Definition of remission in English:



  • 1The cancellation of a debt, charge, or penalty.

    ‘the scheme allows for the partial remission of tuition fees’
    • ‘It would be monstrous if, having paid such a bill by direct payment instead of by the remission of funds to the bank (the acceptor), the customer could bring an action to enforce the bills against the bank.’
    • ‘In October 1956 he announced a plan for national development that had at its core a special incentive to encourage exports by a 50 per cent remission of tax on profits derived from increased exports.’
    • ‘Successful candidates receive free tuition in two instruments in addition to a 50% fee remission.’
    • ‘Both current and new students will benefit from the program, but if students switch programmes or fail to graduate, their loans will not be eligible for remission.’
    • ‘Taxpayers, to the tune of £1.15 bn per annum, will fund the additional support for students, which include fee remission and larger loan values.’
    • ‘One way to balance this is to consider joining a faculty that has dependent tuition remission.’
    • ‘The emperor Julian, we are told, refused the traditional remission of tax arrears on the express ground that ‘this profited only the wealthy’, while the poor had to pay on the dot.’
    • ‘This is evident when they propose to narrowly restrict eligibility for Third World debt remission so as not to offend the bankers of the West.’
    • ‘Where graduate students do not receive benefits and/or tuition remission, these goals should also be pursued.’
    • ‘Students with family incomes of less than £31, 230 are eligible to receive partial fee remission from the government on a sliding scale.’
    • ‘The total, shared cost after tax remission was 317,107 [pounds sterling].’
    • ‘The party has also stressed the need for preparing a strong case for the remission of interest on agricultural loans.’
    cancellation, setting aside, suspension, revocation, repeal, rescinding, abrogation
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    1. 1.1British The reduction of a prison sentence, especially as a reward for good behaviour.
      ‘for every two days they work the prisoners earn one day's remission of their sentence’
      • ‘The offenders' liberty, in the absence of sentence remission, would actually be restricted for a longer period than if incarcerated.’
      • ‘There are free pardons, there are conditional pardons, there is the remission of sentence, there are a range of options.’
      • ‘For one thing remission for good behaviour was one third of the sentence.’
      • ‘In Greenfield the Court of Appeal held that a decision that a prisoner should lose remission because he failed a mandatory drugs test was not a decision upon a criminal charge.’
      • ‘It is an administrative act that returns him to prison and the impact of it is that unless he is re-released to parole, at this point he will do the full seven years without remission.’
      • ‘And it came as a pleasant surprise for all the 59 prisoners, 29 of them lifers, who were released from the Central Jail on Sunday after remission of their remaining term.’
      • ‘If I was in Indian jails I would have by this time earned much remission, could have sent more letters home, got visits.’
      • ‘In a case the state had granted remission on the ground that the accused was implicated in a false case even when his sentence was upheld by the Supreme Court.’
      • ‘In this she looked at letters of remission in which people in sixteenth-century France begged to be pardoned after having been found guilty of capital crimes.’
      • ‘He said Mackay could end up serving 21 months with remission for good behaviour.’
      • ‘There are much tighter restrictions on the administrative capacity of prison authorities to grant either some remission of the length of a sentence or to provide release.’
      • ‘Their penalties included forfeiture of the potential remission of sentence otherwise available to them.’
      • ‘Inadequacy of reasons should not lead to remission if the court may confidently reach its own decision on the merits.’
      • ‘It was also noted that none of the prisoners had any private law right which he could have pursued, since remission of sentence was not a right but an indulgence.’
      • ‘Stiffer sentences should be handed down and a mechanism should be introduced where remission of a percentage of the prison sentence could be attached to the recovery of funds.’
      • ‘The Crown argued that the phrase ‘I have done the lot’ was slang for the removal of all remission of sentence resulting in a requirement to serve a full custodial term.’
      • ‘Judicial sources indicated that he would be returned to Ireland within two and a half years since a third of all sentences are subject to remission and time already in custody is taken into account.’
      • ‘By volunteering to go, prisoners would win a remission of sentence and efface the stigma of jail.’
      • ‘He has apparently been offered remission of his present sentence and immunity from further prosecution if he testifies.’
      reduction in sentence, reduced sentence
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    2. 1.2formal Forgiveness of sins.
      • ‘But the believing church, from the beginning and through now and through the ages, believes that Jesus Christ is the very son of God, that He's a savior whom God sent to shed His blood for the remission of our sins.’
      • ‘The individual benefits by remission of sins and spiritual training, but a prime purpose is to strengthen the solidarity of the Muslim community.’
      • ‘No one is sure that his own contrition is sincere; much less that he has attained full remission.’
      • ‘If his right to grant remission in such cases were despised, the guilt would remain entirely unforgiven.’
      • ‘An indulgence was a papal document that granted the buyer remission from the need to do penance for his sins.’
      • ‘The armed pilgrimage had not lost its allure, nor the promise of remission of sins.’
      • ‘Perhaps as a moralizing subtext, Alexander piped in a recording of a monastic chant of Psalm 51, a prayer for the remission of sins.’
      • ‘Third, we pray to obtain from him the forgiveness of our sins and the remission of their punishment.’
      • ‘Without the shedding of the blood of Jesus there could have been no remission of sin.’
      • ‘She also included characters to lecture on the Presbyterian and Methodist arguments for the practice as well as a ‘Campbellite’ to testify to baptism for the remission of sins.’
      • ‘We remember that John the Baptist preached a baptism of repentance for the remission of sin.’
      • ‘Infants, because they lacked a will developed enough to choose evil, need not be baptized for the remission of sins they had never committed.’
      • ‘There will be absolution and remission of sins for all who die in the service of Christ.’
      forgiveness, pardoning, absolution, exoneration, exculpation
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  • 2A temporary diminution of the severity of disease or pain.

    ‘ten patients remained in remission’
    • ‘However, the patient experienced a partial remission, whereas previous chemotherapy treatments alone had had no effect.’
    • ‘At this dosage, 80 percent of patients will experience clinical remission or improvement within four weeks.’
    • ‘In both studies, bright light was superior to the placebo condition in producing clinical remissions.’
    • ‘Treatment for ulcerative colitis seeks to improve quality of life by inducing and maintaining remission of symptoms and inflammation.’
    • ‘Spontaneous remissions often occur within twelve months, but many patients continue to have symptoms for years.’
    • ‘Two of the five patients sustained complete remission of symptoms for more than a year prior to the study.’
    • ‘She had been in remission for five years and it was coming back.’
    • ‘She has now been in remission for 16 months.’
    • ‘The patient had not yet achieved complete remission at the time of this report.’
    • ‘The patient was considered to have a partial remission and was monitored.’
    • ‘Clinicians and their patients need evidence based treatment strategies that produce complete sustained remissions and improve quality of life.’
    • ‘Spontaneous remission occurs in approximately two thirds of these patients.’
    • ‘The disease was in remission for eighteen months but reappeared in January.’
    • ‘His achievement is more remarkable as he is in remission from chronic myeloid leukaemia.’
    • ‘For most patients partial remission of symptoms is the best that they can hope for.’
    • ‘She'd been in remission for three months now and so far things were looking good.’
    • ‘The medical complications of bulimia, however, are considerable and can persist long after clinical remission is achieved.’
    • ‘No single therapy has been proven effective at achieving complete remission in every patient.’
    • ‘The authors conclude that methotrexate is safe and effective for maintaining remission in patients with Crohn's disease.’
    • ‘Pituitary irradiation can induce remission of disease in more than one half of patients with recurrence after surgery.’
    respite, abeyance
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Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin remissio(n-), from remittere send back, restore (see remit).