Definition of reverend in English:

reverend

adjective

  • Used as a title or form of address to members of the clergy.

    ‘the Reverend Pat Tilly’
    • ‘The reverend Nicolas Morgan, vicar of St George's Church in Lower Brailes, paid tribute to the hard work of villagers.’
    • ‘No more scriptures, reverend, and no more discussions about my supposed duties.’
    • ‘This time he was answering questions from attorneys representing people who claim they were sexually abused by reverend Paul Shanley.’
    • ‘The school will be blessed by Right Reverend Mons. Francis V. Lynn P.P. V.G. representing Most Reverend Dr. John Fleming, Bishop of Killala.’
    • ‘The addition of two characters to Conan Doyle's original story (the reverend Kerr and his ward Agnes) works well and enhances this diversity.’
    • ‘‘Thank you Reverend Mother!’ replied Miri, flushing at the commendation.’
    • ‘Since moving to Jerry Falwell's home turf in Lynchburg, Va., in September, openly gay reverend Mel White and his partner, Gary Nixon, are the social butterflies of the neighborhood.’
    • ‘Also, the reverend Jan Lookingbill from Emmanuel Lutheran Church, which Rehnquist attended when he lived in Bethesda, Maryland, will also participate in that service.’
    • ‘I can almost hear many a reverend pastor's groaning response.’
    • ‘And I wanted to tell John Clay before he made my appointment with you, reverend abbot.’
    • ‘Yes, there's been a little help from the Reverend Al Green but don't hold that against me.’
    • ‘Since that seems obvious, though, reverend, what's the point in prolonging the race?’
    • ‘Well, reverend, you have definitely put your faith into action.’
    • ‘You, reverend, you personally are hindering them.’
    • ‘Thanks very much, reverend, but I think I'll stick to my earth-bound Toyota Yaris.’
    • ‘‘The Reverend Mother has a lot of lines,’ she said.’
    • ‘And there's no doubt that the good Reverend certainly lead by example.’
    • ‘I'm sorry, reverend abbot, I mean no disrespect.’
    • ‘Now, you would think that the Reverend, being a reverend and all, would have castigated Adam for his unholy alliance with MaryAnn, but he didn't.’
    • ‘Thank you reverend, and may God continue to bless you.’

noun

informal
  • A member of the clergy.

    ‘a retired reverend’
    • ‘He was a black Anglican reverend who was gay, but not openly gay, but everyone knows he's gay.’
    • ‘My appeal to all pastors, bishops, reverends and other church leaders, is that they should not sell their birthright to any organisation for the sake of money.’
    • ‘All the big men shop here, from reverends to rappers, the Eagles and their rotund coach, a few extra-large Sixers, visiting players and others from the super-wealthy set.’
    • ‘When I was nineteen years old, I parted from the church even though my father was the reverend.’
    • ‘Speaking of finding a silver lining, it always seems like chaplains, reverends, ministers, bishops, they always try to find the positive in any type of disaster.’
    • ‘It appears this reverend is stepping outside his usual sector.’
    • ‘I know that my father, the reverend of Bishopdale, would certainly like me to pass on his regards, too.’
    • ‘He describes the conduct of one reverend, Mr. Rigby Hopkins, whom he considers the greatest religious hypocrite.’
    • ‘‘I was actually ordained a reverend on the Universal Ministries website from Illinois, the same one that Robbie Williams used to be ordained,’ she told the Diary.’
    • ‘‘We've never had a case where a reverend or a pastor had committed murder,’ said Matt Bingham, chief felony prosecutor for Smith County.’
    • ‘A general parish meeting could be a fountain of fine ideas and not at all as vexing as some of the reverends might shudder to contemplate.’
    • ‘This is the worst thing they could find to say about this gay reverend to attack him?’
    • ‘The preacher was a popular southern evangelic reverend who was talking about being saved.’
    • ‘I love all the great ministers, the great reverends, the great rabbis, the great imams, though as I said, I personally have a problem with organized religion.’
    • ‘Recently, Lee-Chin was the guest of a notable Harlem Baptist reverend who told him that natives there were being displaced as a result of the middle classes moving in and the consequent gentrification of Harlem.’
    • ‘All the thousands of priests, reverends, parsons, ministers, etc. that make a living from talking about their god, claim that giving money to them will ‘help’ their god.’
    • ‘Academics from US Ivy League universities have written to protest, along with rabbis, pastors, reverends and mullahs as well as the International Young Christian Workers' movement.’
    • ‘The services will be conducted there by a number of various reverends, including one that Chief Rehnquist was very close to.’
    • ‘One American reverend has established a group for families of servicemen.’
    • ‘I think what the reverend is talking about is patent nonsense.’

Usage

As a title Reverend is used for members of the clergy; the traditionally correct form of address is the Reverend James Smith or the Reverend J. Smith, rather than Reverend Smith or simply Reverend. Other words are prefixed in titles of more senior clergy: bishops are Right Reverend, archbishops are Most Reverend, and deans are Very Reverend

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin reverendus ‘person to be revered’, gerundive of revereri (see revere).

Pronunciation

reverend

/ˈrɛv(ə)r(ə)nd/