Definition of rectitude in English:

rectitude

noun

mass nounformal
  • Morally correct behaviour or thinking; righteousness.

    ‘Mattie is a model of rectitude’
    • ‘In class they would study hard; in the dorms they would be models of rectitude and self-discipline.’
    • ‘He is a model of moral rectitude, unabashed pragmatism, voluminous machismo and carnal fortification.’
    • ‘The ‘devoting’ of the people to God was a demonstration of the divine rectitude and justice.’
    • ‘Suffering does not necessarily confer saintliness or rectitude.’
    • ‘That doesn't sound at all like a person convinced of his own rectitude.’
    • ‘It brings a whole new meaning to moral rectitude.’
    • ‘We know that he has the moral rectitude to stand up to the vilest attacks and pressure.’
    • ‘They will, however, be loath to permit deviant minorities to wander from widely acknowledged paths of rectitude.’
    • ‘The emphasis here is on exemplary, individual acts of moral protest, not on ideological rectitude.’
    • ‘There has been no catharsis of moral or strategic rectitude.’
    • ‘Is there another group that seeks the path of rectitude and moderation with the same fervor?’
    • ‘In recent years, Japan, once a model of fiscal rectitude, spent wildly on public works projects in an effort to stimulate the economy.’
    • ‘She's high-strung, suspicious and full of moral rectitude.’
    • ‘He now seems more than ever convinced of his own rectitude, more certain that his words and actions are necessarily benevolent.’
    • ‘We also stand for fiscal rectitude and law and order.’
    • ‘It is therefore about American self-respect, rightness, and a sense of moral rectitude.’
    • ‘One excellent way to forget it is to focus with righteous rectitude on the evils of others while focusing on the nobility of oneself.’
    • ‘However they range from the model of rectitude to the reprobate, from the intellectual to the ignorant, we vary more.’
    • ‘And if they did not know it - if they were genuinely convinced of their own rectitude - can we call them evil?’
    • ‘If more nudity is the conduit by which these ends are achieved, then so be it, and to hell with moral rectitude.’
    righteousness, goodness, virtue, moral virtue, morality, honour, honourableness, integrity, principle, probity, honesty, right-mindedness, trustworthiness, truthfulness, uprightness, upstandingness, good character, scrupulousness, decency, fairness, equity, justice
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting straightness): from Old French, from late Latin rectitudo, from Latin rectus ‘right, straight’.

Pronunciation

rectitude

/ˈrɛktɪtjuːd/