Definition of refute in English:

refute

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Prove (a statement or theory) to be wrong or false; disprove.

    ‘these claims have not been convincingly refuted’
    • ‘This process of using observation and experiment to refute false theories does not rely on induction in any way.’
    • ‘He thus single-handedly refutes the Platonic theory of evil as ignorance of the good.’
    • ‘It is the nullification of public discourse, for how can one refute accusations grounded in ethnicity?’
    • ‘That story alone would appear to refute the accusations of those who have denounced Sonia as a gold-digger, capitalising on the vulnerability of Orwell when he was dying.’
    • ‘Some Austrian economists have tried to refute this argument by denying the very existence of an income effect.’
    • ‘Such restraint certainly appears to refute any accusation of aerial terrorism and seems almost magnanimous compared to the British propensity to bomb any suspicious activity.’
    • ‘I haven't had much success refuting their accusations.’
    • ‘This argument can be refuted by deriving a contradiction.’
    • ‘Second, the evidence refutes the notion that the underclass syndrome is ironclad.’
    • ‘Fortunately, I do not have to refute the labor theory of value, it's already been done, see Human Action by Mises.’
    • ‘It is for the defence to search for evidence to refute the accusation's charges.’
    • ‘To be useful to scholars a proposition must be falsifiable - there must be something which could in theory refute the statement.’
    • ‘If they are not correct, they have to be contradicted or refuted by evidence.’
    • ‘Most incorrect or incoherent claims are easily refuted by experience or logic but religious concepts are different.’
    • ‘Dembski's latest attempt to refute Darwinian theory is by arguing that in a closed system, information can only decrease.’
    • ‘Naturally, the panelists are keen to refute the various theories and game plans that dominate the thinking of the ruling establishment in Washington.’
    • ‘In these papers, where he was largely concerned with general philosophical problems of time and space, he adopted a quixotic standpoint in his attempt to refute the theory as being logically untenable.’
    • ‘Remember, he already knows the facts that I use to refute these accusations.’
    • ‘To refute the accusations, Ma went to Xianyang 215 Hospital for a hymen test on February 6.’
    • ‘As with all research, evaluations of these hypotheses will not confirm or refute associated theories but may allow refinement of theories.’
    disprove, prove false, prove wrong, prove to be false, prove to be wrong, show to be false, show to be wrong, rebut, confute, give the lie to, demolish, explode, debunk, drive a coach and horses through, discredit, invalidate
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    1. 1.1 Prove that (someone) is wrong.
      ‘his voice challenging his audience to rise and refute him’
      • ‘Bitterly, he murmurs how he should have refuted the women and explained his innocence.’
      • ‘In addition, Pim did an awful job of refuting me.’
      • ‘Literature refutes both people who think gender should be abolished and people who have overly-narrow views of womanhood or manhood.’
      • ‘But one cannot refute Howard by suggesting that his intervention somehow ‘disrupts’ the study of history.’
      • ‘We set out over the past year to refute those people who said we couldn't do more than one thing at a time.’
      • ‘And it is because he followed these instructions with such urbanity, wit, and sophistication, Hale argues, that Milton provided a particular pleasure to his readers and was so successful in refuting his opponent.’
      • ‘That's America, a place where Cindy Sheehan can say whatever the hell she wants and where you are free to refute her.’
      • ‘Instead, to date, Gibson has refused to fully refute his father.’
      • ‘But I think, there's plenty of evidence to refute him on the facts.’
      • ‘I'm going to refute Bruce in three easy steps, first with some history, second with some analogy, and lastly with a bit of philosophy.’
      • ‘Such achievements, and the principles of common purpose that drove them, should be used to refute Europe's sceptics everywhere.’
      • ‘Robert Nozick effectively refuted Rawls in making the ethical basis of libertarianism plain, but even the necessity of refuting him is doubtful if he fails by his own line of reasoning.’
      • ‘They have five or six people running around doing talk shows and trying to refute me and trying to besmirch me.’
      • ‘But instead of trying to refute what Chomsky actually says and writes, Morley instead decides to refute the man himself.’
      • ‘It is clearly intended to refute those who denied what is now known as the doctrine of the resurrection.’
      • ‘This is an enormous leap, for the bulk of Prof. Budziszewski's arguments aim to refute opponents of capital punishment.’
      • ‘Well, Neil, now we've got somebody on the other side to refute you.’
      • ‘The task of historical materialism in Russia is not to refute the enemy but to destroy him!’
      • ‘It's almost as if Bush was daring people to refute him, knowing full well that it was such an illogical claim that it would make people uncomfortable to call him on it.’
      • ‘It is one of history's great ironies that the man who publicly refuted him was none other than Henry VIII, rewarded with the title of Fidei Defensor - Defender of the Faith - in 1521.’
    2. 1.2 Deny or contradict (a statement or accusation)
      ‘a spokesman totally refuted the allegation of bias’
      • ‘But again, this has not been substantiated, on the contrary it was flatly refuted by one of the people we spoke to.’
      • ‘The Republicans also refuted the accusations that The Joker was part of a vast right-wing conspiracy.’
      • ‘After they went public the minister refuted the accusation.’
      • ‘Waterford Against Racism vehemently refutes the outrageous accusations made by Minister of Justice, John O'Donoghue in the past week.’
      • ‘I refute Mr Strausbaugh's accusations but I applaud his championing of Ballard.’
      • ‘The accusations have been refuted by K & WVR bosses, who said figures released this week showed that the number of people travelling on the five-mile line was continuing to increase.’
      • ‘Sheikh Hamad refuted those accusations, saying that all the children were Sudanese who entered the country legally and were accompanied by their parents or a guardian.’
      • ‘The Cosla group, however, refutes any accusations of unfair play, claiming that McConnell and the rest of the group are simply showing ‘foresight’ in setting out local government's views.’
      • ‘Pasiya strongly refutes these allegations, accusing some of these players of ill discipline.’
      • ‘The students' protest was refuted by IPB spokesman Agus Lelana, who said the institute would support the administration's effort to ease congestion in the area.’
      • ‘He also refuted suggestions that a resident was not given daily walks as required.’
      • ‘Before Taiden could even begin to refute these accusations, the crowd turned on him.’
      • ‘We totally refute any suggestion that these dismissals are linked to anything other than a serious breach of discipline.’
      • ‘When Mahendran confronted them, they were annoyed and refuted his accusation.’
      • ‘Responding to concerns in the Northern Isles, NorthLink have refuted accusations that it is seeking to cut jobs in the islands.’
      • ‘He was scheduled to hold a press conference in Bangkok later Saturday to refute accusations by the Cambodian government that he incited the riots.’
      • ‘As an experienced Real Estate Agent I strongly refute the claims made in this letter.’
      • ‘Su's accusation was refuted by city government officials, who said the construction completion date had been officially postponed to the end of August next year.’
      • ‘Kenyon refuted all these accusations and was clearly annoyed they have been made public.’
      • ‘Indeed recently, Egypt has been keen to refute accusations that it has lost its influence in Africa and that it perceives Africa as a fourth priority, after the Middle East, the US, and Europe.’
      deny, reject, repudiate, rebut, declare to be untrue
      View synonyms

Usage

The core meaning of refute is ‘prove a statement or theory to be wrong’, as in attempts to refute Einstein's theory. In the second half of the 20th century a more general sense developed, meaning simply ‘deny’, as in I absolutely refute the charges made against me. Traditionalists object to this newer use as an unacceptable degradation of the language, but it is widely encountered

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin refutare ‘repel, rebut’.

Pronunciation

refute

/rɪˈfjuːt/