noun

  • 1mass noun Red colour or pigment.

    ‘their work is marked in red by the teacher’
    • ‘The lighting in red, blue and warm yellow set the mood according to the emotion depicted.’
    • ‘Delhi is a city of magnificence and desolation, grandeur and history, all seeped in red and purple.’
    • ‘The links to the useful posts were formerly in the area outlined in red.’
    • ‘The three main colours of berry are red, orange and yellow.’
    • ‘All club supporters are asked to turn out and support these young boys in red.’
    • ‘I started with obnoxious colours, brown and red mainly, and worked from there.’
    • ‘A Vote Labour leaflet in red and yellow is pinned to an upper window of his bungalow.’
    • ‘In addition to the usual acts of remembrance, London was illuminated in red from Thursday through to Sunday.’
    • ‘The impressive hall and stairway are decorated in red and yellow with an attractive black and white tiled floor.’
    • ‘In the image, however, the shortest wavelengths are represented as blue, while the longest are coloured in red.’
    • ‘As the name implies, most of the Bar Rouge is decorated in red to create a striking visual effect.’
    • ‘There are earrings with precious stones in red, green and blue at another stall.’
    • ‘Come here at sunset, when the colours flame in red and orange, bold and beautiful.’
    • ‘The restaurant creates varied kinds of curries in red, yellow, green, black and white.’
    • ‘Brickfind Ltd sells reclaimed bricks in red, yellow and soft grey.’
    • ‘Bright green eyes lined in red blinked up at me and my stomach dropped as I pulled my baby stepbrother into a hug.’
    • ‘His blue eyes were rimmed in red, and large brown circles cried underneath them.’
    • ‘After a week or so, they turn from the colours of capsicums - green, yellow or red - to the brown that we recognise.’
    • ‘Acidic conserved amino acids are shown in yellow and basic in red.’
    • ‘Presumably this is to encourage us to stop ignoring any bill not coloured in red.’
    1. 1.1 Red clothes or material.
      ‘she could not wear red’
      • ‘If we did go out, we were not to wear red, smile, let it be known that we were Jewish, or eat in public.’
      • ‘Oprah wore red, but everyone else was in white-tie formal for her big bash over the weekend.’
      • ‘You could always tell who was from where because we wore blue and they wore red.’
      • ‘Their daughter, Molly, wore a white dress and all her bridesmaids wore red.’
      • ‘We did primary colours, we did school-kid uniforms, we did St. Valentine's and all wore red.’
      • ‘Cardinals wear red, and other ranks are noted by their style of dress and rings.’
      • ‘Perhaps it's because I was wearing bright red on a cold, grim rainy day.’
      • ‘In front of the church police were questioning some young men wearing red.’
      • ‘To make a really great photo, they need lots of people to come along, wearing as much red as possible.’
      • ‘It is hard to get away from the fact that she has worn red on most episodes.’
      • ‘Ah, that we could all wear red so well and with no thought to clashing with our surroundings.’
      • ‘The club always wore red and white but black has now replaced the white.’
      • ‘The colour blue was chosen to distinguish the police from the British military, who then wore red and white.’
      • ‘The voice belonged to a young woman dressed in bright red, a white scarf around her head, a bowl of water in her hands.’
      • ‘The bride will wear red to maintain the festive spirit and regulars will share a full turkey dinner followed by mince pies and Christmas pud.’
      • ‘His own transport is a Hummer and, at his £100,000 wedding staged in a Welsh castle, he wore red.’
      • ‘To note one example, when a mother comes to understand her son better near the end of the film, she is wearing red.’
      • ‘Tomorrow somebody may say that I shouldn't wear khaki to work and should only wear red.’
      • ‘The groom wore red and the bride looked elegant in an old-fashioned riding habit.’
      • ‘I leaned down from my saddle and snatched a shield from a corpse wearing red.’
  • 2A red thing.

    ‘which dress - the black or the red?’
    • ‘Penedes in the north east led the planting of French grape varieties and now makes dry white wine and well-flavoured reds with these and traditional grapes.’
    • ‘If you ask me, it should be an automatic red.’
    • ‘In most frames the reds were scattered round the table in the course of disjointed play and long bouts of safety.’
    • ‘Mendoza is the most important region, particularly for reds.’
    • ‘They were "caning reds" according to the fishermen, because they could get their bait to the bottom.’
    • ‘There is usually some producer somewhere in the world deliberately fashioning light reds in this style to be consumed chilled.’
    • ‘A sunny, dry season had growers excited for that year's reds.’
    • ‘The making of a merlot Duckhorn continues string of impressive reds.’
    • ‘This appellation is undergoing much-needed revival but old vintages suggest that the potential for long-lived, concentrated reds is there.’
    • ‘"They have this decent Spanish red for only 70 kuai a bottle," I called out from the living room.’
    • ‘However, several missed reds proved vital in the next two frames and O'Sullivan recorded his first win of this year's £205,000 event.’
    • ‘Concentrated, full, rich and velvety, this nicely structured, complex red has cherry, cloves, vanilla, pepper and aniseed in abundance.’
    • ‘I tried all the house reds.’
    • ‘A litre of house red has made my memories fuzzy but I'm sure the meal was lovely.’
    • ‘It is an honest, everyday red with a nice, clean finish.’
    • ‘A more recent recruit to my list of reds for this time of year, South African Shiraz, came as a huge surprise.’
    1. 2.1 A red wine.
      ‘good Italian reds at affordable prices’
      mass noun ‘a bottle of red’
      • ‘All the great white wines are made from Chardonnay, all the great reds from Pinot Noir.’
      • ‘It goes without saying that Bordeaux is better known for reds but this wine certainly doesn't let the side down.’
      • ‘And what Sauvignon Blanc does for white wines, Cabernet Sauvignon can do for reds.’
      • ‘The minute the mercury soars, red wines, especially big reds, start to turn volatile and taste soupy and mawkish.’
      • ‘Delicate reds, such as wines from France's Beaujolais and Chinon appellations, can often fulfil the role of a white wine, and vice versa.’
      • ‘If I ventured from the reds, Chardonnays replaced the lighter, less fulfilling whites.’
      • ‘Some people regard white wines as something to rinse the palate with before they move on to some reds, but these two wines are worth a few minutes' pause.’
      • ‘Tartaric acid is what gives balance to sugars in white wines and tannins in reds.’
      • ‘You don't have to stick with sweet wines, some dry reds can make suitable chocolate partners as well.’
      • ‘Wine by the glass business is strong, too, he reports, and the bar offers eight white wines and seven reds.’
      • ‘Screwcaps are ok for young, zippy whites and reds, but are they right for fine wines?’
      • ‘Beaujolais is the perfect wine for people who like the soft fruity reds.’
      • ‘And the thick bottle and handsome label make it an excellent gift wine for a lover of big reds.’
      • ‘As U.S. wine sales grow, reds have overtaken whites.’
      • ‘Steer clear of excessively tannic reds, such as Cabernet Sauvignons.’
      • ‘We tasted a wide range of wines, from a sparkler to whites to reds to a very nice little semisparkler for dessert.’
      • ‘The lighter, almost earthy reds can be good here, too, if the wine producer has aimed for concentration.’
      • ‘Acidity is more of a taste factor in white wines than in reds.’
      • ‘It favours a cool, climate but ripens earlier than other reds such as Cabernet.’
      • ‘There is a limited wine list, from which I only tried the house wines, both the red and the white were excellent and not expensive.’
    2. 2.2 A red ball in snooker or billiards.
      • ‘Another highly tactical frame, and the longest in the match so far, as Williams and Doherty reach just 36 points between them with 11 reds potted.’
      • ‘Doherty opened the scoring with a break of 44 but, bridging awkwardly, missed a red to a middle pocket.’
      • ‘Williams scored first, but it was Hunter who made the frame and championship winning contribution as he cleared a sizeable cluster of reds.’
      • ‘Wood gained four points from a snooker on the last red which left him ideally positioned for a clearance.’
      • ‘The reds are open though, so whoever pots first will be in pole position.’
      • ‘However, several missed reds proved vital in the next two frames and O'Sullivan recorded his first win of this year's £205,000 event.’
      • ‘He was once known to have conceded a frame with 13 reds on the table.’
      • ‘Hamilton looked in control of the next frame until a bad contact on the cue ball resulted in him missing a simple red.’
      • ‘Even after clambering on the table, he could not get a good enough shot at the three reds clustered near the cushion.’
      • ‘The world number one played a simple safety shot to leave the white ball on the bottom cushion and Doherty played the ball deadweight into the pack of reds.’
      • ‘Another simple red is missed and O'Sullivan goes 48 points up with the remaining reds all on the cushion.’
      • ‘He led 53-8 with two reds left in the 16th frame but snookered himself on the second last red.’
      • ‘Williams cleared up to win the first after King had missed a simple red into the bottom corner.’
      • ‘In this instance, that meant the pink had to be returned to the centre of a group of reds with just enough room to fit the ball in the middle.’
      • ‘Hunter led by four points when he found himself snookered on the last red.’
      • ‘Henry takes full advantage with the reds well split, and boosts his confidence with a stylish break of 89 to win the opening frame.’
      • ‘The 2002 British Open champion sank 14 reds before missing the penultimate black in the final frame of the day.’
      • ‘Stevens looks to be heading to level the match, but his 45 break falters when he misses a red.’
      • ‘Three reds remain but Hendry surprisingly concedes to leave his opponent just one frame from victory.’
      • ‘He potted 13 reds and 12 blacks before losing position on the colour.’
    3. 2.3 A red light.
  • 3informal, derogatory A communist or socialist.

    • ‘The fact is, fighting anarchists, reds and labor organizers played a very important part in developing modern forms of identification and police power.’
    • ‘Never one to underestimate or understate her own judgements, she feels that China is communist and calls a red a red.’
    • ‘Anton Denikin was a Russian general who fought for the Whites during Russia's civil war against the reds - Lenin's Bolsheviks.’
    • ‘Hoover made an index of 450,000 people he considered to be dangerous reds.’
    • ‘Traditionally, spies revolt against Labour governments because they fear the party is made up of unpatriotic reds.’
    communist, marxist, socialist, left-winger, leftist, bolshevik, revolutionary, anti-capitalist
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  • 4the redThe situation of owing money to a bank or making a loss in a business operation.

    ‘the company was £4 million in the red’
    ‘moving the health authority out of the red will be a huge challenge’
    ‘small declines in revenue can soon send an airline plunging into the red’
    • ‘All other hospital trusts in West Yorkshire are also in the red.’
    • ‘A film with a budget of this size but without stars to lure moviegoers is unlikely to stay out of the red.’
    • ‘He said more than five farms had been liquidated and the balance sheets of the remaining farms were in the red.’
    • ‘Of course, the best way to deal with debt is never to get into the red in the first place.’
    • ‘This is the first time the company has been in the red, after previously churning out profits in its operations.’
    • ‘So, within a few days of my pay going into my bank account, I always was back in the red again.’
    • ‘Secondary schools in the area which are in the red have debts on average more than three times those of similar schools elsewhere.’
    • ‘That rating was assigned in 1999, when we were in the red on our short-term liquidity.’
    • ‘Wilsden Primary has been left £54,000 in the red by crippling budget cuts.’
    • ‘However, a mistake in applying for European funding meant it was immediately £165,000 in the red.’
    • ‘Other banks charge daily or monthly ‘overdraft management’ fees when you're in the red.’
    • ‘The organisers were already in the red, even before the start of the event.’
    • ‘They struggled out of the red this year to post modest profits of NZ $6 million.’
    • ‘Towards the end of the month however, Joe tends to slip into the red by up to £300.’
    • ‘A 2% gain in December wasn't enough to lift the company out of the red.’
    • ‘Sometimes, the startup costs are high, and for a few years the business will run in the red.’
    • ‘This paper last week reported that the average household is £24,000 in the red, excluding mortgages.’
    • ‘If you find that you regularly go into the red each month, then you must be living beyond your means, which means spending more than you earn.’
    • ‘When heretired in 1988, the company plunged into the red.’
    • ‘The proposals have been given a mixed response by consumer groups as new research highlights how far UK consumers have fallen into the red.’
    • ‘Both Trusts have a joint management structure and financial recovery plan to get them out of the red over the next three years.’
    overdrawn, in debt, in debit, in deficit, owing money, in arrears, showing a loss
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