Definition of red mist in English:

red mist

noun

British
  • Used in reference to a fit of extreme anger that temporarily clouds a person's judgement:

    ‘for the second time in a week, the red mist descended on Rooney’
    • ‘In the second period, Leeds' red mist cleared sufficiently for them to start looking the better side, even with 10 men.’
    • ‘I felt the red mist subside, and then felt embarrassed.’
    • ‘The red mist descended however and Wroe was sent off.’
    • ‘His fame, at present, has protected him, and in doing so was merely ensuring he continued to allow the red mist to descend.’
    • ‘Sorry mate, the red mist descends whenever I see that pop video thing.’
    • ‘Can I just point out that she makes a red mist appear in front of my eyes every time I think about her?’
    • ‘And who can forget when the red mist descended back in France 1998 against Argentina?’
    • ‘The second-half found a touch of the Ilkley red mist descending.’
    • ‘Once the red mist had lifted, however, Rosanna offered a gracious apology for her comments, trotting out the usual stuff about not meaning to offend anyone, etc., etc.’
    • ‘The Rovers midfielder's two-foot lunge on Trond Egil Soltvedt after 53 minutes prompted a red card to match the red mist.’
    • ‘It requires understanding, sensitivity and discretion, all of which go out the window when the red mist descends.’
    • ‘It was then that McSwegan became engulfed in a red mist.’
    • ‘At least the American went off peaceably this time, the former Rangers player being known not to stop at one card when the red mist descends.’
    • ‘And having rediscovered his best form when Paston was sidelined, a few seconds of red mist at the Priestfield cut short his involvement once more.’
    • ‘If you read my sentence without the red mist descending you might notice there was no comma after the word grammar.’
    • ‘They know when the red mist is about to descend and can rein in their anger.’
    • ‘My hands convulsively clenched, my teeth clamped together, my nostrils flared, my lips curled, and a red mist descended in front of my eyes.’
    • ‘The anger was leaving him, draining away and all the alcohol he had downed at the club was coming back to him, a red mist threatening to totally overthrow his composure.’
    • ‘I wasn't an angry child and generally avoided fights, but I get a red mist when somebody hits me first and fight tooth and nail.’
    • ‘No surprise that Robert Pires won't be available for the Sheffield United game either after David Prutton's red mist moment at Southampton.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from the supposed physiological effect of a rush of blood to the head in anger or excitement.