Definition of refractor in English:

refractor

noun

  • 1A lens or other object which causes refraction.

    • ‘Your doctor may use a computerized refractor to measure your eyes and estimate the prescription you need to correct a refractive error.’
    • ‘Each GSP student builds a complete 60-mm diameter f / 12 refractor and mount.’
    • ‘He contributed to the theory of refraction, and as a result of his theory of the wave form of light he was able to calculate the refraction within the lenses and make refractors with lesser chromatic and spherical aberration.’
    • ‘The results demonstrated that trained nurses and lay screeners achieved similar accuracy rates administering the two automated refractors.’
    • ‘An arc of white light shone through the carefully planned refractors near its crest, making the Citadel look like an archer's bow drawn to the sky.’
    1. 1.1A refracting telescope.
      • ‘The Big Bear investigators used a telescope of only modest size - a 6-inch refractor.’
      • ‘At the same site you can take a virtual tour of the observatory and its telescope, whose refractor is still the largest of its kind in the world.’
      • ‘Secretary Martin Armitage said: ‘We will have our observatory telescope aimed at the Sun, as well as our pride and joy - a special solar filter attached to a premium refractor.’’
      • ‘K. Sakthivel of the Astronomy Club said that the group of observers used a 60 mm refractor to project the image of the sun upon a flat surface where it could be viewed comfortably.’
      • ‘Lowell established an observatory on Mars Hill in Arizona and the telescope he used - a superb Brashear refractor - has been sitting here, unused, for years.’
      • ‘Actually it was the biggest refractor (lens telescope); Sir William Herschel, who had died in 1822, had previously constructed larger reflecting telescopes (using curved mirrors) out at Slough.’
      • ‘One evening he was observing with a rather crude refractor (a lens telescope), with a focal length of 24 feet.’
      • ‘Italian mathematician and astronomer Galileo Galilei used the first optical telescope, a refractor, in 1610.’
      • ‘The nine-centimetre Orion refractors are best-suited for viewing the moon, but there's something to be said for being able to do it from the comfort of your plunge pool.’
      • ‘This he equipped with a small refractor: a lens telescope with an aperture of four inches.’

Pronunciation:

refractor

/rɪˈfraktə/