Definition of reclassify in English:

reclassify

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Assign to a different class or category.

    ‘what was previously tax relief may be reclassified as government expenditure’
    • ‘Secondly reclassifying the drugs will do absolutely nothing to prevent anyone else from dying.’
    • ‘But reclassifying fast food workers as manufacturing employees could have other advantages for the administration.’
    • ‘Councillors also said the land was classed as industrial and would need to be reclassified as residential land for the application to go through.’
    • ‘A further eight police forces showed some deterioration, but it was not bad enough for them to be reclassified.’
    • ‘The unit houses 16 prisoners whose security status has been reclassified as the lowest (Category D) and who are allowed out to work in the community to prepare them for release.’
    • ‘The new rules will make it much easier for employers to reclassify workers as managers or administrators, making them ineligible for time-and-a-half pay when they work more than 40 hours in a week.’
    • ‘I do not support reclassifying anti-war protestors as terrorists.’
    • ‘But in November 2000 the prison was reclassified as a Category C prison, which meant inmates could not work in the community.’
    • ‘The study provides enough alarming data to warrant emergency measures by State Governments to reclassify wetlands as protected areas.’
    • ‘The Government decision to reclassify cannabis as a less dangerous drug has been slammed by local political and community representatives.’
    • ‘Ketamine is currently legal although the Home Office has plans to reclassify it as a class C drug by the end of this year.’
    • ‘Following a two-hour meeting with ministry officials, however, Giuseppi said it was agreed that stipulated categories of workers would be reclassified.’
    • ‘The contract also reclassifies secretaries, library and teaching assistants in a higher pay grade.’
    • ‘In 2002 the navy reclassified him as missing in action, captured.’
    • ‘This year the Ministry of Health absolutely slashed hospital waiting lists by reclassifying patients, disguising the fact that thousands of people were waiting for important operations.’
    • ‘It has taken action in Europe in an attempt to get the Government to reclassify BSE material as infectious and hazardous waste.’
    • ‘I'm not clear on why simply reclassifying the former as issues of civil liberties rather than economic policy answers the broader question.’
    • ‘That leaves employers to begin reclassifying workers according to overtime rules that, unfortunately, aren't clear yet.’
    • ‘The British government has now confused the issue even more, if such a thing is possible, by reclassifying cannabis from a Class B to a Class C substance, effectively decriminalising it.’
    • ‘The book was reclassified Category 1 - Restricted.’
    1. 1.1(in South Africa during the apartheid era) officially assign (someone) to a different legally defined ethnic group.
      • ‘The fine print is fascinating, explaining the criteria used by government panels to reclassify people from one racial group to another.’
      • ‘She was never legally reclassified; her father fought tirelessly against it.’

Pronunciation:

reclassify

/riːˈklasɪfʌɪ/