Definition of rebuff in English:

rebuff

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Reject (someone or something) in an abrupt or ungracious manner.

    ‘I asked her to be my wife, and was rebuffed in no uncertain terms’
    • ‘For the next two hours, the bold captain stayed below, eating and drinking, rebuffing nervous passengers and becoming more and more brusque and abusive to anyone who remonstrated with him.’
    • ‘Rejecting businesses associated with poor human rights and unfair labour practices lost it £847,000 and rebuffing organisations involved in the production of problematic chemicals cost £688,000.’
    • ‘After rebuffing him, Gregory alleged, the pundit retaliated by reducing his pay and subsequently firing him.’
    • ‘In fact, in a speech spanning an entire four sentences, she dedicated half of it to rebuffing the cynics.’
    • ‘Clay's efforts to locate and fix her image are rebuffed in a weary kind of manner.’
    • ‘However the department has rebuffed calls to criminalise those who refuse to obey the law.’
    • ‘He said the party represented a threat to the country and urged people to reclaim the Republic by rebuffing the party in the elections.’
    • ‘Liberal Democrats are often categorised as soft on crime and are used to rebuffing accusations of being soft on terrorism.’
    • ‘Its wrath, had it been rebuffed, was potentially catastrophic.’
    • ‘Kurdish politicians were defiant, rebuffing the Shi'ite alliance's attempts to blame them for the deadlock.’
    • ‘The first attempt to storm the parliament was rebuffed by a volley of police tear gas.’
    • ‘However even he had given up hope after Ferguson had rebuffed his many attempts at getting him to postpone his retirement.’
    • ‘The one attempt he makes to talk to her is rebuffed yet he's still stricken to learn she committed suicide.’
    • ‘We tried desperately to obtain such an electoral pact with the Greens before the election, but we were rebuffed on every occasion.’
    • ‘You know, I can say in response to this column, that for 20 years the Democrats have been rebuffing one part of the progressive agenda after another.’
    • ‘Values that embrace social solidarity and participation were indignantly rebuffed by the new culture.’
    • ‘Cooley appeared in person in May to appeal that decision, but his entreaty was rebuffed.’
    • ‘Even recent approaches by the US were rebuffed or sidetracked by the Indonesian government.’
    • ‘A draft Department of Defence letter rebuffing the president was never sent.’
    • ‘At times, the nightclub singer doesn't seem to like it much either, rebuffing the painter, only to fall back into her arms.’
    reject, turn down, spurn, refuse, decline, repudiate, disdain
    View synonyms

noun

  • An abrupt or ungracious rejection of an offer, request, or friendly gesture.

    ‘his reserve was not intended as a rebuff’
    mass noun ‘callers phoning a chatline need have no fear of rebuff’
    • ‘It might have helped if the person who fielded all our claims had been slightly less triumphant in the tone of her standard rebuff.’
    • ‘It takes effort to refuse, and besides, there's always the danger that the refusal will be interpreted as a rebuff, a betrayal of religion, and a calloused disregard for people in need.’
    • ‘This denial was an embarrassing rebuff for the Australian government.’
    • ‘It could have been a rebuff to what may have been perceived as the BBC's audacious judicial stance, but several of those organisations who refused have since had athletes banned or under suspicion.’
    • ‘In what will be seen as a clear rebuff to the second request, Mr Kenny said that delaying the €176 million project until after Christmas was simply not an option.’
    • ‘As a rebuff to those who think today's teenagers are too narrow-minded, Umay's concerns are notably wide-ranging.’
    • ‘He just laughs and makes a joke out of an intended rebuff.’
    • ‘According to Apter, the mother-in-law is genuinely bewildered by her daughter-in-law's rebuffs of friendship.’
    • ‘This rebuff spurred them to think of an alternative.’
    • ‘Menzies' amendment was seen by some as a rebuff to the ‘non-aligned’ states.’
    • ‘After several rebuffs, Yeda offered to pay for the cost of localization.’
    • ‘General readers who have stayed this far will not be surprised that, in the face of such a blatant rebuff, the Reserve Bank did nothing.’
    • ‘Such an attitude expects no rebuffs and overlooks those it provokes.’
    • ‘In an ironic rebuff to communications technologies, the bill passed the Senate by unanimous, oral vote.’
    • ‘Their joint assertion was a rebuff to the imperialists.’
    • ‘The attempts by some shortsighted commanders to confine themselves to training and to leave education to officers of educational structures have met with a resolute rebuff.’
    • ‘The vote - 322 against, 291 for - was a devastating rebuff.’
    • ‘On a still and empty stage three men appear at the mercy of constant rebuffs.’
    • ‘Sensitive to the alleged and often real rebuffs of friends, but also to the demands of ecclesiastical authority, he was often at its mercy.’
    • ‘Despite my polite rebuff, Adam returned to my cell door a week later and eagerly divulged his deplorable obsession.’
    rejection, snub, slight, repulse, cut
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century: from obsolete French rebuffer (verb), rebuffe (noun), from Italian ri- (expressing opposition) + buffo ‘a gust, puff’, of imitative origin.

Pronunciation

rebuff

/rɪˈbʌf/