Definition of relabel in English:

relabel

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Label (something) again or differently.

    ‘the library will close to relabel all material with a bar code’
    • ‘Anyway, a manager in the purchasing department wrote a letter to vendors asking them to relabel their equipment.’
    • ‘Bottles with paper labels printed with pre-1860 vintages are probably relabelled or were intended for non-British markets.’
    • ‘Two days later, Army teams made it to the same location, whereupon they crated the Navy boxes in larger crates and relabeled them ‘US Army.’’
    • ‘Company policy and administration was relabeled organization.’
    • ‘The apparent dispersal is necessary to his project of providing a social history of the everyday, or as he interestingly relabels it ‘the ordinary’.’
    • ‘We are relabeling it to some extent, but we are also restructuring our focus and our programs to some extent.’
    • ‘However, it is actually an ‘auriferous pyrite,’ a bona fide gold ore, but not gold per se, so it was relabeled, moved to the pyrite drawers, and not considered further.’
    • ‘Then we reinvented them and called them city technology colleges then relabelled the bottle and called them city academies.’
    • ‘Even the institutional tutelage and apprenticeship arrangements that were the norm decades ago are now relabeled partnerships.’
    • ‘Humor relabels a situation and may allow us to gain power over a system in which we have previously been caught.’
    • ‘The discussion can result in labeling or relabeling a specimen after it has arrived in the laboratory.’
    • ‘Because most physicians work independently, we modified the good supervision scale and relabelled it as the supportive-receptive climate scale.’
    • ‘Traders can reprice goods, but care must be taken when relabelling the goods, as the original lower price must be covered up by the new higher price, to avoid misleading customers.’
    • ‘There seems to be a notion that you should have relabelled it.’
    • ‘True, the Tories were persuaded by liberal Home Office officials in the early 1990s to make more use of community programmes by relabelling them ‘tough’.’
    • ‘My director and engineering department personnel are aware of this and said it would present no harm if the hoses were relabeled for the alternate gas.’
    • ‘In general, we can cut down the number of states by always ordering the piles by height (tallest first), followed by count (smallest first), and then relabeling the colors when necessary.’
    • ‘At the worst extreme, existing courses in standard topics are just relabeled with a hipper, architecture-oriented name.’
    • ‘The products were likely relabeled as Korean after being loaded onto ships at Busan, they said.’
    • ‘This suggests that marketers need to relabel various products to make them seem more utilitarian.’

Pronunciation

relabel

/riːˈleɪb(ə)l/