and immutable measure of rightness in nature.’
    • ‘Each is sure of himself and of the rightness of his views.’
    • ‘The principle of moderation, it is affirmed, is the mathematical expression for rightness.’
    • ‘There is an important difference between rightness and mathematical properties.’
    1. 2.1 The quality or state of being best or most appropriate for a particular situation.
      ‘the rightness of that move for me’
      • ‘The rightness of an action is determined by its contribution to the happiness of everyone affected by it.’
      • ‘She immediately accepted the rightness of their presence, as if she had expected them to be there all along.’
      • ‘Part of his magic is his ability to convince of the rightness of his course of action.’
      • ‘The rightness of the choice of director is apparent from the film's opening sequences at the shadow-enshrouded beach house.’
      • ‘It is up to the project leader to convince developers of the rightness of any such decisions.’
      • ‘I let the swing come to a stop and sat there transfixed by the rightness of the idea, but a little staggered at what it might entail.’
      • ‘No longer was there any doubt in her mind as to the rightness of her coming here.’
      • ‘The appropriateness and rightness of that Logos would depend precisely on the fact that there was more than one Logos available to her.’
      • ‘We respond to the object's rightness of design, which satisfies our imagination and intellect, even though we are not evaluating the object's purpose.’
      • ‘As with military strategy, rightness or wrongness is supplanted by possibility.’

Pronunciation

rightness

/ˈrʌɪtnəs/