Main definitions of rick in English

: rick1rick2

rick1

noun

  • 1A stack of hay, corn, straw, or similar material, especially one formerly built into a regular shape and thatched.

    • ‘A few hens, questing for food under a rick, stole away under a gate at her approach.’
    • ‘Church bells came in handy also when I worked in the meadow as a lad, holding my pike and walking around it in circles while the men pitched the hay at my feet and the rick of golden threads steadily rose to its conical fullness.’
    • ‘The thresher was due in one hour, and a base, known as a ‘butt’ had to be made for the rick of straw.’
    • ‘Webster defines a rick simply as a pile, and truck sizes obviously vary tremendously, so it is very important that you get all of this straight with the seller before agreeing on a price; there is much room for misunderstanding.’
    • ‘The rattle of empty bottles into a wooden crate, awoke me, and I noticed that every man was in great humour, the rick was being combed down by two men with long handled rakes.’
    • ‘Our first night on the march, the General and his staff all climbed into a straw rick and passed a restful, if short, night.’
    haystack, rick, hayrick, stook, mow, haymow, barleymow
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    1. 1.1North American A pile of firewood somewhat smaller than a cord.
    2. 1.2North American A set of shelving for storing barrels.
      • ‘Alison heard the sound of ricks shifting and the floor beneath them was beginning to shake.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Form into a rick or ricks; stack.

    ‘the nine cords of good spruce wood ricked up in the back yard’
    sprain, twist, rick, wrench
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Origin

Old English hrēac, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch rook.

Pronunciation:

rick

/rɪk/

Main definitions of rick in English

: rick1rick2

rick2

noun

  • A slight sprain or strain, especially in a person's neck or back.

    ‘the screen tilter lets you play the game flat without developing a permanent rick in your neck’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
  • Strain (one's neck or back) slightly.

    ‘I whirled so quickly that I nearly ricked my neck’
    • ‘When Glenn McGrath ricked his ankle while stepping on a stray cherry in Australia's pre-match warm-up, the façade of fear that had been erected during the Lord's debacle was torn down in an instant.’
    • ‘You'd eventually get fired when the tightrope walker wouldn't go on because he'd ricked his ankle - but of course on paper it would say that ‘Stephen didn't meet targets.’’
    • ‘They have met seven times in all and, so far, Federer has only managed to win once - and that was when Henman had ricked his neck and had to pull out after a set.’
    • ‘But he ricked his neck with his third attempt and was forced to pull out of the discus and shot.’
    • ‘I spent last week popping Ibroprufen, cold powders and the muscle relaxants I need now that I have developed the habit of ricking my back when laid up in bed.’
    • ‘Vickery, who has missed his club's past two matches after ricking his back during the warm-up before the Powergen Cup quarter-final against Saracens, said: ‘I am in pieces at the moment and the injury is a worry.’’
    • ‘Flintoff, handed the captaincy when Warren Hegg woke up with a ricked neck, said: ‘Cricket is a great leveller.’’
    • ‘However, Dolan's fortunes took a dramatic slump with the loss of Fox to a foot injury, luckless wideman Craig Skinner to a ricked neck and young Marc Thompson, who turned his ankle.’
    • ‘As for the rides, well… I got soaked on the thrilling log flumes, ricked my neck on the Gauntlet - a wild loop-the-loop rollercoaster - and felt nauseous on the Galleon.’
    • ‘This is a useful skill for rapidly reading rows upon rows of pay and display tickets in car parks without ricking my neck or having to do handstands.’
    • ‘He's only gone and ricked his ankle in a charity football match.’
    • ‘Now, after Jacob Oram ricked his back, yet another twist in the tale as McMillan was recalled!’
    • ‘But just when Davenport looked like sweeping all before her, she ricked her back at the start of the clay-court season and hasn't been the same since.’
    • ‘Captain Warren Hegg, who missed the Cheltenham and Gloucester Trophy game at Chelmsford with a ricked neck, reckons he will be okay for tomorrow.’
    • ‘During the changeover Arazi receives treatment on his ricked neck and a Mexican Wave ripples round Centre Court as the crowd amuses itself.’
    • ‘When the side was in the Caribbean, Vaughan and Marcus Trescothick were the men in possession and had Vaughan not ricked a knee in the Lord's nets three days before the first Test of the summer, they might still be now.’
    injure, hurt, damage, impair
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Origin

Late 18th century (as a verb): of dialect origin.

Pronunciation:

rick

/rɪk/