Definition of revamp in English:

revamp

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Give new and improved form, structure, or appearance to.

    ‘an attempt to revamp the museum's image’
    ‘a revamped magazine’
    • ‘The two major shopping malls in the area have now been revamped and upgraded.’
    • ‘Instead, they now are aggressively revamping the educational system.’
    • ‘Coles is later than Woolies in revamping its logistics chain, so the gains aren't apparent yet.’
    • ‘Olson says that he'll be revamping the dance formats throughout the summer.’
    • ‘The main emphasis will be on improving the condition of buildings and revamping facilities including toilets, roofing and drainage.’
    • ‘A leading Yorkshire theatre is revamping its season ticket scheme in the hope of attracting thousands of new visitors.’
    • ‘Next on the agenda is revamping the front of the school.’
    • ‘The owners cannot begin revamping the building until insurance companies have surveyed the damage, which could take the whole of January.’
    • ‘To start with, corporate culture and attitude from top to bottom have to be revamped in this direction.’
    • ‘It had such a following when it came out that they revamped the whole thing and put in Morgan Freeman to narrate it.’
    • ‘A heavily revamped Saturday lineup drew wildly mixed reviews.’
    • ‘I'm planning on revamping my wardrobe over the next two weeks.’
    • ‘Sugar Ray are the best example of a band selling out as they revamp their image.’
    • ‘Putting the hardest job first, Republicans placed revamping Social Security at the top of the list.’
    • ‘Warehouses on River Street overlooking St Peter's Way will be revamped to create modern offices.’
    • ‘If they're worried about readership, CanWest should consider revamping Metro's design.’
    • ‘Once a commitment is made to addressing diversity, the educator can begin revamping the curriculum.’
    • ‘A number of Sir Michael's movie classics have been revamped for modern audiences.’
    • ‘Over recent years, the Waterford store has been continuously revamped and upgraded.’
    • ‘Once the new Sonata hits the road, Hyundai wants to revamp its entire lineup.’
    renovate, redecorate, refurbish, recondition, rehabilitate, rebuild, reconstruct, overhaul, make over
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1usually in singular An act of improving the form, structure, or appearance of something.

    ‘the brand was given a $1 million revamp’
    • ‘The biggest food store in Southend town centre will shut for a week while a multi-million pound revamp is completed.’
    • ‘Next on the list will be a complete revamp of the arrivals concourse.’
    • ‘The charity has been planning the long-awaited revamp for nearly five years.’
    • ‘The Tamil channel has since then undergone a major revamp, like programming mix and so on.’
    • ‘AN £11 million revamp of York's bus service is in doubt as drivers today prepared for strike action.’
    • ‘Plans for a multi-million pound revamp of Beckenham Hospital are being unveiled.’
    • ‘The 30 million revamp of Bolton's Market Hall has been given the final go-ahead.’
    • ‘Geraldton's public transport system is undergoing a major revamp.’
    • ‘Director of arts, heritage and leisure Jane Glaister said measures had already been taken, including a revamp of the front of the centre, floodlighting, and help in submitting bids for major funding.’
    • ‘The move effects all of the 40 support staff workers at the Deane School - including secretaries, caretakers, and technicians - as the school undergoes a revamp.’
    • ‘Posh person's bank Coutts is planning an image revamp in a bid to attract new money.’
    • ‘A Bradford park is to be cleaned up ahead of a massive revamp.’
    • ‘What is needed is a complete revamp of the service and of health boards.’
    • ‘The hostel underwent a major revamp towards the end of last year.’
    • ‘Some even whispered about a complete revamp of the organisation.’
    • ‘The hall is part of a multi-million pound revamp of leisure facilities in the borough.’
    • ‘The revamp has freed up redundant space and we are hoping there will be even more sessions as a result.’
    • ‘The £10 million revamp of Piccadilly Gardens was originally due to be opened before Christmas.’
    • ‘Detailed plans for a £5.2 million revamp of a Shipley supermarket have been submitted to Council officials.’
    • ‘A £50 million revamp of part of Bury town centre could start next year.’
    reorganization, restructuring, rearrangement, change, reshuffle, regrouping, redistribution, overhaul, revamp, makeover
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A new and improved version.
      ‘the show was a revamp of an old idea’
      • ‘The new theme tune turned out to be a revamp of the old nineties intro, complete with pulsating orange skyscrapers.’
      • ‘He had to worry about the price that he had to pay for charcoal, the cost of the iron he was about to use and the time it took him to forge any given item, even if it was a revamp of an older piece.’
      • ‘Novell today lifted the veil on some of the features that will come with the next major revamp of SuSE Linux - version 9.1 - due out in May.’
      • ‘A lot has been made about how this new version of The Italian Job is a revamp/ reworking/ reimagining of its Michael Caine-starring predecessor.’
      • ‘Vehicle dealers from all over the county exhibited cars, from the latest retro revamp Citroen C3 to Jack Villeneuve's old Honda Formula One racer.’
      • ‘It's a much-loved old TV series that's had a hip revamp for the big screen.’
      • ‘Spy Hunter is a revamp of the old, old arcade game, in which your souped-up car would take on all manner of villains on the wide open roads.’

Pronunciation

revamp

/riːˈvamp/