Definition of reorder in English:

reorder

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Request (something) to be made, supplied, or served again.

    ‘reps reorder any titles which fall below the agreed number’
    • ‘Some progress in these areas has resulted in improved in-transit visibility with commensurate savings in airlift and air refueling because of a reduced need to reorder parts and other goods.’
    • ‘The exact same size, model and color of shoe is then reordered for that particular retail location, guaranteeing a steady and predictable flow of inventory for the Foot Locker locations.’
    • ‘Astea's product will allow a customer to track spares, and also has a programme which can automatically reorder certain parts, to maintain a minimum level at all times.’
    • ‘After many phone calls, I was asked to reorder the part.’
    • ‘Mistakes would happen, and he might lose time in the field by having to reorder the part.’
    • ‘In addition, all cancelled urine culture samples would be held in Microbiology for 24-hours post cancellation and reordered immediately upon physician request.’
    • ‘These were samples that showed either a positive dipstick or a negative dipstick and were reordered on physician request, or not cancelled.’
    • ‘The agencies need to coordinate personnel, reorder supplies, and report problems and progress back to their home offices.’
    • ‘You must have a system to ensure that components coming in are accounted for properly and that canceled items are reordered or obtained from another source.’
    • ‘For that matter, it won't be long before customers like Young will be able to reorder supplies through their wireless Palms.’
    • ‘Then reorder another cartridge straight away.’
    • ‘Using databases, statistical models, and forecasts, the software told him how many of each spare he had, how many he needed, which ones broke down most frequently, and when to reorder them.’
    • ‘To overcome these distribution inefficiencies, warfighting units frequently found substitute items or reordered the supplies, compounding the congested supply pipeline problem.’
    • ‘Except perhaps for damaged product, these complaints do not involve regulatory issues; however, they may be factors in whether customers will reorder a device.’
    • ‘The store did not come back to us and we told them that if we reordered the vouchers before January we would amend the details.’
    • ‘Imagine how much easier it would be to reorder parts using a system that automatically queries embedded chips every few minutes and accounts for parts as they are used.’
    • ‘Regardless of the results of the urine dipstick, a provider should always be given the option of reordering a culture based on the patient's clinical findings.’
  • 2Arrange (something) again or differently.

    ‘he fixed his bed and reordered his books’
    • ‘So imagine the complexity of reordering an entire system, all at once, with nothing to go on.’
    • ‘I reordered the values so that there was a maximum positive correlation between the two variables.’
    • ‘Then in 1993 a near-fatal accident seemed to reorder Houghton's priorities.’
    • ‘It was the need to escape this trap that in part led Smithson to reorder the relationship between art and audience along the mundane lines of consumer and consumed.’
    • ‘After each pretest, items on the survey were reordered for clarity.’
    • ‘For more judicious control over the order in which the files in a title play, right-click on the title and select Properties, and reorder the tracks using the up and down buttons.’
    • ‘In the vacuum, each side began to suspect the worst and reordered their foreign policies accordingly.’
    • ‘Many of an organisation's greatest risks are unknown; the unexpected sources of danger that materialise suddenly can cause an institution to reorder its priorities for risk management.’
    • ‘Upon entering, he knew that someone had been looking for something; drawers had been opened, the things in cabinets rearranged, stones and crystals on the counters reordered in different piles.’
    • ‘As a type of humor or verbal wit, teasing is a device for establishing and reordering social hierarchies.’
    • ‘It will sharply boost military spending, reorder budgetary priorities, and put constraints on discretionary spending for other programs.’
    • ‘So, however corrupt the parentage of the recall, it offers Californians a golden opportunity to send a historic message: that it's time to reorder our policy priorities and get back to serving the people.’
    • ‘The new scheme reorders the site through a series of strong, simple interventions that civilize the experience of bus travel.’
    • ‘The social and moral landscapes of the world must be reordered in accordance with this ‘new reality’, this revelation, this vision of the cosmos.’
    • ‘It reordered the entire planet in so many different ways.’
    • ‘Jesus reorders power structures among those who wish to follow him.’
    • ‘The dangerous stretch of forest was already well within bowshot or he would have opted for stopping where they were to reorder their own ranks and let the enemy - assuming there was an enemy - come to them.’
    • ‘Said ‘reporter’ then scans the other 53 billion other articles that all say the same thing and then reorders the words and submits it for publication.’
    • ‘As before, each list was presented in a series of learning and recall trials, with the list reordered in a different random sequence between each presentation.’
    • ‘Its aim is to break the logjam that has frustrated Middle East peace for fifty-odd years and then to reorder the map of an entire area to serve the strategic interests of the United States.’
    diversify, variegate, bring variety to, assort, mix, enlarge, expand, widen, broaden, increase, proliferate, extend
    View synonyms

noun

  • A renewed or repeated order for goods.

    • ‘‘We make better use of our archives, and we're better and faster at reorders now that we can find the swatches quickly and painlessly,’ he says.’
    • ‘Most of the work done there is for small collections, first-of-series orders, recuts and reorders.’
    • ‘If you want to do a reorder, you have to go to them or pay another tape charge with someone else.’
    • ‘We do not have the orders down, but we do have the reorders.… We're taking it step by step.’
    • ‘These best sellers turn over fast, so anticipate sales and plan your reorders.’
    • ‘To prevent reorders and delays, Sterling needed to be able to write accurate estimates.’
    • ‘‘We can correct problems quickly and can respond to reorders,’ Lorber says.’
    • ‘You'll be able to buy smaller quantities than you would have to purchase if you were manufacturing abroad, and you won't have to wait as long for reorders.’
    • ‘Once a device is on the market, customer satisfaction can be measured using surveys, field reports, complaints, and reorders.’
    • ‘A recent development was the decision by Marvel in 2001 to discontinue the practice of reorders for any issue that may sell better than expected, forcing retailers to take even greater risks when ordering.’
    • ‘There was a disconnect between consumer takeaway and supply chain reorders.’
    • ‘Another example in the supply system: We are getting to the point where a certain number of items in stock will trigger a reorder.’
    • ‘Well, that is going to give a little boost, all their reorders.’

Pronunciation:

reorder

/riːˈɔːdə/