Main definitions of riding in English

: riding1riding2

riding1

noun

  • 1[mass noun] The sport or activity of riding horses.

    ‘I found him in the stables, getting ready to go riding’
    • ‘The immediate area provides some great walking, and the house is a perfect base for fishing, golf, riding, sailing or cycling.’
    • ‘He was invited to go riding with the president at his ranch in Texas.’
    • ‘They have strict rules about proper riding gear and behavior on the trails.’
    • ‘I love dressage and I have tried basic moves with my riding teacher.’
    • ‘She had known Stuart since she was fourteen and they often went riding together.’
    • ‘Let an experienced riding instructor judge your skills and choose a horse for you.’
    • ‘If you're a keen racer, show jumper, or you just enjoy riding; nothing is better than owning your own horse.’
    • ‘On a typical day, he claimed, he would rise at seven, take a cold bath, drink a glass of milk and go riding.’
    • ‘Her riding career began when she was given a pony for her third birthday and it was soon clear that she had natural talent.’
    • ‘Riding did not just teach Elle a love for horses - it helped her learn to walk and talk again.’
    • ‘She specialises in conveyancing, probate, wills and matrimonial work, and in her spare time enjoys skiing, sailing, riding, theatre and eating out.’
    • ‘She has now vowed not to go riding in the area again until after Christmas and the New Year, when the firework season is over.’
    • ‘The exercise involved in riding helps to develop balance.’
    • ‘He thought maybe they could go riding, or hunting.’
    • ‘The guide showed us a little of the town, and we walked behind the castle to see the long walk where the queen goes riding.’
    • ‘Shortly after returning to competitive riding, she suffered a shoulder injury in June during training hours.’
    • ‘The Championships were marked by the determination of the judges to reward good training, good riding and the cooperation and obedience of the horses.’
    • ‘A big part of riding is creating a level of trust, friendship really, between a horse and rider.’
    1. 1.1[count noun]A path or track for horse riders, typically one through woods.

Pronunciation:

riding

/ˈrʌɪdɪŋ/

Main definitions of riding in English

: riding1riding2

riding2

noun

  • 1One of three former administrative divisions of Yorkshire.

    • ‘The worst were the East and West Ridings, Lincolnshire, Birmingham, Manchester and Staffordshire.’
  • 2An electoral district of Canada.

    • ‘In 1993, the Bloc captured more than two thirds of Quebec ridings and became the official opposition.’
    • ‘In this election, the NDP will largely ignore Ontario, Quebec, and all but a handful of ridings in its traditional Western base, to concentrate on trying to retain the seven seats it won in the Maritimes in 1997.’
    • ‘The best the local Liberals can hope for now is that the newly merged Conservative Party of Canada selects a no-name candidate to run in the riding of Richmond.’
    • ‘Does anyone remember when he said Liberal Party members would select candidates in their ridings by ballot in a democratic election?’
    • ‘Outraged feminist militants left the party and proceeded to dismantle the committees on the status of women that had been set up in various ridings.’
    • ‘As illustrated in Table 1, the Conservatives won these elections by winning all the ridings in which there was no substantial French-speaking population.’
    • ‘Most issues do not involve a clear choice between riding and party and it is not easy to determine majority opinion in a riding, even if its MP wanted to.’
    • ‘Because ridings have different numbers of eligible voters, the percentage of the popular vote won does not automatically translate into a proportional number of parliamentary seats won.’
    • ‘In no previous election had the Liberal share of the major party vote been more than 22% higher in the French than in the English ridings.’
    • ‘The Canada Elections Act says a person must vote in the riding where he or she ordinarily resides and not where mail is delivered.’
    • ‘While the phrase ‘assisting individual constituents’ is fairly straightforward, Docherty might have better explained exactly what services they procure for their ridings and how they do so.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, in 1,168 schools located in 267 ridings, over 265,000 students cast ballots.’
    • ‘Mr Toews has run a positive campaign and presented his ideas and his beliefs for the riding and for Canada.’
    • ‘In close ridings, voters are often forced to act against their real preferences.’
    • ‘The country is divided into districts or ridings electing one MP each.’
    • ‘The Liberals also benefited from the Alliance and the Tories splitting the right-wing vote in several Ontario ridings, though both parties have so far rejected the idea of merging.’
    • ‘‘Only if Hamm, [the Health Minister Jamie] Muir and the other ministers feel their support eroding in their own ridings will they yield,’ she said.’
    • ‘Their analysis illustrates a dramatic increase in Conservative party spending at the constituency level in francophone ridings (Carty and Eagles).’
    • ‘In response, the party decided to use tele-voting in those ridings.’
    • ‘An election in the disputed riding saw William McCullock, the man who should have been awarded the seat in the first place, lose to newcomer Victor Timbro.’

Origin

Old English trithing, from Old Norse thrithjungr third part, from thrithi third. The initial th- was lost due to assimilation with the preceding -t of East, West, or with the -th of North.

Pronunciation:

riding

/ˈrʌɪdɪŋ/