Main definitions of recreation in English

: recreation1recreation2

recreation1

noun

mass noun
  • Activity done for enjoyment when one is not working.

    ‘she rides for recreation’
    as modifier ‘sport and recreation facilities’
    count noun ‘his recreations included golf and rugby’
    • ‘The wider community would have access to new recreation and leisure facilities.’
    • ‘This is in line with government policy aimed at increasing participation in sport and recreation in these areas.’
    • ‘Folk dances are for recreation and enjoyment, and are often at the centre of seasonal celebrations and social events.’
    • ‘They accepted that the original intention was that the arena should be used as a sports and recreation area but they did not accept that it had been maintained as such by the public purse.’
    • ‘It was also stipulated that the Corporation should be debarred from selling the estate or any part of it, and that it should be used for enjoyment and recreation by everyone.’
    • ‘Through the project, sports fields and recreation parks have been set up in areas from where people have been removed.’
    • ‘They have traditionally been involved in sports and recreation, playing host to a variety of activities.’
    • ‘Educated at Eton and Oxford, he lists his recreations in Who's Who as photography, gardening and horseracing.’
    • ‘The diverse needs of wildlife, aesthetics, bio-diversity and recreation all have to be juggled.’
    • ‘York Railway Institute is an affordable sport and recreation facility run by volunteers, where all profit is poured back for the benefit of the members.’
    • ‘Hanmer Forest needs to be maintained in the future for public enjoyment, for recreation and for education.’
    • ‘Councillors have given the go-ahead for plans to create a fishing and recreation centre at Wallsuches Reservoir.’
    • ‘In addition, we typically devote one class per week to recreation and leisure activities.’
    • ‘It also gives the players an opportunity to experience other forms of physical activity and recreation.’
    • ‘The object of the day is to promote greater participation by women of all ages in lifelong sport, recreation and physical activity.’
    • ‘She devoted a lot of time to recreation, hobbies, and charity work.’
    • ‘Ambitious plans to transform a disused piece of land in York into a fully-equipped community sports and recreation facility have moved a step closer to reality.’
    • ‘Those who spend a great amount of time outdoors due to recreation or work activities, must take the greatest protective measures.’
    • ‘The purpose of sport was to provide fun activities during recreation time from which people could derive plenty of pleasure, fun and enjoyment.’
    • ‘The cost of the course, which has been organised by Kingston's sports and recreation department, is £8.’
    pleasure, leisure, relaxation, fun, enjoyment, entertainment, amusement, refreshment, restoration, distraction, diversion
    pastime, hobby, leisure activity, leisure pursuit, leisure interest, entertainment, diversion, divertissement, distraction, avocation
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (also in the sense ‘mental or spiritual consolation’): via Old French from Latin recreatio(n-), from recreare ‘create again, renew’.

Pronunciation

recreation

/ˌrɛkrɪˈeɪʃ(ə)n/

Main definitions of recreation in English

: recreation1recreation2

recreation2

noun

mass noun
  • 1The action or process of creating something again.

    ‘the periodic destruction and recreation of the universe’
    • ‘Shiva the destroyer is a necessary part of the trinity because, without destruction, there can be no recreation.’
    • ‘Most recently these boots have been very grotty, having been present for the destruction and recreation of the living rooms and the continuing demolition of the garden.’
    • ‘The recreation of the Famine ship took place at Blennerville, near Tralee, Co Kerry, and was completed in 2002.’
    1. 1.1count noun A re-enactment or simulation of something.
      ‘they enjoyed television's recreations of more confident times’
      • ‘From tomorrow, visitors will be able to marvel at set-piece table recreations of famous meals, like the Duke of Newcastle's Feast of 1698, with its wild boar and lobster pies and dressed hares.’
      • ‘In a week's time, he turned two large pieces of wood into detailed, lifelike recreations based on a photo.’
      • ‘A number of scenes in Attenborough's film ‘Gandhi’ were recreations based on Kanu Gandhi's pictures.’
      • ‘A sumptuous domed Byzantine basilica, an imaginative recreation of St Mark's Alexandrian church, dominates the backdrop.’
      • ‘While the recreations adequately portray the father of psychoanalysis they cannot make him likable.’
      • ‘Students in Sheffield are to bring some of Yorkshire's most historic ruins back to life on the Internet with painstaking recreations of what they once would have looked like.’
      • ‘Both films intersperse the main narrative with both clips and stills from the early twentieth century silent films they are paying homage to, as well as with their own simulations and recreations of those same early films.’
      • ‘As building work on a £400,000 recreation of historic cottages in Leigh goes full steam ahead plans are already afoot to get the buildings listed.’
      • ‘Artefacts of prison life are also on display, including recreations of the blanket and soap sculptures made by the inmates.’
      • ‘In Mary, the latest scientific evidence is combined with stunning computer graphics and dramatic recreations to reveal the real woman behind the image.’
      • ‘In his onscreen recreation of his off-Broadway stage role, John Cameron Mitchell is astounding in Hedwig and the Angry Inch.’
      • ‘The recreations of oil paintings are printed onto canvas and hand finished by skilled craftsmen.’
      • ‘Tall ships and historic vessels were used as a backdrop for a recreation of a 19th Century Naval clash, set to sound and music.’
      • ‘It is a handsome period recreation, full of action that is both exciting and plausible, and gives you a thing or two to think about.’
      • ‘They wanted the audience to believe it was watching real footage, not their recreations, to make a more believable film.’
      • ‘Such epic historical recreations in film have in the past left themselves open to severe criticism with their somewhat loose, sometimes ignorant interpretations of fact.’
      • ‘Admittedly, the recreations of early '50s Hollywood streets are beautiful.’
      • ‘Idriess's recreation of the massacre, during which two children were shot at point-blank range, makes grim reading.’
      • ‘Fans of cinema, silent or not, will marvel at the acting, the production design, and the inventive nature of the movies, photographic recreations, and documentary material presented.’
      • ‘A team from Hull University yesterday unveiled stunning new ‘virtual reality’ equipment that allows users to step inside three-dimensional recreations of almost any landscape.’

Origin

Early 16th century: from re- ‘again’ + creation.

Pronunciation

recreation

/ˌriːkrɪˈeɪʃ(ə)n/