Definition of rehire in English:

rehire

verb

[with object]
  • Hire (a former employee) again.

    ‘the company dismissed its workers and rehired them on a lower rate’
    • ‘Only rehire those with satisfactory performance.’
    • ‘Judges in nearly all fifty states have ruled in favor of employees claiming ‘unjust’ dismissal, forcing companies to rehire the employee or pay damages.’
    • ‘The workers were usually rehired for the same jobs when business turned up again.’
    • ‘Workers are furious because the company revealed that any growth in orders will be fulfilled by temporary staff, rather than rehired permanent workers.’
    • ‘Parry was one of three executives to be rehired.’
    • ‘As a result, worker activists were rehired and an independent monitoring organization was created.’
    • ‘I think he needs to communicate that to the American people, and promise that he is staying on this case and is not being distracted, because ultimately, that's what they've rehired him to do.’
    • ‘Really what you're talking about now is not only a larger likelihood of job displacement, but a considerably larger likelihood of being rehired at a lower rate of pay.’
    • ‘These profits are going to necessary public services such as rehiring doctors in local hospitals.’
    • ‘It has, however, since rehired two of those employees and placed two more on full-time contracts, giving a net loss of four positions.’
    • ‘They've made a decision that he hasn't done a good enough job to be rehired as president.’
    • ‘Union organizers say some of their outspoken supporters have been abruptly laid off and fear they will not be rehired when conditions stabilize.’
    • ‘He told Oakley he wouldn't work with anyone else, so the company rehired her and let her work from home, with the sole responsibility of tending to Lance.’
    • ‘He has been hired as a consultant and has yet to submit a bill since he has been rehired.’
    • ‘The new area of uncertainty for Americans is in health care because unemployment means not just losing a job but also being without health benefits and potentially being rehired with worse, or no, health insurance.’
    • ‘Today, those who lose their jobs are less likely to be rehired by the same company six months later.’
    • ‘The additional cost to employers was partially offset by the government subsidies for rehiring workers and by increases in productivity.’
    • ‘Some high-tech companies rehired workers to complete projects put on hold last year.’
    • ‘They will now hold discussions with the union over rehiring other laid-off workers.’
    • ‘They fluffed the chance to get a whole new board of their choosing by falling for the old two card trick and effectively rehiring the old guard.’

Pronunciation

rehire