Definition of resuscitate in English:

resuscitate

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Revive (someone) from unconsciousness or apparent death.

    ‘an ambulance crew tried to resuscitate him’
    • ‘They tried to resuscitate William a little and gave him some water.’
    • ‘Once families received indications that it was safe to leave, they wanted to know what was going on and then turned over their trust to the staff to do the job of resuscitating the families' loved ones.’
    • ‘By the time I got down there, they had been trying to resuscitate her for five minutes.’
    • ‘Swiftly the man who saved the young Morgan went through the process of resuscitating him, breathing air back into the boy's body, trying to get his lungs working again, in hopes of getting the water out of him.’
    • ‘Although she was resuscitated, she lost the ability to use her left hand.’
    • ‘A lifeguard, followed by Adair, came running to help laying Azara's limp body on the soft white sand and started the pouring oxygen back into her lungs and resuscitating her.’
    • ‘They take his body aboard their spacecraft and proceed to try to resuscitate him, completely unaware of who he is.’
    • ‘The life support machine clicked about attempting to resuscitate him, but to no avail.’
    • ‘Consider that, for decades, clinicians used local standards for resuscitating patients in cardiac arrest.’
    • ‘We tried to resuscitate him as there was a possibility he could make it.’
    • ‘He snatches her body from the current, resuscitates her, then brings her to his late father's house.’
    • ‘Again she tried to resuscitate her, performing CPR or anything else she thought would work.’
    • ‘They expect the team to do its job in resuscitating patients and to provide care after resuscitation.’
    • ‘Lifeguards were alerted to exactly where the girl was, and were able to pull her out and resuscitate her.’
    • ‘I also requested a stand for the oxygen tank because the tank we used fell over while we were resuscitating the patient.’
    • ‘Vigorous efforts were made to resuscitate him, but on examination he was found to be dead.’
    • ‘All hands would have turned to the priority of resuscitating the patient.’
    • ‘Xena quickly set Sabrina's body on the sand and began trying to resuscitate her.’
    • ‘Calynna pressed down on Blaise's chest, hoping to resuscitate him.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, they spent an hour trying to resuscitate William.’
    bring round, revive, bring back, bring to life, bring back to life, bring someone to their senses, bring someone back to their senses, bring back to consciousness, rescue, save, bring back from the edge of death
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    1. 1.1 Make (something) active or vigorous again.
      ‘measures to resuscitate the ailing economy’
      • ‘It resuscitated the home-building industry, ended the shortage of dwelling units, alleviated civic panic, and boosted municipal revenues.’
      • ‘The association would like to resuscitate the activity so that it contributed to national development and had plans to initiate a re-stocking exercise through which it would distribute the indigenous species to fish farmers, he said.’
      • ‘The film-makers should be given full marks for resuscitating this story and bringing it to the screen.’
      • ‘George's writing is best viewed as an attempt to correct the flaws of classical political economy and to resuscitate it.’
      • ‘Hayek has been credited with resuscitating the Swiss watch making industry since the 1980s.’
      • ‘Like a number of recent American poets who have done a lot to resuscitate genre, narrative, wit, and craft, the student said there needs to be a development of traditional techniques and genres to create more public forms.’
      • ‘Have you ever tried to resuscitate a bankrupt restaurant?’
      • ‘The pond is not resuscitated nor is the scum removed for further study.’
      • ‘He said his ministry was concerned at the demise of industries in the country and would try to put up measures that would help resuscitate them.’
      • ‘There is much to ponder in Evans's paper that resuscitates many ideas from Arthur Holmes of a generation ago.’
      • ‘To back their legal challenge, the plaintiffs have resuscitated some troubling arguments: they hint that Kennewick Man may have been here before the ancestors of contemporary Native Americans.’
      • ‘Roger's ego is soon resuscitated when he receives a surprise visit from his sixteen-year-old nephew, Nick, who needs some help in dealing with the ladies.’
      • ‘Its cost-cutting and route-cutting efforts to date are devoid of the genius and drive that would resuscitate the train as a preferred mode of transportation between major city pairs throughout the country.’
      • ‘There was no prototype, no blueprint for resuscitating a town.’
      • ‘Creating a game by resuscitating the story from a 20-year-old movie certainly is a daunting task.’
      • ‘In the endeavor to resuscitate Rome's art scene after World War II, few were more enterprising and none more precocious than Piero Dorazio.’
      • ‘While reflation does resuscitate the economy to an extent and lift consumer spending, consumers have a relentless tendency to take on even more debt in different forms.’
      • ‘And although street clocks went out of vogue in the 1920s, Verdin resuscitated the analog timepieces in the 1980s for small towns undergoing Main Street revivals.’
      • ‘I felt less anxious then than I did during high school because of having resuscitated my passion for writing.’
      • ‘He however spoke highly of musicians for their efforts in resuscitating Zambian music saying ‘It is good that everybody is doing their best in our industry.’’
      revive, resurrect, restore, regenerate, revitalize, breathe new life into, give the kiss of life to, give a new lease of life to, reinvigorate, renew, awaken, wake up, rejuvenate, stimulate, re-establish, reinstitute, relaunch
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 16th century: from Latin resuscitat- ‘raised again’, from the verb resuscitare, from re- ‘back’ + suscitare ‘raise’.

Pronunciation

resuscitate

/rɪˈsʌsɪteɪt/