Definition of relegation in English:

relegation

noun

mass noun
  • 1The action of assigning to an inferior rank or position.

    ‘the relegation of experienced party members to the status of second-class citizens’
    • ‘We are at no analytical loss with the upcoming relegation of the report to the government data scrapheap.’
    • ‘He was a just, if not a strong, governor, but he regarded his appointment with horror as a second relegation from Rome.’
    • ‘In all the pictures, the elimination of human beings - or their relegation to the middle or far distance - stresses the isolation of the implied observer.’
    • ‘The bag's final relegation to an attic concludes the tale.’
    • ‘The Conservatives' relegation of women to the sidelines reflects where they viewed women in the ideal society.’
    • ‘Historically, the formation of the state depended on a sexual division of labor and the relegation of women to a private, domestic, devalued sphere.’
    • ‘It was precisely his impersonality or lack of message that warranted his relegation to the status of second-rate playwright.’
    • ‘For an architexture book to avoid relegation to the coffee table it must have a further meaning.’
    • ‘One is not wholly within one's skin; to exist and to be recognized as existing, one must resist relegation to marginality.’
    • ‘He fears that abolition of the Research Assessment Exercise would lead to less research and the relegation of some institutions to the status of FE colleges.’
    1. 1.1British The transfer of a sports team or player to a lower division of a league.
      ‘the team manager refuses to throw in the towel and admit that relegation is inevitable’
      count noun ‘the club has suffered two successive relegations’
      • ‘After relegation the team are in a league they are more than capable of winning.’
      • ‘It was clear that the team faced relegation from the Premier League at the end of the season.’
      • ‘In the 1855 league, there was no provision for promotion or relegation.’
      • ‘Pakistan had struggled to avoid relegation from Group One to Group Two.’
      • ‘With just one point separating the bottom four, the relegation battle is far from over.’
      • ‘The loss has terminally damaged their title bid and the manager's primary concern must now be to avoid relegation.’
      • ‘There is no exciting relegation dogfight for those at the bottom end of the scale.’
      • ‘The club was so fraught with internal dissensions that it barely escaped relegation in the National Football League.’
      • ‘In 1985, it was tiered into three divisions with promotion and relegation between divisions generally being based on final league positions.’
      • ‘Following losses at the weekend both teams will be preparing for relegation.’

Pronunciation

relegation

/rɛlɪˈɡeɪʃ(ə)n/