Definition of restriction in English:

restriction

noun

often restrictions
  • 1A limiting condition or measure, especially a legal one.

    ‘planning restrictions on commercial development’
    • ‘The movement's main thrust, however, was to seek legislative restriction of the liquor traffic.’
    • ‘To make matters worse, fuel shortages put restrictions on how far people could travel.’
    • ‘Aren't free markets supposed to need a free flow of capital and labour, and not restrictions of labour mobility?’
    • ‘Before you apply for any new savings account, check the terms and conditions for any catches or restrictions.’
    • ‘One feature that is absent from current regulation is any general restriction on campaign expenditure.’
    • ‘No aquatic herbicide is currently approved for submerged weed control that does not place some restriction on the use of the treated water.’
    • ‘It would be more difficult to introduce the restrictions later, having first learned the game without them.’
    • ‘Prices are not guaranteed, but imports are constrained by levies and restrictions.’
    • ‘Then in the 1970's travel restrictions were eased and she was able to come to the United States.’
    • ‘There were significant restrictions on the freedom of individuals to question or reject church doctrine.’
    • ‘This restriction is not law, there is no regulation maintaining secrecy of the discussions in the room.’
    • ‘Legal restrictions on who could buy a book, visit a museum, hear a concert were gradually lifted.’
    • ‘Are restrictions imposed on foreign nationals opening a bank account?’
    • ‘There are no legal restrictions on who can marry except for marriages between close relatives.’
    • ‘A recent form of regulatory water-use restriction is the imposition of specific water-use technologies in building codes.’
    • ‘There are ten of us, and we are the ones that look over every new law and restriction that the government proposes.’
    • ‘It also means that you can now apply for credit without the restrictions a bankruptcy order imposes.’
    • ‘Often the speed restrictions in rural villages extend out into the countryside.’
    • ‘In rural areas, women must contend with cultural and legal restrictions on health care.’
    • ‘He examines how campaigns work and what restrictions are placed on them by legislation and public opinion.’
    reduction, limitation, diminution, curtailment, cutback, cut, scaling down
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1mass noun The limitation or control of someone or something, or the state of being restricted.
      ‘the restriction of local government power’
      • ‘This process of simplification and hybridization involves reduction of linguistic resources and restriction of use to such limited functions as trade.’
      • ‘Agreements which have as their object or effect the prevention, restriction or distortion of competition within the common market are prohibited.’
      • ‘Where the risk is assessed as not high, quarantine restriction will apply for 21 days with regular veterinary visits undertaken.’
      • ‘The question then is whether these three potential markers for ageing linked to calorie restriction also apply to humans.’
      limitation, limit, constraint, control, check, curb
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin restrictio(n-), from restringere ‘bind fast, confine’ (see restrict).

Pronunciation

restriction

/rɪˈstrɪkʃ(ə)n/