Definition of relativity in English:

relativity

noun

  • 1The absence of standards of absolute and universal application:

    ‘moral relativity’
    • ‘Mr Cowen said the benchmarking system has rid the public sector of relativity clauses that had serious flaws allowing groups with no connections to argue for similar wage deals.’
    • ‘This relativity does affect our attitudes towards age and life.’
    • ‘The late Herbert Stein essayed on the relativity of wealth in 1996 for the Journal editorial page in an article titled ‘Am I Better Off?’’
    • ‘But in an age of DVDs, where the film-makers come back to talk about how they did it, so the relativity of decision-making is growing all the while.’
    • ‘Having to resort to a cruel and unusual punishment adds a moral relativity that is profoundly provocative.’
    • ‘Ferran also raises issues about authenticity, authorship and confidentiality; Chien Chi about cultural relativity.’
    • ‘A response based on contemporary legal norms is unavoidable though the debate on cultural relativity and universality continues.’
    • ‘This is a nostalgia for a different system of values, and its difference from Western moral attitudes serves to highlight the relativity of value systems in East and West, and Ralph's dilemma in striving to live by a hybrid of the two.’
    • ‘Obviously, in the wake of postmodernism we are looking to build up new foundations for ourselves within the context of our newly-acquired radical consciousness of relativity.’
    • ‘I definitely believe in a weak version of linguistic relativity.’
    • ‘The apparent relativity of the moral impulse is an illusion which is created by the mind for the mind's own purposes.’
    • ‘These people constantly lecture the rest of us on being responsible for our actions, asserting that there's no relativity when it comes to good and evil.’
    • ‘On the other hand, moral relativism asserts the relativity of morality.’
    • ‘While we recognize the relativity of any system of beliefs, we do not want to give up on them all, lest we give up on the hope of changing the world.’
    • ‘The world is relativity and relativity has limitations.’
    • ‘Heaped upon itself it becomes dangerously unstable, at some point reversing a fundamental theory of political relativity and becoming the one thing it should never be - the story itself.’
    • ‘Anthropologists have begun to question their previous views on the cultural relativity of emotional experience.’
    • ‘Welker claims his real concern is moral relativity.’
    • ‘Thus, forms of moral relativism assert the relativity of moral values; forms of epistemological relativism assert the relativity of knowledge.’
  • 2Physics
    The dependence of various physical phenomena on relative motion of the observer and the observed objects, especially regarding the nature and behaviour of light, space, time, and gravity.

    • ‘According to general relativity, gravitational differences affect time by dilating it.’
    • ‘General relativity explains the behaviour of gravity and its effect on both matter and energy.’
    • ‘Penrose introduced the scope of modern physics and followed with a description of possible models of the universe based on criteria from the theory of relativity, including the effect of singularities.’
    • ‘Because there are things in the universe that exist or did exist that are very heavy, thus general relativity applies, but these things are also very compact and small, so quantum mechanics applies.’
    • ‘In 1922, the Russian physicist Alexander Friedmann predicted from general relativity that the universe should be expanding.’

Pronunciation:

relativity

/rɛləˈtɪvɪti/