Main definitions of repose in English

: repose1repose2

repose1

noun

  • 1[mass noun] A state of rest, sleep, or tranquillity.

    ‘in repose her face looked relaxed’
    • ‘Balanced sonorities and evenness of metre direct listeners on a course of undiminishing grandeur that leads naturally to calmness in repose.’
    • ‘The strife of the birds and its sharp sounds are an instance of repose to me, a moment whose inclination is towards an ecstasy, sure as sure can be.’
    • ‘The subject is a rendering of a female in repose, wrapped in a blanket of stars and night sky.’
    • ‘But those moments of rest and repose are important to feed the soul.’
    • ‘For those who have consulted dictionaries for the word, its typical appearance between serenade and serene may bring a sense of tranquility and unruffled repose.’
    • ‘When we do see the dead couple, they are in a state of peacefulness and repose.’
    • ‘And in focussing on the heel and away from the forced point, she accented the descent - the moment of repose.’
    • ‘Celtic legends tell of the misty westward isles, the place of repose to which the soul is borne after death.’
    • ‘Classical storytelling and notions of time are mostly eschewed, while actors connect to one another with a generosity that approaches some sort of spiritual repose.’
    • ‘In a sense, it was this next generation that drove neorealism into repose, making it a relic of a particular time and place.’
    • ‘The work captures O'Hara in repose yet with the suggestion that he would be ready at an instant to bounce into action.’
    • ‘Blue turned her head slightly and saw that Ciel's eyes had shut and she was breathing silently, as if in eternal repose.’
    • ‘It is highly evocative, both in violent action and in repose.’
    • ‘Other pieces depict odd moments of repose, for instance two identical boys asleep on a field of camouflage.’
    • ‘Walled off from the two adjacent streets, it is a quiet space of contemplation and repose.’
    • ‘However, to end this review, I think we should move away from the energetic questing Ives and hear a moment of tranquil repose.’
    • ‘The faces of most cast figures are in repose, and when the artist attempts to animate them, they most often end up resembling masks or caricatures.’
    • ‘Its surface of turbulent waves, sprayed with twelve coats of turquoise automobile paint, floats the eye up to artifacts lifted in moments of repose above the sea of intensity.’
    • ‘It is desirable, at certain times of day or night, to look deeply at objects in repose: wheels that have run long dusty distances bearing great loads of vegetable or mineral, coal sacks, barrels, baskets, carpenters' hafts and helves.’
    • ‘Innocence and repose are the oratorio's distinguishing features.’
    rest, relaxation, inactivity, restfulness, stillness, idleness
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The state of being calm and composed.
      ‘he had lost none of his grace or his repose’
      • ‘It is not the social disaster which we hark back to, but the emotive response - the existential repose and quietude with which men confronted their impending doom.’
      • ‘The placid look of his countenance never changed for an instant; his whole frame rested, uncontrolled, in perfect stillness and repose; not a muscle was seen to twitch.’
      • ‘The beginning of the poem images the self's divisions as the body pulls the speaker's ascending thoughts down from a scene of repose, tranquillity and safety.’
      • ‘Certainly Lieberson has written a virtuosic orchestral showpiece with some lovely, moving moments of repose.’
    2. 1.2Art
      Harmonious arrangement of colours and forms, providing a restful visual effect.
      ‘many of the qualities of the great Piero della Francescas—the sense of grand stasis, of timeless repose—seem strongly reincarnated in this work’
      • ‘He has transformed these overlooked discards into miniatures of intimate beauty and repose.’
      • ‘Rendered with harsh black lines in Pierson's characteristic expressionist style, the figure bows its head in abject repose.’
      • ‘But the dreamlike quality conveyed by Metaphysical painters differed from that of the Surrealists because of their concern with pictorial structure and a strongly architectural sense of repose deriving from Italian Renaissance art.’
      • ‘The trees, with their gently curving trunks, offer a sense of repose, while the references to art history establish Otnes's dialogue with the art before his own.’
      • ‘The canvas is at once typical and atypical of the artist's expressionist manner, familiar in its emphatic and swelling interlocking forms, yet unexpectedly still and harmonious in its quality of repose.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Be situated or kept in a particular place.

    ‘the diamond now reposes in the Louvre’
    • ‘Whose money reposes in the Liechtenstein account?’
    • ‘Literally in a backwater not far from The Hague, Delft reposes among the clefts made through the sleepy Dutch fields by the delta of the Rhine.’
    • ‘A tall white bed reposed shyly by the lonely window.’
    • ‘French windows led out into the grassy back yard and a fireplace made of black marble reposed on one side of the room.’
    • ‘However, it reads like nothing so much as a visit to the bits and pieces of interview notes reposing in the author's research archives.’
    • ‘The other hotel we stayed at, the Shangri-La Rasa Ria, reposes among villages some 40 minutes from the airport.’
    • ‘Its baptismal font (in which many of my ancestors' noggins were wetted) now reposes in a side-chapel of the nearby Johanneskirche.’
    lie, be placed, be set, be situated, be positioned, be supported, rest
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Lie down in rest.
      ‘how sweetly he would repose in the four-poster bed’
    2. 1.2literary [with object]Lay something to rest in or on.
      ‘I'll go to him, and repose our distresses on his friendly bosom’
    3. 1.3archaic [with object]Give rest to.
      ‘he halted to repose his way-worn soldiers’
      • ‘Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,’
      • ‘Two hundred and fifty-eight brave sailors and marines and two officers of our Navy, reposing in the fancied security of a friendly harbor, have been hurled to death, grief and want brought to their homes and sorrow to the nation.’
      • ‘Sorrow breaks seasons and reposing hours, makes the night morning, and the noontide night.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French repos (noun), reposer (verb), from late Latin repausare, from re- (expressing intensive force) + pausare to pause.

Pronunciation:

repose

/rɪˈpəʊz/

Main definitions of repose in English

: repose1repose2

repose2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Place something, especially one's confidence or trust, in.

    ‘we have never betrayed the trust that you have reposed in us’
    • ‘I cannot here give references and authorities for my several statements; and I must trust to the reader reposing some confidence in my accuracy’.’
    • ‘first the promoters of Shoppers' Stop and Mr. G.L. Raheja, in particular, for having reposed their total faith in him and his team and allowing them to make mistakes; and,’
    • ‘The quality of the Festivals are benchmarks in global standards and local multinational brands and corporate houses have reposed their faith in them by becoming partners to the growth of the DSF.’
    • ‘We repose our confidence in them because we believe that they will live up to their own promises.’
    • ‘I am very humbled and grateful for the fact that for an eighth time they have reposed their confidence in me, and I will do all I can to repay that as their representative over the next 3 years.’
    • ‘As Butler's fictional author of the Book of the Machines notes, ‘I cannot think it will ever be safe to repose much trust in the moral sense of any machine.’’
    • ‘But, for the denizens of the Temple City, there are still avenues to get quality products at the most competitive price, if only they repose their faith in the products manufactured by Self-Help Groups.’
    • ‘God simply is with those who repose their trust in him.’
    • ‘They can now perform and show their gratitude to the captain and the selectors for reposing the faith in them.’
    • ‘He refused to be dragged into unnecessary political controversy and instead reposed his trust in the discretion of his voters who all are celebrated writers drawn from 22 languages of India.’
    • ‘just how little control you have over how other people will behave when you repose your trust in them!’
    • ‘It may, nevertheless, be advisable to repose a discretionary authority in the President of the United States, to continue the currency of the Spanish dollar at a value corresponding with the quantity of fine silver contained in it…’
    • ‘So you could repose the power in a panel of psychiatrists.’
    • ‘The Constitution also vests various powers in the governor-general directly; although it is settled that most of these are exercisable on ministerial advice, there are a few cases in which a discretion is reposed in him.’
    • ‘Unless the cases be exactly similar, they repose no perfect confidence in applying their past observation to any particular phenomenon.’
    • ‘Imams and muezzins have reposed their faith in the credentials of BJP leaders, who do not have great reputation for keeping promises.’
    • ‘It is also a powerful cautionary tale for all those who blithely repose their faith in State-led legal reform, codification, standardisation and uniformity.’
    • ‘O ye people, repose your faith in God who is not only your God but God of all and sundry.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘put back in the same position’): from re- ‘again’ + the verb pose, suggested by Latin reponere replace, from re- (expressing intensive force) + ponere to place.

Pronunciation:

repose

/rɪˈpəʊz/