Definition of remake in English:

remake

verb

[with object]
Pronunciation /riːˈmeɪk/
  • Make (something) again or differently.

    ‘the bed would be more comfortable if it were remade’
    • ‘Remaking movies is always a risky endeavor, and remaking a classic can border on the foolhardy.’
    • ‘The fact that he is working again is already a blessing, and the fact that he is remaking a masterpiece doesn't in this case mean any reversion to formula.’
    • ‘This ruins the heads after 3 or 4 scenes, so you have to be good at remaking a model in exactly the same way.’
    • ‘This utter neglect of a celebrated director is the real cause for anger, not the fact that his most popular work was remade.’
    • ‘There's just something about it that doesn't translate that well… Or maybe it is just the utterly pointless concept of remaking it identically here.’
    • ‘While the remake of Japanese horror might be novel, remaking a film has become standard Hollywood practice.’
    • ‘Try as we can, we just can't see the point of movies being remade into musicals.’
    • ‘Nowadays, if scanning the movie listings gives us any indication, most of the foreign films being remade are cult Japanese horror flicks.’
    • ‘I got the impression he didn't think much of the idea of remaking it, although he was trying to be polite about the whole thing.’
    • ‘Community is not a fixed social unit, but a network of social interactions that are continually remade.’
    • ‘They don't think Americans will get our series, so they're remaking it.’
    • ‘Have any of our readers had much luck taking apart a ready-to-wear garment and remaking it?’
    • ‘The actor is remaking the classic ‘War of the Worlds,’ based on the H.G. Wells novel.’
    • ‘I had a lot of difficulties when I had to do songs for films being remade in Hindi.’
    • ‘I ask whether he feels under pressure remaking a solid gold classic.’
    • ‘Relationships are not given in kinship but rather need to be made and continually remade.’
    • ‘He looked at the damage and knew it was very unlikely he could fix it without almost entirely remaking the robot.’
    • ‘Why did you decide to hand this over to another director instead of remaking it yourself?’
    • ‘From building desks, repairing or remaking doors or operating heavy equipment, Hall said no task was too great.’
    • ‘Is remaking a competitor's commercial with a very different meaning a protected parody?’
    improve, make better, better, ameliorate, refine, mend, rectify, correct, rehabilitate
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noun

Pronunciation /ˈriːmeɪk/
  • A film or piece of music that has been filmed or recorded again.

    ‘a remake of the classic horror tale, ‘Frankenstein’’
    • ‘Some films are book adaptations, some are remakes of existing films, some are even created whole cloth from original ideas.’
    • ‘One of the reasons is that at this time of so many banal remakes and artificial movies made from TV shows, reviewers are thankful for an uncompromising effort.’
    • ‘It's not a remake of the film, though, but a proper sequel that picks up where the story left off.’
    • ‘This remake of the 1968 film, Planet of the Apes, has been on the drawing board for a long time.’
    • ‘Despite this, Hollywood continues to supply the public with remakes of films that were perfectly fine in the first place.’
    • ‘Do you have any problem with Hollywood's recent trend of doing big-budget remakes for classic low-budget horror films?’
    • ‘Cape Fear proved to be quite a successful film, as remakes go.’
    • ‘They may both be remakes of better films, but there is no denying that the American versions of these Japanese classics now command a very strong position in the marketplace.’
    • ‘But with the frenzy of sequels, prequels, remakes and biopics being shovelled out by Hollywood, it comes as no surprise that relying on an existing popular story is the path of least resistance.’
    • ‘The one thing I have a little bit of a problem with is I don't quite understand this obsession about doing remakes and making television series into feature films.’
    • ‘Being a remake, the film really needs to keep the basic plot intact.’
    • ‘The film is a remake of a 1977 film which saw George Segal and Jane Fonda playing a married couple who turn to crime to pay the bills.’
    • ‘One of the keys to the success of the 2001 remake was the film score.’
    • ‘Making a remake of my original movie was a big challenge and also fun, that's why I took the offer to direct.’
    • ‘The current remake of the film updates those fears for the post-Cold War era and a new set of concerns.’
    • ‘While created under the best of intentions, remakes of classic films will always fall under severe scrutiny.’
    • ‘Does that mean that you are really intending to do a remake of the film that was done 15 years ago with Jack Nicholson?’
    • ‘Which brings us to Dawn of the Dead, a loose remake of the second movie in Romero's notorious trilogy.’
    • ‘Creativity is basically gone from Hollywood and many of the movies coming out today are remakes of successful earlier films.’
    • ‘As you may know, this film is a remake of the 1931 Oscar winning movie of the same name.’
    improvement, betterment, amelioration, refinement, rectification, correction, rehabilitation
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

remake

Verb/riːˈmeɪk/

remake

Noun/ˈriːmeɪk/