Definition of regift in English:

regift

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
Pronunciation: /riːˈɡɪft/
  • Give (an unwanted gift that one has received) to someone else as a gift:

    ‘do you think she'll regift that horrendous vase?’
    [no object] ‘the survey showed that 5 per cent of consumers plan to regift this Christmas’
    • ‘I personally choose not to regift.’
    • ‘Re-gift things that have been given to you but never used.’
    • ‘You may already have the perfect gift sitting right at home, but there are dos and don'ts to regifting.’
    • ‘That's the ugliest sweater I've ever seen. You should give it to charity or regift it to your mother-in-law.’
    • ‘According to a nationwide consumer-spending survey by American Express, 58 % of people believe it is OK sometimes to regift an item.’
    • ‘Now, someone has come up with a system to make the regifting process completely virtual.’
    • ‘She put our relationship on hold just days after I had bought her an Easter chocolate champagne bottle, which I couldn't regift to anyone else because the lady at Thornton's embossed her name on it.’
    • ‘The Starbucks cards I get from my students I regift to friends who like coffee.’
    • ‘Chances are, it's going to be either: a) returned/exchanged; b) ‘regifted’; or c) thrown in the trash.’
    • ‘I was confused at first, but not after consulting my friend Alex, who regifted a bottle of Manischewitz to his parents; they haven't stop thanking him since.’
    • ‘Gyft, which launched in September, announced a new service last week that allows consumers to regift unused gift cards without detection.’
    • ‘If your items are in good condition, regift them to someone for Christmas or a birthday!’
    • ‘It's great that you are re-gifting your children's overflow birthday items to a worthy cause.’
    • ‘Only regift items to people in different circles.’
    • ‘Don't regift an item to someone even though you know they won't like it.’
    • ‘I know I had quite a few duplicates and outfits my children never wore as babies, and this is a great opportunity to re-gift those items.’
    • ‘Unwanted gifts can be returned and, yes, even regifted, but doing so takes a certain measure of craftiness.’

noun

Pronunciation: /ˈriːɡɪft/
  • An unwanted gift used by its original recipient as a gift for someone else:

    ‘most of my regifts are more meaningful than the usual bouquet of flowers’
    • ‘A gift from your cousin can be a re-gift for a co-worker, for instance, but not your sister.’
    • ‘If something is in good condition, but won't make a good re-gift, you can donate it to charity.’
    • ‘I remember one regift I received that I didn't appreciate.’
    • ‘Some of you may have the perfect re-gift sitting in your driveway or gathering dust in a garage.’
    • ‘The last thing you'd want to have happen is for a regift to get spotted by the person who gave it to you.’
    • ‘Unless it's a family heirloom, most people feel belittled by a regift.’

Pronunciation:

regift

Verb/riːˈɡɪft/

regift

Noun/ˈriːɡɪft/