Definition of removal van in English:

removal van

noun

British
  • A large van used to transport furniture and other household goods from one house to another.

    • ‘Stories of removal vans breaking down, mortgage money failing to materialise or a buyer or seller pulling out at the last moment are legion.’
    • ‘Make sure there will be enough space for removal vans at both addresses.’
    • ‘A removal van was sitting on the far side of the road.’
    • ‘Earlier this month I find the museum abuzz with activity and the crashing sound of metal trolleys being loaded onto removal vans.’
    • ‘Salaried Compensation is paid for help with legal fees, stamp duty, estate agents and the cost of hiring a removal van.’
    • ‘She listened to the removal van start up and accelerate away, and two words looped in her mind like a stuck record.’
    • ‘I noted the geographical origin of their removal vans.’
    • ‘They rarely activated themselves but had been known to go off when dropped, when shut in cupboards or, on one memorable occasion, while being carried in a removal van.’
    • ‘Though it is not sinking, removal vans gather at the Clarendon Building’
    • ‘Now I groan a bit at the prospect of moving and wonder if all our stuff will fit in one removal van.’
    • ‘I was stuck behind a removal van for far too long the other day, adding literally seconds to my journey.’
    • ‘Everything went in the removal van in one go and got unpacked in half the time it took us to pack!’
    • ‘The day removal vans arrived at her Kent home, signalling what should have been a long-awaited future of peace and contentment, Anita put an application form in the post.’
    • ‘It was too big to fit in the removal van without taking it apart, and we hastliy unassembled it on the day of the move.’
    • ‘The Housing Executive lacked sufficient storage space or removal vans.’
    • ‘Over the road, a removal van has pulled up.’
    • ‘Moving house usually entails careful planning and a removal van but for two rhinos it was a six-year process involving over 60 people, at a cost of about 1.2 million.’
    • ‘At least they will be spared the callously quick handover of British prime ministers, with the humiliating exchange of removal vans on the day after the election.’
    • ‘A removal van stopped just behind it to protect the car, and the van driver, from Cheshire, got out to help.’
    • ‘Every night somewhere in Belfast we see sectarian attacks and every morning the removal vans arrive to take another family away to another location.’