Definition of reductionism in English:

reductionism

noun

derogatory
  • [mass noun] The practice of analysing and describing a complex phenomenon in terms of its simple or fundamental constituents, especially when this is said to provide a sufficient explanation.

    • ‘This tradition, with its suspect promise of simplicity, has a tattered reputation because of its reductionism.’
    • ‘Western philosophy today can he characterized by three things: reductionism, rationalism and a belief in progress.’
    • ‘Her faith, however, is not a simple brand of spiritual reductionism whereupon community and congregational problems can be explained by God.’
    • ‘This reductionism is an ideological fantasy, rather than a theoretical position resting on solid argument.’
    • ‘That does not require that in embracing naturalism one also embrace determinism, physicalism, and reductionism.’
    • ‘Opposing either form of reductionism would be the thesis that both species of causation exist but that neither is analysable in terms of the other.’
    • ‘This kind of reductionism is not very useful, and it is also politically paralysing.’
    • ‘What an extraordinarily explicit statement of scientific reductionism!’
    • ‘In contrast to reductionism, there is the view that testimony is itself a ‘basic’ source of warrant.’
    • ‘Ayer by now thought phenomenalism was unsuccessful in this attempt, and again reductionism would not work for the future cases.’
    • ‘Even those that oppose simple reductionism do not come close to Myers's ultimate hopes.’
    • ‘Such reductionism is done purposefully to justify military aggression, he added.’
    • ‘But there is always something more to Cocteau's films than the simple reductionism of ordinary interpretation.’
    • ‘Even for the casually religious, such seeming reductionism can rankle.’
    • ‘What is the significance of empiricism or reductionism?’
    • ‘The main enemies are psychologism, reductionism, idealism, and the distortion of the phenomena by philosophical systems.’
    • ‘Here the mind is not limited by any reductionism such as religion, caste, nationality etc.’
    • ‘The problem is called economic reductionism - seeing economic interests at all times and in every case as being the only phenomenon necessary to understand political decisions.’
    • ‘No less interesting has been the enthusiastic reception of several recent political plays that steered clear of rigid political reductionism.’
    • ‘You could say this is an attack on reductionism, or on fundamentalism.’

Pronunciation:

reductionism

/rɪˈdʌkʃ(ə)nɪz(ə)m/