Definition of relet in English:

relet

verb

[WITH OBJECT]British
  • Let (a property) for a further period or to a new tenant.

    • ‘In some cases repairs have to be carried out before the house can be relet.’
    • ‘The calculation began by taking the gross development value assessed by applying a 9% yield to the full rental value and then deducting therefrom estimated acquisition costs and reletting costs.’
    • ‘On 4th November the plaintiff's solicitors informed Brent that an application would be made that afternoon to restrain the proposed reletting of the property.’
    • ‘Last year it was revealed that Doncaster had the third-worst rating in the country for reletting its council houses.’
    • ‘At the end of the term, there is good potential for reletting as offices as the location is excellent.’
    • ‘We don't believe it will be too much of a problem to relet it.’
    • ‘If the contractor is performing well, the agency can use its manpower more efficiently on other acquisitions rather than relet the contracts because the minimum time is up.’
    • ‘These flats had then been modernised and relet.’
    • ‘I see no difficulty in the landlord recovering damages at the market rate even though he has adduced no evidence that he would or could have relet the property.’
    • ‘This figure is likely to be achieved if the landlord takes the unit back and then decides to relet it.’
    • ‘The franchises are being relet on a much tighter customer focus and for a much shorter time than before.’
    • ‘The landlords despaired of this campaign because it foiled their plans to relet the evicted holding to a solvent tenant or stock the farm with their own cattle.’
    • ‘The letting agents contacted me a little while ago to see if I wanted to relet the place for another year.’
    • ‘It is a frustrating, expensive, and protracted bureaucratic procedure for the innocent landlord to enter an abandoned property and relet it without going through the tribunal.’
    • ‘A Bradford Council housing spokesman said: ‘There are a number of empty properties on the estate which are in the course of being improved for reletting.’’

noun

British
  • An act of letting a property again.

    • ‘Execute a Relet Agreement that spells out the terms and conditions of a relet.’
    • ‘The overall objectives of the relet were to simplify the current complexity, secure the best possible value for money and put in place the highest standards of service delivery.’

Pronunciation:

relet

/ˈriːlɛt/