Definition of rebrand in English:

rebrand

verb

[WITH OBJECT]usually as noun rebranding
  • Change the corporate image of (a company or organization):

    ‘the company's rebranding of its St Helens operation as Lancashire Travel’
    • ‘Copy shops are rebranding themselves as print centres and are moving in one of two directions.’
    • ‘Businesses, charities, seem obsessed with rebranding themselves.’
    • ‘Why stop there when you can take personal choice to the limit and start rebranding the male population to suit every taste?’
    • ‘In Eastern Europe many former Communist parties have survived and done well by rebranding themselves as worker parties.’
    • ‘However, their latest rebranding exercise might be doing them more harm than good as far as we're concerned.’
    • ‘The obvious answer is through debt-or credit as the banks rebranded it.’
    • ‘It is understood the fund may be rebranded when the new division gets approval to operate from the Central Bank, a process which is expected to take around nine months.’
    • ‘She, along with four underwhelmed London boroughs, have decided to try whip up international interest in the East End by rebranding it under a new name.’
    • ‘The recently announced rebranding strategy will go much deeper than the paint job.’
    • ‘It is understood that rebranding consultants were approached late last year in connection to the plan.’
    • ‘This is the first demonstration of how the co-operative is rebranding itself and its products under this brand.’
    • ‘The Green Party, hoping to pick up a few extra seats in the Super Thursday elections on June 10, have spent this week rebranding themselves.’
    • ‘The club began work this week on updating and rebranding the current facilities to incorporate the new logo and make the ground more welcoming.’
    • ‘Companies that have taken part in the programme have used it to complete rebranding programmes as well as access new markets on either side of the border.’
    • ‘He was rebranding his graphic design company and moving premises to a new €2.3 million site in Donnybrook.’
    • ‘The company has been bought out by a large French chain, and they are closing all the smaller stores and rebranding the larger ones.’
    • ‘Similarly, the Greens are rebranding themselves as ‘the real left party’.’
    • ‘It would mean that American companies would have to go back, repackage, relabel and rebrand their products.’
    • ‘This near-miss reveals that rebranding a region is a tricky business.’
    • ‘He saw no need to rebrand the image and it is unlikely that he could have done so even if he had since the persona he had assumed from the beginning was too deeply ingrained.’

Pronunciation:

rebrand

/riːˈbrand/