Main definitions of rep in English

: rep1rep2rep3rep4rep5

rep1

noun

informal
  • 1A representative:

    ‘a union rep’
    • ‘Local Orlando travel agents were greeted by the local rep.’
    • ‘Workers say they never see union reps, even when they phone repeatedly.’
    • ‘Please tell him to contact his VA rep for assistance.’
    • ‘There were occasional incursions into how to deal with union reps, managing staff, dealing the public and least of all building maintenance or security.’
    • ‘Even as other students were well into their third week of classes, some SFSS forum reps were still enjoying a holiday from public service.’
    • ‘We got a great producer's rep on board to help us negotiate our way through distribution and he's been doing a stellar job.’
    • ‘Then we called our rep in the tower to tell him our situation.’
    • ‘This consists of student reps, teachers, maintenance staff and a parent representative.’
    • ‘Marketing reps who take this approach sometimes do so because they're sure of the product quality being offered.’
    • ‘And so began my first few weeks as a marketing rep.’
    • ‘Overall, this is a disjointed album that sounds like it was masterminded by MTV marketing reps.’
    • ‘‘The guys have been having interviews all day,’ says Cake's label rep, ushering me toward the band.’
    • ‘The NWPMA is a regional trade association made up of distributors, suppliers and supplier reps in the promotional marketing industry.’
    • ‘And that's more or less what University of Alberta student union reps were confronted with last Friday when they came to work to find a blank wall where a mural used to be.’
    • ‘It shouldn't have come to this but it reflects how we as public reps are being treated by the officials.’
    • ‘These are usually given out by Student Union reps and it will contain a book full of tokens for free food and half price travel, clothes and books etc.’
    • ‘During her time as a pharmaceutical rep she travelled south again to cover the Kerry and Cork regions and retains some colourful memories of that time.’
    • ‘Promotional reps for beer companies and sports gambling schemes love to come to the Bomber to promote their corporate agendas by giving away free stuff.’
    • ‘She's pretty upset and telling her legal reps that five British publications are getting it all wrong.’
    • ‘Booking in advance is helpful, but ARAMARK reps say that lodging almost never sells out, so it's possible to get a room or campsite the same day you arrive, even in the summer.’
    seller, salesperson, salesman, saleswoman, dealer, trader, tradesman, retailer, shopkeeper, shopman, shop girl, shop boy, sales assistant, assistant, wholesaler, merchant, trafficker, purveyor, supplier, stockist, marketer, marketeer, sales representative, door-to-door salesman, travelling salesman, commercial traveller
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A sales representative:
      ‘area sales reps’
      • ‘That hadn't happened when sales reps were assigned target clients alphabetically.’
      • ‘Throughout the process, sales reps take notes about their conversations, looking for anything that can help refine their pitch, or be of use in direct mail campaigns or at trade shows.’
      • ‘There are kiosks to display carrier plans and coverage, and knowledgeable sales reps who will, Rosenthal promises, even help you set up your phone afterward.’
      • ‘As a result, the reps can revise follow-on sales accordingly - before customers are alienated.’
      • ‘He was losing money almost every month because the reps weren't making enough new sales to replace the corporate contracts that had ended.’
      • ‘At the same time, front-end sales reps may have trouble meeting their forecast if their back-end colleagues gin up the wrong products.’
      • ‘This is the basis on which many overseas sales reps are trained: holidaymakers are considered an easy target, simply because they have proven to be so down the years.’
      • ‘She figured out, for example, that she does best with sales reps who take her clothes to the boutiques - rather than expecting the buyers to come to a central show room.’
      • ‘Because the freshest sales statistics are readily available, the company's sales reps are more accountable - and much more likely to compete with one another.’
      • ‘Their sales reps are generally more forthright.’
      • ‘Sales reps wield enormous influence, as doctors depend on them for information on the newest prescription drugs and clinical findings.’
      • ‘This was the pharmaceutical industry, after all, where swarms of sales reps compete for doctors' attention.’
      • ‘About half of Block's 50 or so field sales reps have at least 10 years of service but are not ready to retire, according to a source.’
      • ‘Currently, industry sales reps can give doctors copies of studies on unapproved uses if the reports appear in peer-reviewed medical journals.’
      • ‘The same doctor said that the sales reps who work for the biggest pharmaceutical companies predictably tend to have few compunctions about giving their products the hard sell.’
      • ‘Sales reps get paid the same whether you buy a Kia or a Corvette.’
      • ‘In their first year, two out of three new sales reps leave.’
      • ‘Business contracts can be followed up quickly, and sales reps have instant access to the exact data that they need.’
      • ‘The veteran sales reps were regularly asked to give talks to groups of new management trainees and to speak at conferences of district managers.’
      • ‘The sales reps were an integral part of the campaign's success.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]informal
  • Act as a sales representative:

    ‘at eighteen she was working for her dad, repping on the road’

Origin

Late 19th century: abbreviation.

Pronunciation:

rep

/rɛp/

Main definitions of rep in English

: rep1rep2rep3rep4rep5

rep2

noun

informal
  • 1[mass noun] Repertory:

    ‘once, when I was in rep, I learned Iago in three days’
    • ‘Orlando is in rep at the Royal Opera House, London WC2, October 6-23.’
    • ‘Instead, it was a chance for our actors to expand their knowledge of the Bard, spend a summer in rep, take valuable steps to attain Equity status without hurting fellow actors in the community, and to do the work we all love to do.’
    • ‘The previously seen I Remember Mapa will play in rep with Mapa's latest, Drama!’
    • ‘The story deals with trust and betrayal and the savage rupture of the relationship between two East End chums: a brooding rep actor, Mark, and an angst-ridden City worker, Pete.’
    • ‘Macbeth is in rep at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon, until October 2.’
    • ‘While the neglected plays of lesser dramatists of the period have been celebrated in recent years, the comedies of Sheridan, once the staple of every rep company, have dipped in popularity.’
    • ‘Luisa Miller is in rep at the Royal Opera House, London WC2, from Tuesday until May 17.’
    • ‘The cinemas are showing the latest films, the theatres offer a variety of rep and travelling shows, the nightclubs offer a variety of entertainment and the guidebooks are full of places of heritage and other interest.’
    • ‘And I still remember doing rep in Dundee; and there was a certain actor, he was always a bit late coming on.’
    • ‘Sweeney Todd is in rep at the Royal Opera House, London WC2, from December 15 until January 14.’
    • ‘When I left drama school, there were dozens of rep theatres you could apply to where you got a good training.’
    • ‘The Bloor, Toronto's venerable rep cinema, was packed for opening night film, Lolo's Child, by hometown director Romeo Candido.’
    • ‘At its best this piece is illuminating and humorous: an engaging start to the Peter Hall Company's rep season.’
    • ‘Which is why the Royal Exchange decided to do it in rep with a Chekov.’
    • ‘Opera North's production of Manon is in rep at the Grand Theatre, Leeds, from Thursday until November 15.’
    1. 1.1[count noun] A repertory theatre or company:
      [in names] ‘the Birmingham Rep’
      • ‘A big chance was missed a couple of years back when Peter Hall proved that a classic-and-modern rep, based on inexpensive changeovers, was capable of drawing crowds to the Old Vic.’
      • ‘This tour, with its Royal Ballet dancers and works from the company's rep, will fit nicely into his CV.’
      drama, dramatics, dramatic art, show business, the play, the footlights
      View synonyms

Origin

1920s: abbreviation.

Pronunciation:

rep

/rɛp/

Main definitions of rep in English

: rep1rep2rep3rep4rep5

rep3

(also repp)

noun

  • [mass noun] A fabric with a ribbed surface, used in curtains and upholstery.

    • ‘The new cravat, a satin and twill model from Brooks Brothers, will replace his old one, a classic repp tie, also from Brooks Brothers.’
    • ‘In the meantime he peered into the inside of the carriage, which was upholstered in blue rep, with silk fringes and trimmings.’
    • ‘Instead, go for bold and simple patterns; choose repp stripes, various styles of diagonal stripes, or solid patterns.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from French reps, of unknown ultimate origin.

Pronunciation:

rep

/rɛp/

Main definitions of rep in English

: rep1rep2rep3rep4rep5

rep4

noun

North American
informal
  • ‘I don't know why caffeine's suddenly got such a bad rep’
    short for reputation
    • ‘But carbs are equally important, despite their bad rep.’
    • ‘Chandler has a player rep, but he likes me, and if we break up, I don't care because we would eventually anyway.’
    • ‘Europeans caught on first, then Jones' rep spread through the global club scene, eventually hitting the North American college market.’
    • ‘Lip liner has gotten a bad rep but if you stick to a rosy-brown that matches your lip color, it can actually look great.’
    • ‘Lawyers get a bad rep, but overcoming that reputation could prove to be good for business.’
    • ‘I had a bad rep back home and he wanted me right under his nose where he could see me.’
    • ‘It has a longstanding rep as a place where countercultural creativity and characteristically Texan over-the-topness collide.’
    • ‘Who knows why those Bohemians always get such a bad rep?’
    • ‘It's gotten a bad rep as being the old-lady hobby.’
    • ‘But despite their popularity as a family pet, cats tend to have a bad rep.’
    • ‘And we all know from experience that sorcerers with reps are bad news.’
    • ‘And it seems that this sorcerer has a little bit of a rep.’
    • ‘His bad rep would buy them all the free press they could want, and he had the acting chops to back it up.’
    • ‘Power socials are used to defeat villains (don't ask me why we're defeating villains, but we are…) or to improve your rep.’
    • ‘A gifted natural, Gerry got into the trade shortly afterwards and quickly developed his current rep as one of the top locksmiths in town.’
    • ‘People can get hurt, friends can become enemies and reps can be tarnished by bogus gossip.’
    • ‘The large, two-story Studio A, which has developed a rep as a good drum room, also holds up to 35 musicians, facilitating scoring work.’
    • ‘She is on the ‘steering committee’ for The Festival City Partnership - they're the people who've earned us our rep as a world-class festival city.’
    • ‘Sodium may have a bad rep, but it's essential for regulating body fluids and blood pressure as well as for nerve transmission, muscle function and absorption of important nutrients.’
    • ‘It's a searching song that beats just about any of the acoustic folkies that build their entire rep on self-imposed authentic recording methods.’

Pronunciation:

rep

/rɛp/

Main definitions of rep in English

: rep1rep2rep3rep4rep5

rep5

noun

  • (in bodybuilding) a repetition of a set of exercises:

    ‘complete all reps on one leg and then change over’
    • ‘To complete the first cycle in the circuit, after you have finished your barbell rows, immediately begin your bent knee sit-ups; perform 30 reps.’
    • ‘don't forget to keep contracting your abdominal muscles as you perform each rep; not contracting them is a primary reason you lose your balance.’
    • ‘Take your time; go relatively slowly with each rep.’
    • ‘Continue to alternate for reps (one rep equals a lunge on each leg).’
    • ‘However, the reps go up dramatically for endurance-oriented muscles such as calves and abs.’
    • ‘These aren't isolated exercises; they work several muscle groups at once, so stay focused through every rep.’
    • ‘You perform your reps as you normally would until you can't do any more.’
    • ‘Start with one rep and a support for your feet, and build up to longer sets (try climbing up to hold number 8), more reps, and eventually fewer fingers.’
    • ‘Perform five to six reps to the right, then switch sides to compete the set.’
    • ‘For your first set, then, you would perform 15 reps using 130 pounds.’
    • ‘If I have a spotter, I might even go a little heavier and use the assistance to get an extra rep or two.’
    • ‘This lets you use the maximum number of muscle fibers with every rep.’
    • ‘Again, the rep ranges are designed this way for a reason, so don't ever fall short of eight reps at this stage.’
    • ‘To start, perform 3-5 reps of each move before going on to the next one.’
    • ‘Follow immediately with one more drop set, again 30 percent lighter, performing these reps slowly - three counts up and three counts down.’
    • ‘Hold your upper body straight and your core tight as you perform each rep; avoid the tendency to arch too much or use momentum.’
    • ‘You won't be able to perform as many reps with this technique, but you'll build your triceps much more effectively.’
    • ‘In the gym, using relatively heavy loads and performing as little as one set of only eight reps will generate impressive gains.’
    • ‘The main thing is, you don't ever want to fall short of 10 reps at this stage.’
    • ‘If your breathing and posture are correct, you will be able to perform each rep with control, concentration, precision and flow.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • (in knitting patterns) repeat (stitches or part of a design):

    ‘rep the last row’

Origin

1950s: abbreviation.

Pronunciation:

rep

/rɛp/