Definition of reformative in English:

reformative

adjective

  • See reform

    • ‘Fuller and Hawthorne provide fitting contrasts to Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry Ward Beecher who, above all others, had celebrated individual morality and ‘the pure inward reformative light’ in spite of society's fallen state.’
    • ‘For a film that professes to be about the street-fights of politics and the reformative power of youth, ‘Yuva’ manages to avoid, as far as possible, any direct look at sleaze and violence.’
    • ‘In this regard, correctional and reformative efforts are being constantly carried out to suit the requirements of the prisoner welfare and rehabilitation programmes.’
    • ‘Sentences imposed on married men suggest that the rarity of repeat judgments against wife beaters originated chiefly from the financial not the reformative effects of sentences on the family.’
    • ‘Such concerns are all the more valid, considering the slight but visible difference detected even within the ruling circles between a more reformative party and a somewhat stability-oriented administration.’

Pronunciation

reformative

/rɪˈfɔːmətɪv/