Main definitions of rescript in English

: rescript1rescript2

rescript1

noun

  • 1An official edict or announcement.

    ‘the tsar published a rescript which brought the government's reformist intentions into the public domain’
    • ‘Promulgated in 1890 ostensibly for the edification of Japanese students, the Imperial Rescript on Education was distributed to all schools in Japan, to be hung alongside Emperor Meiji's portrait.’
    • ‘‘If the broadcast of the surrender rescript had not been implemented, the Japanese military's fighting spirit would have been maintained, leading its armed forces to continue fighting on many battlefields,’ he said.’
    • ‘At the Aug.14 supreme council meeting, the emperor asked the councilors to prepare the capitulation rescript, saying, ‘If we continue the war, Japan will be altogether annihilated.’’
    • ‘At noon, the recording of the rescript was broadcast, and the nation heard the emperor's voice announcing Japan's final capitulation.’
    • ‘Two Japanese Imperial Army generals foiled an attempted coup instigated by a dozen officers to block the broadcasting of Emperor Hirohito's surrender rescript at the end of World War II.’
    announcement, statement, communication, pronouncement, proclamation, memorandum, bulletin, communiqué, dispatch, report, edict, manifesto
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1historical A Roman emperor's written reply to an appeal for guidance, especially on a legal point.
      • ‘Without Pliny's letter, we would have misunderstood the meaning of Trajan's reply to it. Yet, Hadrian's rescript makes two essential points clear.’
      • ‘The Emperor's reply, called a rescript, had the full force of law and was preserved also in the archives of the province.’
      • ‘The second Roman expedition leads directly to the Rescript of Honorius, the document with force of law with which the Western Roman emperor, Honorius, directed Britain's local authorities to take arms and defend themselves, in the course of the turmoil of 410AD.’
      • ‘Honorius' rescript (written answer) told the Britons to undertake their own defence, which as we have seen they did with success.’
      • ‘But the most practically important direction in the Emperor's rescript referred to the anonymous informations. All proceedings founded on them were to be annulled.’
    2. 1.2 The Pope's decision on a question of Roman Catholic doctrine or papal law.
      • ‘When the Papal Rescript was published in 1888, he publicly maintained that papal infallibility did not cover politics.’
      • ‘In October [Agnesi] received a papal rescript confirming her appointment.’
      • ‘It has already been explained that the Papal rescript condemning the plan of campaign and the practice of boycotting is not an utterance ex cathedra.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a papal decision): from Latin rescriptum, neuter past participle of rescribere ‘write back’, from re- ‘back’ + scribere ‘write’.

Pronunciation

rescript

/ˈriːskrɪpt/

Main definitions of rescript in English

: rescript1rescript2

rescript2

verb

[with object]
  • Revise or rewrite.

    ‘this move forced Forsyth to rescript the scene’
    figurative ‘I wish we could rescript the last two days’
    • ‘There were some extraordinary scenarios and rescripting and some very ordinary scenarios and rescripting.’
    • ‘Reworked and rescripted under George Barrington's famous name, the Narrative cleverly used some of his turns of phrase carefully noted from various trials speeches.’
    • ‘The history of To Kill a King is one of unpaid wages and bills, corner-cutting, reshooting and rescripting on the hoof, computer-generated miracles, bafflingly complicated funding deals and bankruptcy, not once but twice.’
    • ‘"Sure, we can rescript a game if there's six figures at stake, but you always need to retain credibility," Barrett says.’
    • ‘Post-riot Los Angeles is rescripted in Rush Hour as a multicultural utopia and a capitalist's dream.’
    • ‘Reworked, rescripted and recast during the shoot, the film became legendary long before its release.’
    • ‘It can literally rescript the pre-conscious mind, stripping away negative expectations and self doubt, and replacing these destructive patterns with positive input, thereby bringing about positive changes to people's lives in an effortless and natural way from the inside out.’
    • ‘Only decades later would singer Marian Anderson's Easter Sunday concert in 1939 and Martin Luther King Jr.'s final speech at the March on Washington in 1963 begin to "rescript the meaning of the Lincoln Memorial as an icon for civil rights."’
    • ‘Finally, there's the much-awaited 'Maha', directed by Ravi Radha, co-starring Kiran, which is being rescripted.’
    • ‘In Eliot's appropriation of the legend, however, the narrative of masculine attainment is rescripted as an initiation ritual.’
    • ‘When collectively performed, cultural fixes may contribute to a 'rescripting' of social life and hence to social transformation.’
    • ‘Ed's been a great collaborator, too - he let me rescript one or two things quite freely.’
    • ‘Thus one consequence of subversion, of women rescripting their roles, is added complexity.’
    • ‘Then they get to rescript events in a way that sees them in control, and to visualize the new version before bedtime.’
    • ‘But if Friel set out as well to rescript the role of Cathleen Ni Houlihan in the way I am maintaining, the title role necessitated being written for a woman, in particular a woman who is also the daughter of an Irishman, the wife of an Irishman, and the patient of a male Irish doctor.’
    revise, recast, rework, reword, rephrase, redraft
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Pronunciation

rescript

/riːˈskrɪpt/