Definition of reportorial in English:

reportorial

adjective

North American
  • Of or characteristic of newspaper reporters:

    ‘reportorial ambition and curiosity’
    • ‘The former provides neutral, reportorial information, while the latter cites Stephen's thoughts directly.’
    • ‘Part of this outlook would be the reportorial role that Bayle assumes, of giving unimpeded voice to all views, even those that compete with his own.’
    • ‘It's full of punchy quotes and well-crafted reportorial scene-painting, of which this is an example.’
    • ‘In that early poem, ‘The Egyptian Passage,’ for example-which is reportorial, without losing any compression of the language, and seems to be about all of the world, including the horror, by implication.’
    • ‘The five books under review here are different in kind from most previous nontechnical ceramics books, which have been either hagiographic or reportorial.’
    • ‘But he was always a smart writer with an acute reportorial eye.’
    • ‘The story - and it is a big, dense, messy, colorful, kaleidoscopic, exhilarating, depressing story - is told with political acumen, reportorial vividness and narrative flair.’
    • ‘Though reportorial and detailed, they took a nonjudgmental stance toward their generally nonviolent subjects.’
    • ‘In the reportorial images, evocative views from the ongoing series ‘Chasing Shadows’, Mofokeng reveres the arcane spirit of syncretic Easter Sunday rituals performed at the cave of Motouleng, a Free State mountain regarded as holy.’
    • ‘In the middle of this narrative comes a chapter called ‘The Laws,’ eight pages of laws, starting with the Gold Rush, written in a reportorial style that clashes with the stories' rich lyricism.’
    • ‘Each makes the mistake of missing the narrative forest for the scrupulous reportorial trees.’
    • ‘The first sentence is a standard reportorial sentence from a third-person perspective, whereupon follows a direct quotation of Hordubal's thoughts with no quotational signals.’
    • ‘They work behind the scenes of the world reporter and traveler to address the gap between mythologized author and his reportorial world of others.’
    • ‘His reportorial instincts helped him in his fiction.’
    • ‘Here, then, is the truest piece of the observation that Evans's work is cold - not that it is impersonal, reportorial or without feeling, but that it is so passionately severe with its subjects.’
    • ‘What Joseph Mitchell achieved in his New Yorker profiles of Bowery ticket-takers, Staten Island oystermen and Mohawk skyscraper steelworkers, Kuralt approached, more fondly, in his reportorial visits.’
    • ‘Only in 1843 was Cole able to paint a more reportorial view of the area as it had probably looked some seven years earlier.’
    • ‘Of Barrett and Raymond as ‘historians’ it may be said of their styles that Raymond maintains reportorial restraint where Barrett is at times ‘colorful.’’
    • ‘The space, the volume of the prose-poem means, for him, more narrative, reportorial opportunity-more time, more stretch, more loop, more transition, more cover.’
    • ‘Given his telegenic good looks and celebrity, Junger could easily opt for cushy reportorial assignments.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from reporter, on the pattern of editorial.

Pronunciation:

reportorial

/ˌrɛpɔːˈtɔːrɪəl/