Definition of ridicule in English:

ridicule

noun

mass noun
  • The subjection of someone or something to contemptuous and dismissive language or behaviour.

    ‘he is held up as an object of ridicule’
    • ‘Therefore, if Rousseau were interested in spiritualism, during his lifetime it need not have made him an object of ridicule.’
    • ‘In this, Jane Austen's last completed work, satire and ridicule take a milder form, and the tone is more grave and tender.’
    • ‘A person who snores is often an object of ridicule and causes sleepless nights for others.’
    • ‘No government likes to have ridicule heaped upon it although this administration seems to mind it less than others.’
    • ‘But the pro-hunting Countryside Alliance said the demand would bring ridicule on the Government.’
    • ‘Sheriff William Holligan said Reilly was an object of ridicule and his treatment by officers was unprofessional.’
    • ‘Who wants to be exposed to public ridicule and contempt as part of their job description?’
    • ‘Individuals suffering panic attacks often go to great lengths to hide their symptoms because they fear ridicule.’
    • ‘Rather, it invites ridicule, contempt and cynicism towards the whole devolution project.’
    • ‘The law of libel in England is based on whether the plaintiff has suffered hatred, ridicule or contempt.’
    • ‘Beaten and bruised, he patiently endures the ridicule and scorn heaped upon him.’
    • ‘And don't forget how the Eiffel Tower was greeted with ridicule before becoming the great attraction it so surely is.’
    • ‘Others are bullied, either because they are isolated from their peers or because a sick or disabled parent is an easy object of ridicule.’
    • ‘Punishment is administered not by burning at the stake but by ridicule and contempt in the media.’
    • ‘That hasn't prevented him becoming the object of ridicule among his peers or the victim of inane questioning about his lifestyle.’
    • ‘There is a fine line sometimes between a joke, satire, ridicule and genuine defamatory ridicule.’
    • ‘How do you in practice decide whether some ridicule is reasonable and some ridicule is unreasonable?’
    • ‘If it had happened in some third world country, it would have been the object of ridicule from the press here.’
    • ‘Instead the media and the powers that be heaped scorn and ridicule upon him.’
    • ‘Never has there been such mistrust of politicians; such contempt, cynicism, ridicule.’
    mockery, derision, laughter, scorn, scoffing, contempt, jeering, sneering, sneers, jibes, jibing, joking, teasing, taunts, taunting, ragging, chaffing, twitting, raillery, sarcasm, satire, lampoon, burlesque, caricature, parody
    View synonyms

verb

[with object]
  • Subject to contemptuous and dismissive language or behaviour.

    ‘his theory was ridiculed and dismissed’
    • ‘McCann, of course, was ridiculed by the media, who refused to accept he might have a case.’
    • ‘He ridicules the notion that its members are committed to fighting poverty.’
    • ‘The satirists have quickly gone to work, ridiculing the move.’
    • ‘Without ridiculing the poet, he gently suggests Mrs Yeats must have been manipulating the spiritual dialogues for her own benign purposes.’
    • ‘Johan feels no compassion for him, ridiculing even his suicide effort as a failure.’
    • ‘Liberals and lefties, who know a thing or two about the politics of vituperation, have never held back from ridiculing conservatives.’
    • ‘The man was ridiculed, his claims dismissed, and his ethics attacked.’
    • ‘Singleton strikes the difficult balance between recapitulating stereotypes and ridiculing them in broad burlesque.’
    • ‘His presumed pragmatism upholds the status quo by ridiculing the relative few who dare to challenge it.’
    • ‘The U.S. Air Force ridiculed the idea that electromagnetic radiation could cause illness.’
    • ‘The new rules were widely ridiculed, and this reporter was among the harshest critics.’
    • ‘It is a noble and powerful impulse, one not casually to be ridiculed or dismissed.’
    • ‘Soon the day will come when I am officially bilingual, and the moment this is achieved I plan to start ridiculing unilingual people.’
    • ‘To be lampooned, or even ridiculed, is better than being ignored.’
    • ‘Finally, is it possible he is ridiculing himself?’
    • ‘Her idea for a television series based on the same idea was roundly ridiculed by TV executives.’
    • ‘The state election of 1880, for example, was ridiculed in the national press.’
    • ‘Keyes has been roundly ridiculed for his outspoken and inflexible conservatism.’
    • ‘The media has the job of challenging and confronting elected officials - and ridiculing them into the bargain.’
    • ‘While widely ridiculed, if we put normative considerations aside, she's largely right.’
    deride, mock, laugh at, heap scorn on, hold up to shame, hold up to ridicule, expose to ridicule, jeer at, jibe at, sneer at, show up, treat with contempt, scorn, make fun of, poke fun at, make jokes about, laugh to scorn, scoff at, pillory, be sarcastic about, satirize, lampoon, burlesque, caricature, parody, tease, taunt, rag, chaff, twit
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century: from French, or from Latin ridiculum, neuter (used as a noun) of ridiculus ‘laughable’, from ridere ‘to laugh’.

Pronunciation

ridicule

/ˈrɪdɪkjuːl/