Definition of retitle in English:

retitle

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Give a different title to.

    ‘many of the tales were retitled’
    with object and complement ‘Hemingway retitled his story ‘The Snows of Kilimanjaro’’
    • ‘Baxter's role was primarily as a producer, but he did direct a final re-make of Doss House, retitled Judgment Deferred and featuring a debut performance by Joan Collins.’
    • ‘In 1991, a separate office within the Ocean Service of NOAA was retitled the Coast and Geodetic Survey.’
    • ‘Lacking the financial resources to defend itself in court, the Seal Press settled the suit, agreeing to retitle the book and redesign the cover of subsequent editions.’
    • ‘Moll's film may well owe its inspiration to Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train, and this film could just as easily be slyly retitled The Trouble With Harry.’
    • ‘There is scant excuse for Regina Taylor to transpose the play, retitled Drowning Crow, to South Carolina's Gullah Islands, its language cloudier, its subtleties flattened out.’
    • ‘Change, as the bonus disc is retitled, strips away most of the orchestral overkill, but the songs still sound empty, their joy curdling into bitterness.’
    • ‘The writing of Across the River and into the Trees (or Across the Street and into the Grill as E.B. White retitled it) drew on his wartime experiences and seemed to merge his exaggerations with his fictional hero to the point of self-parody.’
    • ‘‘The retitling of the Army School of Signals does not change the unit's role or its focus but better recognises the corps identity and the unit's heritage,’ he said.’
    • ‘Wang's So Close to Paradise was officially withheld for three years before being recut and retitled for its debut at Cannes in 1998.’
    • ‘On the heels of Calvin Tomkins's recent biographical treatment, we have now another by Alice Goldfarb Marquis - itself the retitled and considerably revised version of an earlier study from 1980.’
    • ‘It was a project that outlived the lead actor, and remained a work in progress for so many years that Welles eventually threatened to retitle it When Are You Going To Finish Don Quixote?’
    • ‘In 1833 he published Poems, Songs and Sonnets (the sonnets of which were much praised), and in the same year his unfinished Biographia Borealis, retitled Worthies of Yorkshire and Lancashire in 1836.’
    • ‘In this September 1965 version, Hughes made several significant changes: retitling the poem, dropping the memorial notation to Till, and compressing three stanzas into one.’
    • ‘Were brevity not a concern, I would urge Fuchs to retitle his paper ‘Health and Government, and the Prescriptions of Irving Fisher.’’
    • ‘Thomas Kitts writes about Ray Davies's one-man show, which was originally called 20th Century Man, before being retitled Storyteller.’
    • ‘The retitled Tarnopol pictures appear in a section of the new exhibition called ‘Photos as Historical Sources’.’
    • ‘Well, I've only read one book about a bird before, Barry Hines's heartbreaking A Kestrel for a Knave, later retitled Kes to tie in with Ken Loach's film adaptation of that name.’
    • ‘The All-Story (later retitled All-Story Weekly) ran until 1920, an all-fiction pulp-paper magazine that sold for the bargain price of ten cents for 192 pages.’
    • ‘The first half closes with a faithful version of Tom Waits’ " Martha ", retitled here " Those Were Days of Roses".’
    • ‘The gestation, shooting, and tragic pre-release tampering of the retitled Major Dundee is almost as exciting - and frustrating - as the film itself.’

Pronunciation

retitle

/riːˈtʌɪt(ə)l/