Definition of regroup in English:

regroup

verb

  • Reassemble or cause to reassemble into organized groups, typically after being attacked or defeated.

    no object ‘by November 1971 the opposition was regrouping’
    with object ‘he regrouped his fighters in the hills’
    • ‘In the winter of 1778, Washington's ragged army had retreated here to regroup.’
    • ‘But it is a small force, and they will need to recruit and regroup.’
    • ‘Maroon surged into the area they had left, picking off any who were just partially ‘dead’ and regrouping into one main force again.’
    • ‘There's no place to back out and make contact at another location or regroup your troops.’
    • ‘All remnants of 1832nd and 98th Battalion fall back and regroup!’
    • ‘His mission in the counter-offensive was to regroup his armies and seize Rostov-on-Don.’
    • ‘‘All forces regroup in designated sectors and await pick-up and orders,’ the battalion commander ordered.’
    • ‘It is not known whether they retain a low profile because the state has taken over most of the field or for tactical reasons, while proceeding to regroup and reorganize themselves.’
    • ‘In his hypothetical reverie, he saw that a defeated army could regroup in a matter of weeks and be ready to fight.’
    • ‘On 5 August 1940 an Anglo-Polish Military Agreement was signed which regulated the conditions for Polish forces regrouping in the UK.’
    • ‘Once at Corunna, the British troops regrouped and turned the tables on Napoleon.’
    • ‘It then dawned on me it was my job to regroup the troops.’
    • ‘He left in a fast gallop toward the field to regroup his troops and leave the place.’
    • ‘Between the slow moving drift of enormous floating meteors, the group of frigates drift through in order to regroup their attack.’
    • ‘Some state militaries will deploy massive numbers of child soldiers as a stopgap measure to delay defeat, creating valuable breathing space for their regular army to regroup and rebuild.’
    • ‘Unable to hold the city, he managed the evacuation adroitly, regrouping his forces at White Plains.’
    • ‘In the following weeks the Italian army regrouped and counterattacked.’
    • ‘Once you land make every effort to regroup with as many of our forces as you can.’
    • ‘If the night attack develops the daytime success there should be no gap between the day and night actions so that the enemy could not gain time to move in reserves and fighting equipment or regroup its forces.’
    • ‘Pershing now had forty-two US divisions at his disposal, each twice the size of its European counterpart, and was able to regroup them in a single army - later divided into two - on the right of the Allied line.’
    • ‘The retreating forces regrouped and met up with their main force at the bottom of the hill.’
    • ‘The German Air Force was regrouped during June and early July, to open the first stage of the invasion of Britain by destroying the Royal Air Force.’
    • ‘While the Indian troops are regrouping in Naples, Foot is met on the fields by a Roman counterattack.’
    • ‘The enemies flailed and struggled to regroup before a second attack could be mounted, but they were not successful.’
    • ‘The military were inclined to see evacuation as a capitulation rather than as an orderly way of regrouping the civilian population.’
    • ‘Cameron's E-mail said that Templar forces were regrouping in the mountains.’
    • ‘It was necessary for all parties, both military and civilian, to lay down arms and regroup.’
    • ‘The War Hawks retreated and regrouped, and the Militia tended its wounds.’
    • ‘This is important because as long as your hero, leader, or at least one of the company troops stays alive, they can regroup near a town, or fort and be re-supplied.’
    • ‘‘Most of the outer forces have regrouped at the War Galaxy,’ he began.’
    dramatic change, radical change, drastic alteration, radical alteration, complete shift, sea change, metamorphosis, transformation, conversion, innovation, breakaway
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

regroup

/riːˈɡruːp/