Definition of requisite in English:

requisite

adjective

  • Made necessary by particular circumstances or regulations:

    ‘the application will not be processed until the requisite fee is paid’
    • ‘Since he has passed the requisite security check, the Bureau has obviously forgotten about the incident, but the informant, if still alive, could destroy Michael's chances.’
    • ‘The appraisal shows sufficient equity to bring payments current, escrow several months into the future and handle taxes and insurance as well as all the substantial requisite fees for the lender.’
    • ‘It's a Paris of the '60s - that most tumultuous and sentimentalized of decades - and comes with all the requisite anger, anxiousness and idealism.’
    • ‘A man condemned in his own day for his sexual practices and lascivious writings, after his death he was crowned patron saint of the Surrealists, but was also requisite bedside reading for many a serial killer.’
    • ‘After 1982, anyone who wanted to operate a radio station had to fill out the requisite forms, buy the necessary equipment, and start broadcasting on a given FM frequency.’
    • ‘I can't think what it would cost to furnish a single shot with, say, a street full of period cars, all polished or dirtied up to the requisite degree of authenticity.’
    • ‘Inevitably, he's been given the less interesting of the two roles and does his best with it, hitting the requisite notes of sarcasm, brutality and integrity.’
    • ‘The rub is that I don't feel the requisite sensations, and never have, in the presence of the paintings themselves.’
    • ‘Scott trained at the Welsh College of Music and Drama, and suffered the requisite years of unemployment before breaking through.’
    • ‘However, only a few of the dozen-strong cast have the requisite style to make the parody trenchant instead of merely silly.’
    • ‘A Salient Editor needs to have a strong vision, and the requisite traits to make that vision a reality.’
    • ‘However, government's policies need to be in tandem with the strategic imperatives of the nation brand in order to reap the requisite synergies.’
    • ‘Faltering asset prices would have at some point stymie requisite Credit growth and the house of cards would have come tumbling down.’
    • ‘Henry, after the requisite period of lying deathly pale in bed and mopping his face on the sheets, recovers.’
    • ‘At the end of some of the early numbers, there was a sticky few seconds of silence before the requisite applause began.’
    • ‘Regardless of the precautions you take, your requisite insurance does not necessarily have to be expensive.’
    • ‘A wedding is in many ways the penultimate dramatic premise - a family gathering on a large scale that is invariably accompanied by significant tensions, along with the requisite celebrations.’
    • ‘And nowhere is simplicity more requisite than when selling technology to mainstream consumers.’
    • ‘Charlie's Angels is a film that never takes the requisite conventions and demands of traditional narrative film-making too much to heart.’
    • ‘To refute Gearty in the requisite detail would demand an article longer than his, so I shall just raise some questions.’
    necessary, required, prerequisite, essential, indispensable, vital, needed, needful
    compulsory, obligatory, mandatory, stipulated, demanded, called-for, imperative
    de rigueur
    View synonyms

noun

  • A thing that is necessary for the achievement of a specified end:

    ‘she believed privacy to be a requisite for a peaceful life’
    • ‘‘I have read that it was a saying of an ancient Greek that the first requisite for happiness was to be born in a famous city,’ he writes.’
    • ‘The UK government is attempting to illegally put the frighteners on smokers buying their requisites over the Internet, a dot.com has alleged.’
    • ‘But it's that unclear set of requisites that makes a meeting between the empowered and the disenfranchised so impossible.’
    • ‘They are assumed to stock merchandise comprising all food groups plus basic household requisites such as soaps and cleaning materials.’
    • ‘So as if anyone informed on us, they wouldn't find the larger distill further down the creek which we had with the sugar and all the other requisites for that.’
    • ‘To begin with, Eisenman was not an alcoholic, as seems requisite for English intellectuals, but more properly a neurotic.’
    • ‘Most techno performers find the requisites of rock band culture inappropriate to their needs.’
    • ‘Thus although not as technologically driven as the modern world, the ancient and classical world none the less possessed all of the requisites for a realist international relations of power politics.’
    • ‘But we are all intensely aware of the fact that work and its corollary, employment, are essential requisites for most people to be able to live in dignity with at least a minimum of comfort and security.’
    • ‘The requisites always involve compromise, straddling, being here and there, some of the Anglo and some of the Latino culture, old world traditions and new ways of thinking about them.’
    • ‘In fact, requisites for the intertwined interests in cultural survival and sustainable resource management might look something like the following list.’
    • ‘It should be clear that the Fekete plan is the most desirable of the four because it solves the problem of credit in a non-inflationary way, and it comports with the requisites of a free and just society.’
    • ‘Bold, aggressive, and controversial actions are likely to be requisites to save the island fox from extinction.’
    • ‘We argue that Henry lacked the requisites for effective political leadership.’
    • ‘We designers should learn to understand that end-users each have their own set of preferences, prejudices, and requisites.’
    • ‘The requisites for obtaining a facility installation permit are set out in Division 6.’
    • ‘The idea has to be written down, and a document has to be created defining all the requisites for the new quest.’
    • ‘In contrast, numerous historians wrote that they considered ‘presidential personality and character’ to be critical requisites.’
    • ‘The interdependence between them creates a relationship that extends beyond the requisites of quality, price, delivery and service.’
    • ‘For a composer to take part in building up a national style in this way, there were two requisites; he must have original power within himself, and he must have national musical traits to work upon.’
    necessity, essential requirement, prerequisite, essential, precondition, specification, stipulation
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin requisitus searched for, deemed necessary, past participle of requirere (see require).

Pronunciation

requisite

/ˈrɛkwɪzɪt/